Life Tidbit #34 ~ Meg Patterson

by Keith Richards & James Fox

Moderator: Liz

User avatar
Liz
ONBC Moderator
Posts: 12971
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 2:13 pm
Location: The Left Coast

Status: Offline

Life Tidbit #34 ~ Meg Patterson

Unread postby Liz » Sat Nov 12, 2011 9:21 pm

Pg. 395: Although I was getting clean under Meg Patterson's care, a cure imposed by the authorities lacks conviction in the heart. Meg's method was supposed to be the painless way out. Electrodes attached to your ear released endorphins, which, theoretically, canceled the pain. Meg also believed in alcohol--in my case Jack Daniel's, which is a strong brew--as a substitute, a diversion, let's say. So I drank heartily under Meg's maternal guidance. I was quite interested in Patterson's method. It did certainly help, but it was no fun. After it was finished, in a matter of two weeks or so, Immigration announced that they'd have to monitor me for another month.

Pg. 401: I made a d**n good attempt at cleaning up in 1977 with my black box and Meg Patterson and the rest, but for a brief time it didn't stick.



Image
Meg and Pete Townshend

Margaret Angus Ingram was born in Aberdeen, Scotland on November 9, 1922 to Alick Ingram and Maggie Nairn. She was the youngest of their five children. Theirs was a very religious home. Her father was a strict Plymouth Brethren, a sect that broke away from the established church, putting focus on the words of the Bible. Margaret was educated at the Central School in Aberdeen (now the Aberdeen Academy). As the leading scholar there for four years, she was accepted to Aberdeen University at the age of 16 to study Medicine and graduated MB, ChB when she was 21, one of the youngest doctors to do so. Her first job out of college was at Aberdeen Sick Children's Hospital. It is interesting to note that according to her second cousin, Jim Mann Taylor, the children at the hospital were given heroin for post-operative pain instead of morphine, and Margaret was curious as to how it quieted them. Apparently she got a nurse to give her a shot, which made her violently sick. That wouldn’t happen these days.

After Aberdeen Sick Children’s Hospital, she moved on to become House Surgeon at the Maternity Hospital before going on to St. James Hospital in Balham, London. She was one of only 20 women who obtained the FRCS (Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons at Edinburgh University) before 1950.

In 1948 she went to practice in Punjab, India, and later was made a Member of the Order of the British Empire for her hospital work there. It was here that she became known as Dr. Meg. In 1952, while vacationing on the Tibetan border she met her British husband, George Patterson, a journalist and also a Plymouth Brethren. "I was a notorious adventurer, and she was a famous saint," said George (People Magazine, August 11, 1986, Vol. 26, No. 6).

George and Meg were married in Aberdeen in 1953, returned to Tibet the same year and then from there to The Tea Planters' Hospital in Darjeeling, India. From there they moved to Hong Kong. It was here at Tung Wah Hospital that she encountered electro-acupuncture, which was being used by her colleague Dr. H. L. Wen to treat patients. Some of those patients (who happened to be opium or heroin addicts) claimed that this treatment had stopped their withdrawal symptoms. She observed the same for those addicted to cigarettes and alcohol. From this point on she dedicated her life to helping drug addicts and developing her NET treatment box.

Back in England, Dr. Meg experimented further, substituting electrodes for needles. The radical treatment, she insists, was markedly more effective than traditional drug rehabilitation. In 1980 she ran a clinic in Sussex for a year. She then started seeing patients privately. She has successfully treated hundreds of addicts, the most celebrated having been heroin abusers like Eric Clapton, Boy George, Keith, of course, and Pete Townshend, who frankly admitted, "If I hadn't gone to Meg, I'd be dead." (People Magazine)

How does NET (NeuroElectric Therapy) work? Using a tiny electrical current tuned to various frequencies, NET stimulates the production of several body chemicals—including endorphins, the body's natural opiates—enabling addicts of any drug to detoxify with only minimal withdrawal symptoms. The major advantage of Patterson's treatment is to speed the detoxification process, which normally requires a two-week hospital stay.

But NET is just the first step toward rehabilitation, Patterson emphasized in her book entitled Hooked? Counseling is mandatory to address "the underlying cause that produces the addiction in the first place." Patterson preferred Christian-oriented counseling, since addiction is "fundamentally a spiritual problem," but she supported other therapies as well. Following NET, she claimed, rehabilitation could take as little as two months.

Meg also wrote an autobiography entitled, Searching for the Impossible.

Meg died on July 25, 2002 after a long illness.

NET is still being used today. The current generation of NET devices are portable units the size of a digital audio player that carry their own power source (9-volt battery) and generate sequences of CES waveforms. The device output is fed to two small electrodes attached to the patient's head by adhesive means and located behind the ears. The electrodes provide transcutaneous delivery of current (i.e. they deliver current across the skin rather than piercing or being implanted beneath the skin). The device is worn continuously during treatment, typically lasting about one week. Individual treatment protocols are loaded into the device based on the mix of drugs taken by the patient and the time of day.

Current Models:

Image

Image


More about her clinical discoveries in regards to NET:



Some cool photos:





Sources:

Dr.Meg.net
loadsofpeople.co.uk
Netdevice.net
People Magazine, August 11, 1986, Vol. 26, No. 6
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

User avatar
stroch
Posts: 1301
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:41 pm
Location: New Orleans

Status: Offline

Re: Life Tidbit #34 ~ Meg Patterson

Unread postby stroch » Sat Nov 12, 2011 9:45 pm

"...in 1953 returned to Tibet..." What a wonderful thing to do. Would that her treatment worked, and was available to all. Love her daughter's name, name Myrrh, and her g'daughter's, Aisling.
I'll buy you the hat....a really big one.
St. Roch -- patron saint of pilgrims

User avatar
gemini
Posts: 3907
Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2006 9:28 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Status: Offline

Re: Life Tidbit #34 ~ Meg Patterson

Unread postby gemini » Sun Nov 13, 2011 3:09 am

When I read this I wondered about Net (Neuro Electric Therapy) and the photo of the machine looks very much like my EMG machine for Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation. Both seem to make a little electrical charge. I don’t know if I would want it near my head, I wonder if they are different voltage or a different type of voltage. Interesting that they still use it.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." Will Rogers

Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

User avatar
Gilbert's Girl
Posts: 162883
Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2004 3:14 am
Location: UK

Status: Offline

Re: Life Tidbit #34 ~ Meg Patterson

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Sun Nov 13, 2011 4:33 am

Another good tidbit and an interesting one although I had already seen her site etc so it wasn't new to me. I'm glad that in the end the therepy helped Keith even if it took a couple of goes and also helped Eric and Pete :ok: I think it was partley determination on their part too of course.

The pic of Keith in the red t-shirt is flipped btw always think its funny seeing flipped pics on web sites guess people are not careful enough when putting them up :lol:

User avatar
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
Posts: 10378
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Location: Austin

Status: Offline

Re: Life Tidbit #34 ~ Meg Patterson

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Nov 13, 2011 4:29 pm

Interesting tidbit. It's good that she could help these talented and creative people, as well as other. I find it curious that she encouraged drinking.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!

User avatar
Gilbert's Girl
Posts: 162883
Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2004 3:14 am
Location: UK

Status: Offline

Re: Life Tidbit #34 ~ Meg Patterson

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Sun Nov 13, 2011 6:05 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:Interesting tidbit. It's good that she could help these talented and creative people, as well as other. I find it curious that she encouraged drinking.

Perhaps she realised that addicts often need to replace one addiction with another. Maybe she thought drinking was a lesser of two evils. Mind it wasn't like he wasn't into the drink already.


Return to “Life”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests