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 Post subject: Public Enemies Tidbit #17 - The Wild, Wild West
PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 2:22 pm 
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Location: The Left Coast
TUCSON

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Pg. 199-203: Tucson, Arizona, a sun-baked desert city of thirty thousand people, was about as far from the Dillinger Gang’s Midwestern roots as they were likely to get…….Russell Clark was staying with Charles Makley at the city’s premiere place of lodging, the Congress Hotel…..Dillinger and Billie checked into a tourist court on South Sixth Street…..Things went smoothly until Tuesday morning around six, when a leaky oil furnace in the Congress Hotel’s basement caught fire……Wollard suspected, the rest of the Dillinger Gang was hiding. Making sure the three studied photographs of the other gang members, he told them to keep Makley’s Second Street bungalow under surveillance…..Just then a shiny new Hudson sedan rounded the corner and parked in front of the house.

Panoramic Tucson, Arizona. 1909:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v223/Liz-ONBC/Public%20Enemies/Out%20West/Tucson_old.jpg

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Tucson is the seat of Pima County, Arizona, located 118 miles southeast of Phoenix and 60 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border. As of July 1, 2006, a Census Bureau estimate puts the city's population at 518,956, with a metropolitan area population at 946,362.

The English name Tucson originates from the Spanish name of the city, Tucsón [tuk'son], which is itself borrowed from the O'odham (an Uto-Aztecan language of southern Arizona and northern Sonora where the Tohono O'odham and Pima reside) name for the city, Cuk Ṣon (roughly pronounced "chuk shon"), meaning "at the base of the black [hill]" a reference to an adjacent volcanic mountain. This mountain is formally named Sentinel Peak, better known as "A Mountain" because it sports a large letter A in honor of the University of Arizona. Tucson is sometimes referred to as "The Old Pueblo."

History

Tucson was probably first visited by Paleo-Indians, known to have been in southern Arizona by about 12,000 years ago. Recent archaeological excavations near the Santa Cruz River have located a village site dating from 4,000 years ago. The floodplain of the Santa Cruz River was extensively farmed during the Early Agricultural period, circa 1200 BC to AD 150. These people constructed irrigation canals and grew corn, beans, and other crops while gathering wild plants and hunting animals. The Early Ceramic period occupation of Tucson saw the first extensive use of pottery vessels for cooking and storage. The groups designated by archaeologists as the Hohokam lived in the area from AD 600-1450 and are known for their red-on-brown pottery.

Jesuit missionary Eusebio Francisco Kino visited the Santa Cruz River valley in 1692, and founded the Mission San Xavier del Bac about 7 miles upstream from the site of the settlement of Tucson in 1700. The Spanish established a presidio (fort) on August 20, 1775 and the town came to be called "Tucson." Tucson became a part of Mexico after Mexico gained independence from Spain in 1821. Following the Gadsden purchase in 1853, Tucson became a part of the United States of America, although the American military did not formally take over control of the community until March 1856. From August 1861, until mid-1862, Tucson was the capital of the Confederate Arizona Territory. Until 1863, Tucson and all of Arizona was part of New Mexico Territory. From 1867 to 1879, Tucson was the capital of Arizona Territory. The University of Arizona, located in Tucson, was founded in 1885.

By 1900, 7,531 people lived in the city. At about this time, the US Veterans Administration had begun construction on the present Veterans Hospital. Many veterans who had been gassed in World War I and were in need of respiratory therapy began coming to Tucson at this time, due to the clean dry air. The population increased gradually to 13,913 in 1910, 20,292 in 1920, and 36,818 in 1940. In 2006 the population of Pima County, in which Tucson is located, passed one million while the City of Tucson's population was 535,000.

During the territorial and early statehood periods, Tucson was Arizona's largest city and commercial area, whereas Phoenix was the seat of state government and agriculture. The establishment of Tucson Municipal Airport increased its prominence. By the 1920s-30s, Phoenix outgrew Tucson and has continued to expand. Tucson continues to grow, but at a slower pace.

Climate

Tucson has two major seasons, summer and winter; plus three minor seasons: fall, spring, and the monsoon.

Summer is characterized by low humidity, clear skies, and daytime high temperatures that exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit. The average overnight temperature ranges between 68 °F and 85 °F.

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Monsoon clouds blanket the Catalina Mountains
Photo by Karen Funk Blocher, August 2005.

The monsoon can begin any time from mid-June to late July, with an average start date around July 3. It typically continues through August and sometimes into September. During the monsoon, the humidity is much higher than the rest of the year. It begins with clouds building up from the south in the early afternoon followed by intense thunderstorms and rainfall, which can cause flash floods. Large areas of the city do not have storm sewers, so monsoon rains flood the main thoroughfares, usually for no longer than a few hours. A few underpasses in Tucson have "feet of water" scales painted on their supports to discourage fording by automobiles during a rainstorm. The evening sky at this time of year is often pierced with dramatic lightning strikes.

Fall lasts from late October to November or December. It is much like summer, and similarly dry, with days above 100 degrees typical into early October. Average daytime highs of 84 °F, with overnight lows of 55 °F, constitute typical fall weather.

Winters in Tucson are mild relative to other parts of the United States. Daytime highs in the winter range between 64 °F and 75 °F, with overnight lows between 30 °F and 44 °F. Although rare, snow has been known to fall in Tucson, usually a light dusting that melts within a day.

Spring begins in late February or March, and is characterized by rising temperatures and several weeks of vivid wildflower blooms. Daytime average highs range from 72 °F in March to 88 °F in May with average overnight lows in March of 45 °F and in May of 59 °F.

Economy

Much of Tucson's economic development has been centered around the development of the University of Arizona, which is currently the second largest employer in the city. Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, located on the southeastern edge of the city, also provides many jobs for Tucson residents. Its presence, as well as the presence of a US Army Intelligence Center (Fort Huachuca, the largest employer in the region in nearby Sierra Vista), has led to the development of a significant number of high-tech industries, including government contractors, in the area. Today, there are more than 1,200 businesses employing over 50,000 people in the high-tech industries of Southern Arizona.

Tourism is another major industry in Tucson, which has many resorts, hotels, and attractions. A significant economic force is middle-class and upper-class Sonorans, who travel from Mexico to Tucson to purchase goods that are not readily available in their country. In addition to vacationers, a significant number of winter residents, or "snowbirds", are attracted by Tucson's mild winters and contribute to the local economy. Snowbirds often purchase second homes in Tucson and nearby areas, contributing significantly to the property tax base. Other snowbirds and "perpetual travelers" can be seen in large numbers arriving in autumn in large RVs towing small cars.

Hotel Congress


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Hotel History from the hotel website:

In 1919, Hotel Congress was built to serve the growing cattle industry & railroad passengers of the Southern Pacific Line. The Congress of the 1920s was the perfect shelter for genteel travelers and high-rollers fresh from the East. Hotel Congress could have continued its charming existence as just another place of lodging for road weary guests, except that the date of January 22, 1934 has forever stamped its historical mark upon this edifice. A fire started in the basement of the hotel and spread up the elevator to the third floor. This fire led to the capture of one of the country’s most notorious criminals — John Dillinger.

After a series of bank robberies, the Dillinger gang came to Tucson to “lay low”. The gang resided on the third floor under aliases. After the desk clerk contacted them through the switchboard, (still in operation), the incognito gang escaped by aerial ladders. On the urgent request of the gang, and encouraged by a generous tip, two firemen retrieved their heavy luggage. It was later discovered that the bags contained a small arsenal and $23,816 in cash. Later, this astute fireman recognized the gang in True Detective Magazine. A stakeout ensued and they were captured at a house on North Second Avenue. In the space of five hours, without firing a single shot, the police of small town Tucson had done what the combined forces of several states and the FBI had tried so long to do. (Let’s not go there yet) When captured, Dillinger simply muttered, “Well, I’ll be damned!”


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The old Pusch building located on Congress Street in downtown Tucson was razed to make way for a new development. The building once housed the Grabe Electric where Charley Makley was pinched by the police while the gang hid out in Tucson.

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All that is left of the building.
Even though Tucson citizens did not want
the building to be torn down...progress won out in the end.
So long old Pusch building.

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927 North Second Avenue, the Tucson house where the Dillinger gang was captured. Dillinger was sitting on the porch next to the front door


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The Gang in Court

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The Women in Court

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The Arraignment

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The Tucson Cops



BABY FACE NELSON ON THE LAM


Due to lack of time and space I will not cover all of the areas to which Nelson traveled. However, each is indicated by a red dot on the following map:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v223/Liz-ONBC/Public%20Enemies/Out%20West/CAcopy.jpg

Pg. 104-105:

He reached to old friends in Roger Touhy’s gang, which is how he found himself several weeks later on a train in Reno, Nevada, holding in his pocket the phone number of a man the Touhys had said could take care of him: William Graham, the gambler who, with his partner, James McKay, all but controlled the city of Reno.

Nelson stepped off the train in Reno in March 1932. Using the alias “Jimmy Johnson,” he phoned Graham and told him who he was. After several weeks Graham sent Nelson on to San Francisco, where he arranged for him to work for a Sausalito bootlegger. Nelson worked as a guard on liquor shipments for six months. He and other men would meet ships in secluded coves in Marin County, watch as the crates were unloaded, then ride the trucks into San Francisco. On these missions he made two friends, a handsome simpleton named Johnny Chase and a roly-poly Italian named Joseph “Fatso” Negri. At the eight of Nelson’s notoriety in 1934, the two men would be his most trusted associates.


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Reno is the county seat of Washoe County, Nevada, United States. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 180,480, making it the second-largest city in Nevada. Current census estimates, however, show that although the city's population has grown to approximately 214,000, the city is now the third largest in the state, following Las Vegas and Henderson. Reno lies 26 miles north of the Nevada state capital, Carson City, and 22 miles northeast of Lake Tahoe in the high desert. The area of western Nevada and the California Sierra Nevada anchored by Reno has a population of approximately 650,000. Reno shares its eastern border with the city of Sparks. Reno, known as "The Biggest Little City in the World", is famous for its casinos, and is the birthplace of the gaming corporation Harrah's Entertainment. Reno residents are referred to as "Renoites."

In a nutshell, gold had been discovered in the vicinity of Virginia City in 1850 and a modest mining community developed, but the discovery of silver in 1859 led to one of the greatest mining bonanzas of all time as the Comstock Lode spewed forth treasure. The Comstock's closest connection to the outside world lay in the Truckee Meadows.

The extension of the Virginia and Truckee Railroad to Reno in 1872 provided another big boost to the new city's economy. At first citizens viewed the changes as an omen, however in the following decades, Reno continued to grow and prosper as a business and agricultural center and became the principal settlement on the transcontinental railroad between Sacramento and Salt Lake City.

As the mining boom waned early in the twentieth century, Nevada's centers of political and business activity shifted to the non-mining communities, especially Reno and Las Vegas, and today the former mining metropolises stand as little more than ghost towns. Despite this, Nevada is still the third-largest gold producer in the world, after South Africa and Australia; the state yielded 6.9 percent of the world's supply in 2005 world gold production.

Nevada's legalization of casino gambling in 1931 and the passage of liberal divorce laws created another boom for Reno. The divorce business eventually died as the other states fell in line by passing their own laws easing the requirements for divorce, but gambling continued as a major Reno industry. Beginning in the 1950s, the need for economic diversification beyond gaming fueled a movement for more lenient business taxation. The presence of a main east-west rail line, the emerging interstate highway system, favorable tax climate and relatively inexpensive land created the ideal conditions for warehousing and distribution of goods to the growing population in the surrounding eleven western states. Today, Reno has the largest concentration of distribution related property per capita in the United States.

Climate

Reno is situated in a high desert river valley of approximately 4,400 feet above sea level. Winter has snowfall but typically it is light. Summer highs are generally in the low to mid 90s (degrees Fahrenheit), but temperatures above 100°F occur occasionally. July daytime and nighttime temperatures average 92°F and 51°F, respectively; while January day and night temperatures average 46°F and 22°F, respectively. Most precipitation occurs in winter and spring.



Pg. 259:

While Dillinger crisscrossed Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, Baby Face Nelson headed west to Reno, where within days his homicidal tendencies embroiled him in a mystery it would take the FBI years to solve. Reno’s two crime bosses, Bill Graham and Jim McKay, were in the midst of fighting a federal mail-fraud case involving their support for a gang of con men that dlourished in the city. Somehow the two had learned that the government’s star witness against them was to be Roy Fritsch, the controller of a Reno bank Graham and McKay owned.

On Thursday, March 22, a week after the Mason City robber, Fritsch disappeared after parking his car near his home. An eyewitness later told the FBI he had seen two men hit Fritsch over the head and drag him to a waiting car. The crime has officially never been solved. But according to informants who spoke to the FBI in later years, the culprits were Nelson and his friend John Chase. According to FBI files, Nelson murdered Fritsch and dumped his corpse down a mineshaft. Fritsch’s body has never been found.


Roy Fritsch’s murder solved?:

http://www.nevadatravel.net/travelgram/07-07.html


CAL NEVA

Pg. 417:

July 23 – September 12, 1934

Two days later, Nelson’s little band left Chicago in two cars, driving west across Iowa. Sleeping at out-of-the-way tourist camps, they reached Reno two nights later. Skirting the city, Nelson drove to the Cal-Neva Lodge, rousting a gambler friend, Tex Hall. Nelson wanted a place to hide. “Can’t do it, Jimmy,” Hall said. “You’re too hot.”


Cal Neva Lodge & Casino sits on the beautiful north shore of Lake Tahoe, in the picturesque lake front community of Crystal Bay. Since 1926 Cal Neva Lodge & Casino has hosted generations of cherished guests, many world-famous entertainers, politicians and celebrities, including Frank Sinatra, who once owned Cal Neva Resort and Casino.

On its website it refers to itself as “the original hideout on the North Shore”.

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It is really referring to later gangsters such as Sam Giancana when it boasts of mafia and conspiracies.

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Cal Neva in the 30s

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Cal-Neva Lodge, Lake Tahoe, 1932
Burton Frasher Sr.
Pomona Public Library (both this and the above photo)


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Cal Neva today. The façade is the same, but they have added a high rise to the property.



Pg. 419: That’s what it meant. Crossing into Nevada the morning of August 9, Nelson’s band pulled up beside the Fallon Mercantile Store in Fallon, Nevada, Nevada, east of Reno……The following day Nelson found their new home, the Mount Grant Lodge, fourteen miles south of Hawthorne, Nevada, on the shores of Lake Walker.


FALLON

Fallon is a city in Churchill County, Nevada. The population was 7,536 at the 2000 census. But as of 2006 the population of Fallon, Nevada was 8,299. Fallon is primarily an agricultural community. Although the area is arid, approximately 50,000 acres of farmland are irrigated with water supplied by the Truckee-Carson Irrigation District. The principal crop is alfalfa. Fallon Heart O' Gold cantaloupes were once distributed throughout the nation, but are now mostly grown for local consumption. Naval Air Station Fallon also provides a significant employment.

U.S. Route 50 is the main road through town. Fallon is one of the westernmost cities on the Loneliest Road in America, the stretch of Route 50 through Nevada famed for its remoteness. Eastbound travelers must go 110 miles to find the next town, Austin, Nevada.

HAWTHORNE AND WALKER LAKE

Hawthorne is a census-designated place (CDP) in Mineral County, Nevada. The population was 3,311 at the 2000 census. The nearby Hawthorne Army Depot is the primary economic base of the town.

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Hawthorne, 1936

Walker Lake is a natural lake, 105 mi 253 in area, in the Great Basin in western Nevada. It is 18 mi long and 7 mi wide, located in northwestern Mineral County along the eastern side of the Wassuk Range, approximately 75 mi southeast of Reno. The lake is fed from the north by the Walker River and has no natural outlet except absorption and evaporation.

In the 19th century the area around the lake was inhabited by the Paiute. Extensive use of the water of the Walker River and its tributaries for irrigation since the late 19th century has resulted in a severe drop in the level of the lake. According the USGS, the level dropped approximately 140 ft (40 m) between 1882 and 1994. The lower level of the lake has resulted in a higher concentration of stream pollutants. As of 2004 the salt concentration is above the lethal limit for most of the native fish species throughout much of the lake, and extinction of the Lahontan cutthroat trout in the lake will occur soon if inflow is not drastically increased.

The Walker Lake State Recreation Area is located along the western shore of the lake. Walker Lake is a haven for boating, fishing, camping, hiking and birdwatching. Water skiing and personal watercraft are welcome along with quiet vessels such as canoes and kayaks - perfect for exploring the Walker River Delta or observing loons, grebes, and other waterbirds. Major beaches and campgrounds include Sportsman's Beach, Twenty Mile Beach, Tamarack and Walker Lake State Park. Come

The Hawthorne Army Depot, which claims to be the world's largest ammunition depot, fills the valley to the south of the lake. U.S. Route 95 passes along the western shore of Walker Lake.

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Walker Lake



Pg 471: All that October, Nelson remained in a drafty cabin at Wally Hot Springs, Nevada.



WALLEY’S HOT SPRINGS


Early tourism, in Nevada and elsewhere in the nation, often focused on the natural wonders of an area. The national parks that were created in the late 19th century, for example, attracted visitors interested in mountains, forests, and wildlife. Nevada didn't have a national park until 1987, but it had natural endowments that could contribute to the economy.

Natural hot springs and mineral baths were popular throughout the nation. One type of medical theory, known as hydropathy, claimed that mineral waters and hot springs could cure a variety of ailments. Walley's Hot Springs
(I’m not sure how it is spelled. I have seen it spelled with and without an “e”; and Burrough leaves out the “e” and the “s”), near Genoa, advertised the wonders of their healing baths in the 19th century.

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Nevada Historical Society
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David Walley’s Resort and Spa

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1946

Genoa, Nevada was the first settlement in the Nevada territory in 1850. The population of Genoa as of 2005 is 248. It is situated in the Carson Valley and is about 42 miles south of Reno, Nevada, 17 miles east of Tahoe and about 431 miles north of Vegas.

Genoa was first settled by Mormons from Utah, creating a fort on the Carson Pass trail between Sacramento and Utah. The original Mormon traders sold their fort in 1854 to a rancher. The town was the home to Nevada's first hotel, newspaper and court. Nevada's first newspaper, the Territorial Enterprise was founded in Genoa in 1858, but moved to Virginia City, Nevada in 1860. Another first for the state, the Genoa Bar, billed "Nevada's oldest thirst parlor", was patronized by Mark Twain, Teddy Roosevelt and Johnny Cash and was used in John Wayne and Clint Eastwood films.

Genoa, Nevada, unlike the city of Genoa, Italy, is pronounced with the accent on the second syllable: ge-NO-a.

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Job's Peak and the Carson Range from Walley's Hot Springs, Genoa, NV.
Taken by Scott Kooiman October 2006.




Pg. 417-419: Irritated, Nelson moved on, looking for refuge in his old Bay Area haunts…..The next morning everyone rendezvoused at a sprawling country inn, the Parente Hotel, in the wine-country town of El Verano outside Sonoma. The inn was owned by Louis Parente, a cousin of the bootlegger who had employed Nelson in Sausalito……That night the Nelsons camped in a field, while Negri went to a hotel in Napa…..His old haunts closed to him, Nelson stayed on the move, flitting between tourist camps in towns all across Northern California, in Caspar, Scotia, Eureka, Weaverville, and Sacramento, before heading south, staying in motels outside Salinas (my neck of the woods) and Stockton.

EL VERANO

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El Verano is a census-designated place (CDP) in Sonoma County, California. The population was 3,954 at the 2000 census, and its total area is 1.14 square miles.

Sonoma County is on the northwest coast of California, one of the northernmost parts of the greater San Francisco Bay Area. Its population at the 2000 census was 458,614. Its largest city and county seat is Santa Rosa.

Sonoma is the southwestern county of California's Wine Country region, which also includes Napa, Mendocino, and Lake counties. It has thirteen approved American Viticultural Areas and over 250 wineries. In 2002 Sonoma County ranked as the thirty-second county in the United States in agricultural production. As early as 1920 Sonoma County was ranked as the eighth most productive U.S county, largely due to the abundance of high quality irrigation water. More than 7.4 million tourists visit each year, spending more than $1 billion in 2006.

NAPA

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Napa County is a county located north of the San Francisco Bay Area. It is part of the Napa, California Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of 2000 the population is 124,279. The county seat is Napa (the town) . Napa County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood. Parts of the county's territory were given to Lake County in 1861. The word napa is of Native American derivation and has been variously translated as "grizzly
bear", "house", "motherland", "fish”. Of the many explanations of the name's origin, the most plausible seems to be that it is derived from the Patwin word napo meaning house, although local residents will often cite an urban legend that gives the translation as "you will always return".

Napa County, once the producer of many different crops, is known today for its wine industry, rising in the 1960s to the first rank of wine regions with France and Italy. Napa is a wine making region in the United States. The Napa wine country was the inspiration for the fictional Tuscany Valley on the nighttime soap opera Falcon Crest.

SAUSALITO

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Sausalito (Spanish for "little willow grove") is a city in the San Francisco Bay Area situated in Marin County*. The population was 7,330 as of the year 2000 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.2 square miles. 1.9 square miles of it is land and 0.3 square miles (15.18%) of which is under water.

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In the 1870s, the North Pacific Coast Railroad (NPC) extended its tracks southward to a new terminus in Sausalito, where a rail yard and ferry to San Francisco were established. The NPC was acquired by the North Shore Railroad in 1902, which in turn was absorbed in 1907 by the Southern Pacific affiliate, the Northwestern Pacific.

By 1926, a major auto ferry across the Golden Gate was established, running to the Hyde Street Pier in San Francisco. This ferry was an integral part of old U.S. Highway 101. It ceased operation shortly after the Golden Gate Bridge opened in May of 1937.

During World War II, a major shipyard of the Bechtel Corporation called Marinship was sited along the shoreline of Sausalito. The thousands of laborers who worked here were largely housed in a nearby community constructed for them called Marin City. The soil which supports this area is dredgings from Richardson Bay that were placed during World War II as part of the Marin shipyards for the United States Navy. A total of 202 acres were condemned by the government. A portion of this total area was formed in the shape of a peninsula and this peninsula became known as Schoonmaker Point.

Following World War II a lively waterfront community grew out of the abandoned ship yards. By the late '60s at least three house boat communities occupied the waterfront along and adjacent to Sausalito's shore. But beginning in the '70s, an intense struggle erupted between house boat residents and developers. It was dubbed the "House Boat Wars." Forced removals by county authorities and sabotage by some on the waterfront characterized this struggle. This long fight pitted the waterfront against the "Hill People" or the rich on the hill looking down on the water front. Today two house boat communities still exist: Gallilee Harbor in Sausalito and Waldo Point / Gate 6 just outside the city limit.

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In 1965, the City of Sausalito sued the County of Marin and a private developer for illegally zoning 2,000 acres of land to build a city named Marincello right next to Sausalito. The city won the lawsuit in 1970, and the land was transferred as open space to the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

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Located at the north end of the Golden Gate Bridge, Sausalito receives a steady stream of visitors via the bridge and a ferry service from San Francisco. It retains one of the few ungated marinas in the Bay Area that attracts visitors.

Trivia

• The Mason Distillery once made medicinal alcohol here.
• Sausalito is home to one of the largest houseboat communities on the West Coast. Former Bay Area radio and television host Don Sherwood spent his last years on a houseboat in Sausalito, where he died in 1983.
• In Jack Kerouac's On the Road, Sausalito is mentioned as "a little fishing village" and a joke is made about it being "filled with Italians."


*
A note for you HST fans: Marin County is (or was) home to Grace Slick (“White Rabbit”).


VALLEJO

Pg. 453:

All that September, Ed Guinane, the San Francisco SAC, built an inctricate superstructure atop Nelson’s contacts in California. There were taps in place on the phones of Fatso Negri’s mother and Johnny Chase’s brothers, and extensions at Tobe Williams’s gangland hospital in Vallejo.* Wanted posters were distributed up and down the California-Nevada border, Guinane felt certain Nelson was still in the area. He had been seen in Vallejo on September 26, by a man who had sold him a car the year before, and in a Reno tavern on September 29.

*An agent actually walked into the hospital and saw Chuck Fitzgerald, the Barker Gang member who was recovering from a gunshot would, on October 11. He failed to recognize him.


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West Vallejo and Mare Island

Vallejo is a city in Solano County, California, United States. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 116,760. It is located in the San Francisco Bay Area on the northern shore of San Pablo Bay.

Vallejo is home to the Six Flags Discovery Kingdom theme park (formerly Marine World and Marine World Africa USA) ; the now-defunct Mare Island Naval Shipyard; and the California Maritime Academy (part of the California State University system). Ferry service runs from a terminal on Mare Island Strait to San Francisco. Vallejo has twice served as the capital of the State of California--once in 1852 and again in 1853, both periods being quite brief. Some of the first Europeans drawn to the Vallejo area were attracted by the sulfur springs; in fact, in the year 1902 the area was named Blue Rock Springs.

Zodiac Killer

The Zodiac Killer was a serial killer who was active in Northern California during the 1960s. Two of his victims, Michael Renault Mageau, 19 (who survived) and Darlene Elizabeth Ferrin, 22, were attacked within the city limits of Vallejo at the Blue Rocks Springs Golf Course parking lot. His first confirmed victims, David Arthur Faraday, 17, and Betty Lou Jensen, 16, were killed on Lake Herman Road which goes through both Vallejo and Benicia, however, the victims were just inside the city limits of Benicia.

Both the Vallejo Police Department and San Francisco Police Department investigated the murders but were never able to solve the case. The case was marked inactive in April 2004 but was reopened before March 2007. The case also remains open in additional jurisdictions.


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Vintage linen real photo postcard looking West on Georgia St. in Vallejo CA in the late 1930’s.

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Today



_________________________________________________________
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 10:41 pm 
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Location: Austin
Tuscon hosts a "Dillinger Days" celebration every year!

http://www.downtowntucson.org/dillinger_days/

A look back at the 1930s with live music, tours, lectures, exhibits and action-packed re-enactments of the events leading up to the Dillinger gang’s Tucson capture in 1934.

The all-ages event also includes arts and crafts, antique cars, educational flourishes and food vendors.

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The public is encouraged to dress in 1930s garb to be “extras” in the re-enactments.

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The cornerstone of the event firmly rests on the live portrayals of Dillinger and his gang.

(Two acts, with the combination of them performed at 4pm.)

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LecturesTake place at Hotel Congress’ Copper Hall.
All run 1 hour.

10:30 am - A Nine Ring Legal Circus - Ten Eventful Days in Tucson History by Andy Dowdle.

1 pm - Three Women of Dillinger’s Days: Love, Loyalty & Loss by Ellen Poulsen

Author of "Don’t Call Us Molls: Women of the John Dillinger Gang"

3 pm - How the Tucson Fire Department Burned the Dillinger Gang by James Bleess

Historic Hotel Congress Tours

The hour-long tours take place at noon & 2:30 pm.
Meet in the Hotel Congress lobby.
Hit the Pavement with the Dillinger Gang in Downtown Tucson,

Exhibits

Arizona Historical Society Museum Downtown, 140 N. Stone Ave., features the gang’s confiscated arsenal, mug shots, articles and photos in an interpretive exhibit about the gang’s Tucson capture.

The Postal History Foundation showcases stamps of the 1930s. This pictorial history of the ’30’s includes the Depression, Dust Bowl, Prohibition, New Deal and more. A free take-home educational activity for children will be available in the Historic Train Depot lobby, 400 N. Toole Ave.

The Southern AZ Transportation Museum, 414 N. Toole Ave., shows the transportation aspects of the Dillinger gang’s Tucson "experience," from their arrival via automobile on a new national highway system to their extradition.



Walking Tours

The hour-long tours take place at noon & 2:30 pm.
Meet in the Hotel Congress lobby.
Hit the Pavement with the Dillinger Gang in Downtown Tucson,



_________________________________________________________
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:11 pm 
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Location: Olney, Maryland
Wow, Dillinger Days, DITHOT, that is cool! (But--January 19th--we just missed it.)

Liz, my brother has a shirt from Walley's Hot Springs that spells it with the e, and the logo on the shirt also has a little line drawing of those distinctive mountains in the photo. (And silly me, I didn't even connect his shirt with the place in the book until you put it in this tidbit.)


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:56 pm 
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Beautiful photos Liz. The old ones are very interesting but the new color ones are beautiful. That Babyface Nelson was the youngest and the meanest of the group in my opinion. He killed without any qualms but some (not all) of the others tried not to unless they were about to be caught. I thought it was strange that Nelson married young and drug his family around with him. He didn't seem like the type to be a family man. Actually Dillinger is my favorite of the bad guys even if he wasn't being played by Johnny.
I sort of liked Alan Karpis reading the book because he tried to think things through and not have any dangerous mistakes but he did kill without much remorse and his girlfreind was a teenager. These guys lived short fast lives but they sure got to see a lot of beautiful country.
.


Last edited by gemini on Thu Feb 28, 2008 9:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 12:22 am 
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fansmom wrote:
Wow, Dillinger Days, DITHOT, that is cool! (But--January 19th--we just missed it.)

Liz, my brother has a shirt from Walley's Hot Springs that spells it with the e, and the logo on the shirt also has a little line drawing of those distinctive mountains in the photo. (And silly me, I didn't even connect his shirt with the place in the book until you put it in this tidbit.)


Just another TZ moment, eh, Fansmom?

Dang! I can't believe that we just missed Dillinger Days. :banghead: If anyone was there, please tell us what you thought?

Gemini, I see many topics for discussion there in our future.



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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 8:45 am 
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Time to start planning out trip for next year, fansmom! :cool:



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PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2008 3:50 pm 
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Wow! Those climate details for Reno and Nevada are amazing. No wonder folks are moving here, if they read that.
Got 2 feet of snow last night and the temps have been in the teens every night in January.
Boy those boys sure got all over this country. . .dodging the law, looking for "safe" places to land. what a life. You have money but are always looking over your shoulder.

