Birthday Project 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Give in Johnny's honor and help bring water systems to Navajo families
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Theresa
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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Theresa » Sun May 19, 2013 2:13 pm

Át’ahálo
Wait!

Át’ahálo is a Navajo expression that means “wait!” It’s a way of saying, “hold on” or “sit tight” without needing the entire set of conjugated verbs for “to wait.”

In speech, it is sometimes shortened to either át’ah or t’ahálo.


http://navajowotd.com/post/46944085269/atahalo

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Theresa » Mon May 20, 2013 12:13 pm

Nijaa' doogááł, nidí'nóodah!
Your ears will dry up & fall off!

This is a short video blog about the old Navajo concept of what happens when you say your name. A long time ago, Navajos used to say that if you say your name, "Nijaa' doogááł, nidí'nóodah! Your ears will dry up & fall off!"

Where that concept comes from, I don't know. I tried to ask several people but they don't know. The purpose of this video is just to mention that & share that little history of older Navajo belief. If you know why, post it! If you don't want to, that's fine too! Enjoy! :-)
--Daybreak Warrior

[youtube]5E4lNGwojVs[/youtube]

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by part-time poet » Mon May 20, 2013 8:01 pm

Thanks for the knowledge, Theresa! And thanks for the work involved in putting this together.

:goodvibes:

Part-Time Poet
Those who bring sunshine to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves.
-- J. M. Barrie

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Theresa » Tue May 21, 2013 2:56 pm

Hágoónee’
Okay/Alright then

The Navajo word hágoónee’ is commonly used in parting, and it roughly means “okay/alright then” in English.

It’s almost like saying, “Okay, things are settled. See you later.”

Another useful parting expression is yá’át’ééh - the common word for “hello.” It’s literal meaning is “it is good,” so that could denote a conclusion to events as well.


http://navajowotd.com/post/33780754715/hagoonee

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Theresa » Wed May 22, 2013 3:20 pm

Áłchíní
Children

The Navajo word áłchíní is a noun that means “children” in English.

Bá’áłchíní is how you refer to his/her children (in the third person).

Example:

Ellen bá’áłchíní dóó Jerry bá’áłchíní ólta’góó deeskai.

Ellen’s children and Jerry’s children are going to the school.

You can also use sha’áłchíní (“my children”), na’áłchíní (“your children”), niha’áłchíní (“our children”).


http://navajowotd.com/post/31405175999/alchini

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Theresa » Thu May 23, 2013 8:34 pm

Naaltsoos
Paper, books

This Navajo word refers to paper. It also refers to books of all varieties, and is used in conjunction with other descriptive words to name specific things. For instance, the word for mailman uses naaltsoos, and also the word for certain treaties — which were contained within paper binders.


http://navajowotd.com/post/20400933146/naaltsoos

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by shadowydog » Thu May 23, 2013 8:42 pm

Interesting. Did the Navajo have a written language with "books" before the Spanish came?
I have nothing to do and all day to do it in.

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Theresa » Fri May 24, 2013 8:58 pm

Something a little different today; a Navajo song instead of a word.

"Navajo Squaw Dance Song"

[youtube]OVl5B1SU15M[/youtube]


This is a very old and classic traditional Navajo love song sung by one of the most famous Navajo singers, Edward Lee Natay. (Born and raised at Standing Rock, on the Navajo Reservation near Crown Point, New Mexico. Humanitarian and artist who produced both radio and records of traditional singing, flute-playing and drumming of the Navajo, Hopi, Zuni, Pueblo, Kiowa and Tewa nations. Later in his career he blended these styles with those of popular music, including folk and jazz. Died on October 18, 1966.) This song is called the "Navajo Squaw Dance Song" on the album "Natay Navajo Singer."

It is a non-ceremonial social song typically sung during public events, song and dances, or during school performances. It has been sung by many different performers for many years but made famous by Ed Natay.

Canyon Records has recorded many different types of Native American artists over the years, some traditional and some non-traditional. Ed Natay was the first artist to ever be recorded by Canyon Records.

This song is done in the typical styling of traditional Navajo social songs, minimal words in between long chants. Loosely translated, the song says:
  • 'Áháshinee' at'ééd!
    (Precious girl!)

    Oh, honey...

    Diit'ash lą́ą́!
    (Let us both go together!)
--Daybreak Warrior

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Theresa » Sat May 25, 2013 2:06 pm

Ahéhee’
Thank you

Our Navajo word for today is Thank You.

It’s good to point out that the Navajo ‘h’ sound is a lot more exasperated when followed by a short (and a short high tone) ‘e’. The second ‘h’ is less pronounced, or more in line with normal English usage.


http://navajowotd.com/post/28571346573/ahehee


~~~~~~~~~~~~
A great big Ahéhee’ to those who have already given to the Birthday Project...and another Ahéhee’ for those who will be giving before we close it for the year.
Ahéhee’, Ahéhee’, Ahéhee’!!! :airkiss:

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Buster » Sat May 25, 2013 5:12 pm

Hearing Ed Lee Natay sent me instantly back to the late 70's when I spent the summer on the Navajo Reservation near Chinle... Wonderful memories. Thanks, Theresa

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Theresa » Sat May 25, 2013 5:41 pm

Buster wrote:Hearing Ed Lee Natay sent me instantly back to the late 70's when I spent the summer on the Navajo Reservation near Chinle... Wonderful memories. Thanks, Theresa
I'm glad you enjoyed the song, Buster.

Thanks for your post. It's nice to know people are enjoying the thread.
:yellowdaisy:

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Theresa » Sun May 26, 2013 3:23 pm

K’aalógii
Butterfly

K’aalógii is the Navajo word for butterfly.

Here’s an interesting insight: k’aalógii was, traditionally, one of the first Navajo constellations, carried and set into the sky before Coyote scattered the rest of the stars by flinging them upwards.


http://navajowotd.com/post/30596288504/kaalogii

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Theresa » Mon May 27, 2013 12:44 pm

Be’eldííl Dah Sinil
Albuquerque

Today’s word is the Navajo place name for the New Mexico city (also spelled: Be’eldíílasinil, or Bee’eldííldahsinil).

Be’eldííl - that with which ringing is done/made (in reference to bells)

dah - held up, above

sinil - objects, in place (or position)

Early Navajo people noted either the large church bells or the municipal bells on the buildings in the area, and that’s how Albuquerque came to be known in Navajo. By now you should notice that Navajo place names, as a whole, are very descriptive.

As always, if you use a place in conversation, using the -di suffix (ex. Be’eldííldahsinildi) creates the phrase “at Albuquerque.”


http://navajowotd.com/post/30044539778/ ... -dah-sinil

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by Theresa » Tue May 28, 2013 2:09 pm

Nahasdzáán
The world, the earth

The English meaning of the Navajo word nahasdzáán is the world, or the earth.

Looking closer at the word, you’ll notice asdzáán, which takes on the meaning of woman, or female.

In this sense, the earth is being referred to as taking on a motherly role, nurturing life and helping it develop.


http://navajowotd.com/post/25180374695/nahasdzaan

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Re: BP 2013--Navajo Word of the Day

Unread post by SnoopyDances » Tue May 28, 2013 10:38 pm

I just love this thread!
It's such a beautiful language. I'm glad someone is recording all of these words and meanings so it doesn't get lost forever.

Thanks for sharing this with us Theresa! :thankyou: