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 Post subject: PE Tidbit #22 ~ Chicago and its Environs
PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 6:20 pm 
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Unfortunately, I was not able to find the actual pictures of many of the places mentioned in the book. But I was able to find their locations on the map.

Map of Illinois (red dots indicate places of significance):



Map of Chicago (see red dots):





Pg. 144: The Dillinger Gang returned to Chicago just after the Barker Gang left to escape the dragnet spreading in the wake of the Federal Reserve fiasco.

Pg. 156: In Chicago, Dillinger and Pete Pierpont decided to live together with Frechette and Mary Kinder, renting a four-room apartment at 4310 Clarendon Avenue on the North Side…..Most afternoons the two couples went out driving, stopping at shops up and down State Street to buy new clothes……When they weren’t shopping, the four could usually be found at a dentist’s office on Washington Avenue (it appears to be called Washington Blvd. now) , enduring a numbing series of cappings and fillings…..Afterward they would hit a restaurant and then a nightclub, usually the College Inn or the Terrace Garden.


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Hotel Sherman, 1920


The Hotel Sherman (located at the north side of Randolph Street between Clark and LaSallere) mained one of Chicago's premier night spots through the 1910s and 1920s, attracting celebrities, tourists, and members of high society. It was during this period that the College Inn restaurant, with the help of band leader Isham Jones, became a notable jazz venue. Jones broke with the genteel tradition of violin-based hotel performance when he replaced many of his orchestra's waltz-oriented numbers with new, jazz-inspired tunes. Though there were critics of the change, most of the restaurant's patrons applauded the livelier arrangements and the freer dance styles they encouraged.

Though the tunes played by Isham Jones and his all-white jazz orchestra were tame in comparison to those heard in the racially mixed cabarets of the South Side, they nonetheless gave many white Chicagoans their first taste of jazz. To be sure, the College Inn was an especially important fixture in Chicago's growing jazz scene. There, amid the refined surroundings of the Hotel Sherman, jazz sounds migrated from the city's African-American neighborhoods into the center of white society. For black musicians, however, the popularization of jazz music among white Chicagoans was a mixed blessing, since discriminatory hiring practices excluded them from joining the orchestras at the city's white hotels. Hotel managers feared that patrons of venues like the College Inn would object to listening and dancing to jazz music if it were performed by black musicians.

Terrace Garden Postcards from the 20s:

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The Terrace Garden restaurant, located on the first floor of the Morrison Hotel at Clark and Madison in downtown Chicago, offered patrons live music and dancing with their lavish meals. In the 1920s when this picture was taken, the Morrison advertised itself as the focus of Chicago's downtown life. The restaurant was razed in 1965 for the construction of the First National Bank Building.



Pg. 158-160: And so Huntington and Sergeant Howe found themselves, in a Loop cafeteria that afternoon when a car driven by a man who looked very much like John Dillinger plucked McGinnis off a nearby corner. Three hours later McGinnis phoned. He had driven around Chicago all afternoon with Dillinger and had dozens of stories to relate. Almost offhandedly, he mentioned that Dillinger was suffering a case of barber’s itch, an inflammation of hair follicles. McGinnis had arranged for him to visit a doctor named Charles Eye, who worked from offices around the corner from McGinnis’s apartment, on Keeler Avenue just below Irving Park Boulevard…….A fourth car driven by a Chicago detective named Howard Harder, parked across Irving Park Boulevard, fifty yards behind the waiting Essex. They had Dillinger in a box….Dillinger screeched onto Elston Avenue.

From the John Dillinger Scrap Book Photos site:

Clarendon Ave. Hideout Of Dillinger & Pierpont In Chicago Today
{Courtesy: Estella Cox}:

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Doctor's Office On Irving Park Blvd. Where Dillinger Escaped Police Trap In Chicago
{Courtesy: Estella Cox}
(I’m assuming this is Dr. Eye’s Office):

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Pg. 261-263:

Chicago, Illinois
The Irving Hotel, Room 234

Fred Barker sat at the table in his pajamas. Dr. Joseph Moran, his eyes rheumy and bloodshot, leaned over and grasped his fingers, a scalpel already in his hand….. The moved into a Winthrop Avenue boardinghouse to recuperate...



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4849 W Irving Park Rd
Chicago, IL 60641


I think this might be the intersection in which the hotel is located:

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Pg 287: Afterward Dillinger drove downtown to the U Tavern on State Street….and they agreed to meet at a bar called the Tumble Inn at 8:00…..Dillinger slid his Ford down Austin Street and pulled to the curb beside the tavern.

Pg. 323: It got worse when Purvis returned to the Bankers Building that afternoon.


The Bankers Building is located in “The Loop” neighborhood in downtown Chicago, bordering South Clark St., West Adams St. and West Quincy. Finished in 127, it is 476 ft. tall, with 41 floors. The top of the building is capped with a very high communications antenna. It is the tallest building in Chicago with continuous brick cladding:

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1929

Image
Today


Pg. 388: That same day, July 4, Dillinger moved into an apartment at 2420 North Halsted Street, in a German-immigrant neighborhood on the North Side. Three other people lived in the apartment, two of them women…..One of the women was Dillinger’s new girlfriend Polly Hamilton, a twenty-six-year-old divorcee who waitressed at the S&S Café on Wilson Avenue. The other was Ana Sage

Pg. 496-97:

Surf Lane Apartments
6:30 P.M.

It was a mild January evening, the temperature in the upper thirties. Old snow gray gritty, clogged the gutters and lined the sidewalks. A dozen agents lingered at spots all around the building Connelley had left orders to await the raid at 3920 Pine Grove unless the man they believed was Dock Barker attempted to leave…..

3920 Pine Grove Avenue
11:00 P.M.

The night stretched on. The occupants of Apartment One North hadn’t been seen since 6:45….


Pg. 552: Baby Face Nelson’s grave feels cold and functional. Buried beside an access road at the St. Joseph’s Cemetery in the River Grove section of Chicago, Nelson lies between his wife, Helen, and his mother, beneath a string of five identical blue-gray markers.

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CHICAGO


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1915

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Today

Chicago is the largest city in the state of Illinois and the largest in the Midwest. With a population of nearly 3 million people, Chicago is the third largest city in the United States. It is the anchor of the Chicago metropolitan area, commonly called Chicagoland, which has a population of over 9.7 million people in Illinois, Wisconsin and Indiana, making it the third largest metropolitan area in the U.S.

The City of Chicago is located almost entirely in Cook County, with a small portion of O'Hare International Airport overlapping into DuPage County. The metropolitan area extends over several counties. Located at the site of a portage between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River watershed, Chicago was incorporated as a city in 1837. It rapidly became a major transportation hub, as well as the business, financial, and cultural capital of the Midwest. Since the Chicago World's Fair of 1893, the city has been regarded as one of the ten most influential in the world.

History

The name Chicago is the French rendering of the Miami-Illinois name shikaakwa, meaning “wild leek”. Etymologically, the sound /shikaakwa/ in Miami-Illinois literally meant "striped skunk", and referred to wild leek, or the smell of onions, metaphorically. It was initially applied to the river, and came to denote the site of the present city later. The sound "Chicago" is the result of a French mis-transcription of the original sound.

Chicago in its first century was one of the fastest growing cities in the world. Within the span of only forty years, its population grew from slightly under 30,000 to over 1 million by 1890. In the next forty years the population tripled to over 3 million. By the close of the 19th century, Chicago was the fifth largest city in the world.

Starting in 1848, the city became an important transportation center between the eastern and western United States. Chicago’s first railway, Galena and Chicago Union Railroad, opened. The Illinois and Michigan Canal allowed steamboats and sailing ships on the Great Lakes to connect through Chicago to the Mississippi River. A flourishing economy brought many new residents from rural communities and Irish American, Polish American, Swedish American, German American and numerous other immigrants. The city’s manufacturing and retail sectors dominated the Midwest and greatly influenced the American economy, with the Union Stock Yards dominating the meat packing trade.

Beginning in 1855, Chicago constructed the first comprehensive sewer system in the U.S., requiring the level of downtown streets to be raised as much as 10 feet (3 m). However, the untreated sewage and industrial waste flowed from the Chicago River into Lake Michigan, polluting the primary source of fresh water for the city. The city responded by tunneling two miles (3 km) out into Lake Michigan to newly built water cribs. Nonetheless, spring rains continued to carry polluted water as far out as the water intakes. In 1900, the problem of sewage was largely resolved when Chicago undertook an innovative engineering feat. The city actually reversed the flow of the river with the construction of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal leading to the Illinois River which joins the Mississippi River.

After the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 destroyed a third of the city, including the entire central business district, Chicago experienced rapid rebuilding and growth. During Chicago's rebuilding period, the world's first skyscraper was constructed in 1885 using steel-skeleton construction.

In 1893, Chicago hosted the World's Columbian Exposition on former marshland at the present location of Jackson Park. The Exposition drew 27.5 million visitors, and is considered among the most influential world's fairs in history. The University of Chicago had been founded one year earlier in 1892 on the same location. The term "midway" for a fair or carnival referred originally to the Midway Plaisance, a strip of park land that still runs through the University of Chicago campus and connects Washington and Jackson Parks.

The city was the site of labor conflicts and unrest during this period, which included the Haymarket affair on May 4, 1886. Concern for social problems among Chicago’s lower classes led Jane Addams to be a co-founder of Hull House in 1889, the first of what were called settlement houses. Programs developed there became a model for the new field of social work. The city also invested in many large, well-landscaped municipal parks, which also included public sanitation facilities.

The 1920s brought notoriety to Chicago as gangsters, including the notorious Al Capone, battled each other and law enforcement on the city streets during the Prohibition era. The 1920s also saw a major expansion in industry. The availability of jobs attracted African Americans from the South. They arrived by the tens of thousands in the Great Migration, contributing food, music and soul to a new cosmopolitan culture that made Chicago a center of jazz and blues, and great food. Their work helped build Chicago in numerous ways.

In 1933, Mayor Anton Cermak was assassinated while in Miami with President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

On December 2, 1942, physicist Enrico Fermi conducted the world’s first controlled nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago as part of the top-secret Manhattan Project.

Mayor Richard J. Daley was elected in 1955, in the era of machine politics. Starting in the 1960s, many upper- and middle-class citizens started leaving the city for the suburbs, as was the case in many cities across the country. It took the heart out of many residential neighborhoods, leaving impoverished and disadvantaged citizens behind. Structural changes in industry caused heavy losses of jobs for lower skilled workers.

The city hosted the tumultuous 1968 Democratic National Convention, which featured physical confrontations both inside and outside the convention hall, including full-scale police riots in city streets. Major construction projects, including the Sears Tower (which in 1974 became the world’s tallest building, at 110 stories), McCormick Place, and O'Hare Airport, were undertaken during Richard J. Daley's tenure. When he died, Michael Anthony Bilandic was mayor for three years. His loss in a primary election has been attributed to the city’s inability to properly plow city streets during a heavy snowstorm. In 1979, Jane Byrne, the city’s first female mayor, was elected. She popularized the city as a movie location and tourist destination.

In 1983 Harold Washington became the first African American to be elected to the office of mayor, in one of the closest mayoral elections in Chicago. Washington’s term in office saw new attention given to poor and minority neighborhoods. His administration reduced the longtime dominance of city contracts and employment by ethnic whites.

Current mayor Richard M. Daley, son of the late Richard J. Daley, was first elected in 1989. He has led many progressive changes to the city, including improving parks; creating incentives for sustainable development, including green roofs; and major new developments. Since the 1990s, the city has undergone a revitalization in which some lower class neighborhoods have been transformed into pricey neighborhoods as new middle class residents have settled in the city.

Neighborhoods

Regionally, Chicago can be divided by the river and its branches into three main sections: the North Side, the South Side, and the West Side. In the late 1920s the city was subdivided into 77 "community areas" by sociologists at the University of Chicago. The boundaries of the community areas are better defined than those of the over 210 neighborhoods throughout the city, allowing for better year-by-year comparisons. Hopefully you can pick out the neighborhoods by looking at my map, although I did not break them out.

Downtown and The Loop

The downtown area, lying somewhat roughly between Division Street on the north, Lake Michigan on the east, Roosevelt Road on the south and DesPlaines Avenue on the west, is the main commercial and cultural section of the city and includes the city's tallest buildings. In recent years, downtown has become so popular it has taken on the additional role as a residential enclave, with a high number of residents living there. The area of the Loop, located within downtown, was named for a circuit of cable cars and later for the elevated train Loop where practically all branches of the CTA elevated and subway trains lead. Some of downtown's commercial, cultural, and financial institutions are located in the Loop. The Chicago Bears of the NFL also play downtown, in Soldier Field.

North Side

The city's North Side (extending north of downtown along the lakefront) is the most densely populated residential section of the city. It contains public parkland and beaches stretching for miles along Lake Michigan to the city's northern border. Much of the North Side reaped the benefits of an economic boom which began in the 1990s. For example, the River North area, located just north of the Chicago River and the Loop, has undergone a transition from a warehouse district to an active commercial, residential, and entertainment hub, featuring the city's largest concentration of contemporary art galleries. Just west of River North's galleries and bistros, demolition of the CHA's Cabrini-Green housing project began in 2003, being replaced by upscale townhomes.

South Side

The South Side (extending south of downtown along Lake Michigan) is the largest section of the city, encompassing roughly 60% of the city's land area. The section along the lake is marked with public parkland and beaches. The South Side has a higher ratio of single-family homes and also contains most of the city's industry.

Along with being the largest section of the city in terms of geography, the South Side is also home to two of the city's largest parades: the annual Bud Billiken Day parade, which is held during the second weekend of August and celebrates children returning to school, and the South Side Irish Parade, which is held the weekend of St. Patrick's Day.

The South Side has two of Chicago's largest public parks. Jackson Park, which hosted the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893, is currently the site of the Museum of Science and Industry. The park stretches along the lakefront, linking the neighborhoods of Hyde Park and South Shore. Washington Park, which is connected to Jackson Park by the Midway Plaisance, is currently being considered as the primary site of the Olympic Stadium for the 2016 Summer Olympics if Chicago wins the bid.

West Side

The West Side (extending west of downtown) is made up of neighborhoods such as Austin, Lawndale, Garfield Park, West Town, and Humboldt Park among others. Some neighborhoods, particularly Garfield Park and Lawndale, have socio-economic problems including urban decay and crime. Other West Side neighborhoods, especially those closer to downtown, have been experiencing a rise in property value.

West Side parks includes Douglas Park, Garfield Park, and Humboldt Park. Garfield Park Conservatory houses one of the largest collections of tropical plants of any U.S. city. Other attractions on the West Side include the United Center (home of the Chicago Bulls of the NBA and Chicago Blackhawks of the NHL), Humboldt Park's Puerto Rican Day festival, and the National Museum of Mexican Art in Pilsen.

Culture and Contemporary Life

The city's waterfront allure and nightlife has attracted residents and tourists alike. Over one-third of the city population is concentrated in the lakefront neighborhoods (from Rogers Park in the north to Hyde Park in the south). The North Side has a large gay and lesbian community. Two North Side neighborhoods in particular, Lakeview and the Andersonville area of the Edgewater neighborhood, are home to many LGBT businesses and organizations. The area adjacent to the North Side intersection of Halsted and Belmont is a gay neighborhood known to Chicagoans as "Boystown." The city has many upscale dining establishments as well as many ethnic restaurant districts. These include "Greektown" on South Halsted, "Little Italy" on Taylor Street, just west of Halsted, "Chinatown" on the near South Side, "Little Seoul" on and around Lawrence Avenue, a cluster of Vietnamese restaurants on Argyle Street and South Asian (Indian/Pakistani) on Devon Avenue.

Media

Chicago is the third-largest media market in North America (after New York City and Los Angeles). Each of the big four (CBS, ABC, NBC, and FOX) United States television networks directly owns and operates stations in Chicago. WGN-TV, which is owned by the Tribune Company, is carried (with some programming differences) as "Superstation WGN" on cable nationwide. Chicago Public Radio produces programs such as PRI's This American Life and NPR's Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!.
And last, but not least, let us not forget the other Oprah and her book club are filmed in Chicago.

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Johnny’s appearance 11/04


FOX RIVER GROVE


Pg. 298: While Purvis’s men questionsed Anna Steve that Friday, Dillinger returned to Chicago and found refuge at a place that should no longer have been safe: Luis Cernocky’s Cyrstal Ballroom in Fox River Grove.

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Fox River Grove is a village in the Cuba Township of Lake County and the Algonquin Township of McHenry County, Illinois, United States. The population was 4,862 at the 2000 census.

History

Fox River Grove is home to Windy City Balloon Port, whose hot air balloons float along the Fox River. The same location is the home of the Norge Ski Club, which has been in existence since 1905. The Norge Ski Club is the oldest, continuously open ski club in the United States.

Fox River Grove Level Crossing Accident

On October 25, 1995, a Metra passenger train, running express towards Chicago, collided with a Cary-Grove High School school bus, killing seven high school students. The accident brought reform and increased safety standards nationwide of signalled rail crossings located very near street and highway intersections which are regulated by traffic signals, also known as interconnected crossings.


AURORA


Pg. 330: Meanwhile, Joie O’Brien drove to suburban Aurora, thirty miles west of downtown Chicago, and retrieved Volney Davis, who had been living in an Aurora apartment for several weeks. Everyone gathered that night in a parking lot behind the Seafood Inn, a restaurant in suburban Elmhurst.

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Aurora is the largest city in Kane County, Illinois. The city also lies within Dupage, Kendall,and Will counties. As reported in the 2000 U.S. census, the city was home to 142,990 people, while the city's estimated 2007 population is 175,952. About 110,000 of the city's residents reside in Kane County, while about 42,000 live in DuPage County. Only a few thousand Aurorans are in Will and Kendall Counties.

The city refers to itself as "The City of Lights" because it was one of the first communities to adopt all-electric street lighting (in 1881). The nickname was adopted in 1908. In fact, the name Aurora itself means dawn. Aurora is the second largest city in Illinois.

History

Before white settlers arrived, there was an Indian village in what is today downtown Aurora. In the early 1830's, the McCarty brothers arrived and initially owned land on both sides of the river, but sold their lands on the west side, living and operating their mill on the east side. Aurora was originally two towns: McCarty Mills on the east side and Hartford on the west side of the Fox River. McCarty Mills was named for founders Samuel and Joseph McCarty. McCarty Mills eventually incorporated as Aurora, and Hartford incorporated as West Aurora. The name of Aurora was chosen because the Aurora Borealis, or "Northern Lights", were shimmering fantastic hues of greens and blues high above the night sky on the eve of a then-popular festival called Dairy Days. To this day, Aurora is one of few cities with official colors (of blue and green) due to this event. The two sides became one in 1835. The Aurora Fire Department was established in 1856, and took ownership of its first fire engine that year. The city incorporated in 1857. The two sides couldn’t agree on which side of the river should house the public buildings, so most buildings were built on or around Stolp Island in the middle of the Fox River. A parking garage stands at the site of the original City Hall and Post Office. The two towns leave a legacy of rivalry between the East and West which is mostly enacted through a high school football/basketball rivalry. This is the oldest high school rivalry in the state of Illinois. As the city grew, many factories and jobs came to Aurora, along with many people. Aurora was and still is the main economic center of the Fox Valley Area. Aurora was a manufacturing powerhouse until 1974, when the railroad shops began to close. Soon many other factories and industrial areas became vacant. By 1980, there were few operating industrial areas in the city. Unemployment was over 15 percent. Before things got too out of hand, the city approved the Hollywood Casino Aurora. The casino brought redevelopment to the downtown area as well as the residential areas around it. It also brought the building of several business and industrial parks on the outsides of the city. Today many of the old factories have been reoccupied as warehouses, although several large inner city factories remain vacant.

History of Entertainment

Aurora has a rich history of entertainment. There were several theaters in the downtown area and several large community parks with baseball stadiums, circus acts, and race tracks. Some of its former theaters were:

• Coulter Opera House
• Evans Grand Opera House
• Bijou Theater/Star Theater
• Aurora Coliseum/Fox Theater
• The Strand Theater
• Sylvandell Dance Hall/Rialto Theater
• Tivoli Theater
• Paramount Arts Center (which is still open)
• New Fox Theater
• Isle Theater
• Coliseaum Theater

Economy

Aurora is on the edge of the Illinois Technology and Research Corridor. The city has a long tradition of manufacturing, making it an industrial center that could stand alone, separate from Chicago. Prominent manufacturers, past and present, included: Lyon Workspace Products, The Aurora Silver Plate Manufacturing Company, Barber Greene Ltd., the Chicago Corset Company, the Aurora Brewing Company, Stephens-Adamson Company, Caterpillar Incorporated, Allsteel Metals, and Western Wheeled Scraper Works (later Austin-Western Inc.). Olsson Roofing Company, Inc. was started in 1914 and is one of the oldest companies in the city. The most prominent employer and industry was the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad (later Burlington Northern) which was headquartered in Aurora. The CB&Q Roundhouse is still standing, and is now the popular restaurant Walter Payton’s Roundhouse.

Aurora in popular culture

• Wayne's World (1992) The movie was not filmed in Aurora, but was about two men, Wayne Campbell (Mike Myers), and Garth Algar (Dana Carvey) who lived in Aurora .
• Prison Break The hit FOX Network TV show has several references about Aurora, sometimes multiple times in an episode, as the show is filmed in the area.
• Recently, Kentucky Governor Ernie Fletcher used Aurora in an anti-casino ad in his re-election campaign. Governor Fletcher referred to Aurora as a good town gone bad, because of the casino. Contradictory to the ad, the casino may have been the one thing that saved Aurora during its industrial recession of the 1980s.
• The 2002 Film Children on Their Birthdays was filmed in a large Victorian-era home on Aurora's west side, although the story is supposed to have taken place in Alabama.


WAUCONDA


Pg. 342: After Little Bohemia, Murray allowed Nelson to stay in a cottage he owned in Wauconda, northwest of the city, where Nelson would spend most of the month of May. There he eventually reunited with Carroll and his California gofer, Johnny Chase.

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Wauconda is a village in Lake County, Illinois, United States. The population was 9,448 at the 2000 census, and estimated to be 10,903 in 2005. As of August, 2007, Wauconda's population is slightly over 12,000.

Traditions say that Wauconda was named for an Indian Chief by that name, who is buried somewhere on the southern bank of Bangs Lake, where the town hall was later built. The word translated from its Indian language means “Spirit Water.”

Blues Brothers was partially filmed in the village.


CRYSTAL LAKE


Pg: 470: The day after Floyed was killed, Tuesday, October 23, Cowley had Backman (Sally, Floyd’s GF) flown to Chicago in hopes that a tour of northern Illinois and Wisconsin might refresh her memory. Charles Winstead took two agents and drove her. They headed northwest out of Chicago on Highway 1, inspecting the Illinois towns of Crystal Lake, Harvard, and Woodstock.…

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Crystal Lake is a city located in southeastern McHenry County in northeastern Illinois. It is named after Crystal Lake, a 230 acre lake 1.6 miles west-southwest of downtown. The population was 38,000 at the 2000 census, making it the biggest city in McHenry county.


HARVARD

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Harvard is a city in McHenry County, Illinois, United States. The population was 7,996 at the 2000 census, and estimated to be 9,104 as of 2005.

Dairy farming was big in Harvard. In 1942, Harvard instituted an annual celebration called Harvard Milk Days. A lavish parade down whitewashed streets presided over by a large fiberglass Holstein cow named (since 1970) Harmilda attracted thousands. Dairy farming declined as farmers found it easier and equally profitable to supply metropolitan Chicago's supermarkets with produce.


WOODSTOCK

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Woodstock Opera House

Woodstock, not to be confused with the infamous location of the rock fest of 1969, is a city in McHenry County, Illinois. The population was 20,151 at the 2000 census, and estimated to be 23,241 as of 2006. It is the county seat of McHenry County.