And to find the Tuscon reinactment! wow, again. Just like them to do that, like they have the shoot out of the Earps, Doc Holliday and the Outlaws every year too ! (in Tombstone, near by Tuson )



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PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2008 5:55 pm 
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Lady Jill, I'm getting the impression that it is colder everywhere in the US this year. Try to stay warm. Cuddle up next to a fire with Public Enemies.



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PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2008 7:39 pm 
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Don't know how I missed this tibdit :blush: ---- some really beautiful country out west !!!

Dillinger Day's -- how cool it that !!!!!!!!!!! :dance: I hope someone might have attended and can give us the "details".

Gemini, I agree about Dillinger being my favorite. I recall commentray from the History Channel broadcast that Dillinger was generally "kind" i.e. not wanting to kill anyone.... he appeared truly saddened with the death of a security officer when "the gang" broke him out of jail. Good Man... well, except for the bank robber in him. :lol:



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PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2008 8:18 pm 
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Yes, Liz, I think that is true. I have spent the whole day shoveling snow to get to my wood pile, ponies, garden hose to water said ponies and my driveway ( dirt!).

Wonder how they got around in snow in the 30's when those cars broke down so much??? Must have been in Reno in the summer!



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 9:05 pm 
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Just an update on Vallejo, CA, which was covered in this tidbit.....

The city cut a last minute deal tonight with the labor unions that will keep the city from going into bankruptcy--at least for the moment.



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:51 pm 
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That's interesting, Liz. I know at one time they made ships on Mare Island, but then it became a storage place for the "mothball fleet", now I don't know. Does the unions have anything to do with whats' happened on Mare Island?

I lived in Marin and Sonoma counties a long time - 70's - '80s.

Lady Jill

P. S. Now I know all about Wally's Hot Springs and Walker Lake/Hawthorne. and they are filming in Reno next month ( I put in for as an extra with my 1969 Ford truck "Gilbert" ) the Joe Comforte story with Helen Murrin!



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 29, 2008 1:01 am 
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Lady Jill wrote:
That's interesting, Liz. I know at one time they made ships on Mare Island, but then it became a storage place for the "mothball fleet", now I don't know. Does the unions have anything to do with whats' happened on Mare Island?

I lived in Marin and Sonoma counties a long time - 70's - '80s.

Lady Jill

P. S. Now I know all about Wally's Hot Springs and Walker Lake/Hawthorne. and they are filming in Reno next month ( I put in for as an extra with my 1969 Ford truck "Gilbert" ) the Joe Comforte story with Helen Murrin!


Are they filming at Wally's Hot Springs or just Reno? I love Marin County & Sonoma Counties, but spent most of my time in Solano and Yolo Counties--lived in Davis for 5 years. The Mothball Fleet happens to be in the Suisun Bay, which is between Benicia, Antioch and Martinez. It is further inland. The Carquinas Straight drains from Suisun Bay into the San Francisco Bay. Vallejo is on the Carquinas, but very close to the SF Bay. You can see the fleet while crossing the Benicia Bridge. It's rather eerie to look at them.



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 29, 2008 1:21 am 
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Liz wrote:
Lady Jill wrote:
That's interesting, Liz. I know at one time they made ships on Mare Island, but then it became a storage place for the "mothball fleet", now I don't know. Does the unions have anything to do with whats' happened on Mare Island?

I lived in Marin and Sonoma counties a long time - 70's - '80s.

Lady Jill

P. S. Now I know all about Wally's Hot Springs and Walker Lake/Hawthorne. and they are filming in Reno next month ( I put in for as an extra with my 1969 Ford truck "Gilbert" ) the Joe Comforte story with Helen Murrin!


Are they filming at Wally's Hot Springs or just Reno? I love Marin County & Sonoma Counties, but spent most of my time in Solano and Yolo Counties--lived in Davis for 5 years. The Mothball Fleet happens to be in the Suisun Bay, which is between Benicia, Antioch and Martinez. It is further inland. The Carquinas Straight drains from Suisun Bay into the San Francisco Bay. Vallejo is on the Carquinas, but very close to the SF Bay. You can see the fleet while crossing the Benicia Bridge. It's rather eerie to look at them.


Your right. . I was thinking that was Mare Island you saw from the Benicia Bridge. But yes, the Mothball Fleet, I've seen and they look strange.

They are filming in Reno and ( I think ) out in the Truckee River canyon at the Sagebrush Ranch. Helen is playing the Madam!
Those bank robbers saying they lived in a drafty cabin at Wally's made me laugh. The hot springs are superb and would have kept them toasty warm all winter!



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