It is the home of the historical Woodstock Opera House and Old McHenry County Courthouse. Woodstock was named in 2007 as one of the nation's Dozen Distinctive Destinations 2007 by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Some of its annual traditions and festivals:

• Dick Tracy Days
o Every summer, Woodstock hosts "Dick Tracy Days" to celebrate the work of one of its most famous residents, Chester Gould, the artist who created for the Chicago Tribune and its syndication business, possibly the most famous newspaper cartoon series ever created.
• Diversity Day Festival
• Fair Diddley
• Farmers market
• Festival of Lights
• Groundhog Days
o The town celebrates "Groundhog Days" at the beginning of every February, including tours of famous filming sites from the movie since Woodstock was the primary filming location for the 1993 movie Groundhog Day (although the fictional events of the movie take place in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania). The town now even has its own groundhog named "Woodstock Willie", who essentially performs the same tasks as "Punxsutawney Phil" at the site of the original Groundhog Day festival. Every year on the weekend of Groundhog Day, the Classic Cinemas Woodstock Theater shows Groundhog Day for free. A new tradition that Woodstock has added is the annual groundhog lighting on Groundhog Day.
• HarvestFest
• McHenry County Fair
• Summer band concerts
• Woodstock Challenge
• Woodstock CABA Days
• Woodstock Folk Festival

Movies

The award winning film "Groundhog Day" was filmed in Woodstock. One of the stores from the Woodstock Square was used to film a scene from the movie. Signs from other stores are also visible throughout the movie.

A scene in "Planes, Trains, and Automobiles" was also filmed in Woodstock: the scene in which the car is towed in front of a building (the Old Courthouse) and Steve Martin enters the truck driven by John Candy.

In addition, Woodstock can claim an important role in a creative outpouring of Orson Welles. Welles attended the Todd School for Boys in Woodstock. At Todd, Welles came under the positive influence and guidance of Roger Hill, a teacher who later became Todd's headmaster. Hill provided Welles with an ad hoc educational environment that proved invaluable to his creative experience, allowing Welles to concentrate on subjects that interested him. Welles performed and staged his first theatrical experiments and productions there.

Music

Woodstock has become an important destination for live music in McHenry County and the region. A wealth of talented folk, jazz, blues and rock musicians can be heard throughout the week.

In addition to the Woodstock Opera House, several venues in the city showcase local musical talent:
• DC Cobb's
• Gus's Roadhouse
• La Petite Crêperie & Bistrot
• Liquid Blues
• Pirro's Restaurante
• Stage Left Café

A number of organizations support and promote live music in Woodstock:
• Jazz on the Square [1]
• Masthouse
• Off Square Music
• Opera Woodstock
• Woodstock Folk Festival





Sources:

http://chicago.urban-history.org/ven/hls/sherman.shtml

The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago, Chicago Historical Society

VintagePostcards.org

http://www.geocities.com/hydey6/dillingerphotos.html

Wikipedia


Last edited by Liz on Mon Feb 04, 2008 8:15 pm, edited 2 times in total.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 6:36 pm 
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WOW Liz -- A++++++++++++++ for your Chicago report !!

In the photo of Aurora, there is a very tall, red brick building in the background. The Paramount theater (where they were scouting last week) is just opposite that building. Here is a picture from a different angle.

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While I've lived in Chicago my entire life, I've only lived in Aurora for 7 years. I actually discovered information about the town in your post that I didn't know... and I live here. !!! :blush:

Excellent tidbit.... WELL DONE !!!! :cool:



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Super tidbit as always, Liz. :thanks!:

Lucky13 - what a gorgeous theatre the Paramount is. Is the inside as amazing as the outside? Thanks for posting this picture
:cool:



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Liz, I hope the location scouts are reading your tidbits. They should hire you! Most excellent! There are so many of those small towns that don't look like they have changed too much and would be perfect for the movie. It's so good to see that so many of the old buildings, like the Paramount, have retained their character.

Lucky13, good luck to you if filming comest to town!
:cool:



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rainbowsoul wrote:
Lucky13 - what a gorgeous theatre the Paramount is. Is the inside as amazing as the outside? Thanks for posting this picture :cool:


It is, rainbowsoul !!!

Click the link for some "interior photos".

http://www.paramountarts.com/aboutphotos.php

Thank you for you good wishes, DITHOT ! :hug:



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Lucky13 wrote:
WOW Liz -- A++++++++++++++ for your Chicago report !!

In the photo of Aurora, there is a very tall, red brick building in the background. The Paramount theater (where they were scouting last week) is just opposite that building. Here is a picture from a different angle.

While I've lived in Chicago my entire life, I've only lived in Aurora for 7 years. I actually discovered information about the town in your post that I didn't know... and I live here. !!! :blush:

Excellent tidbit.... WELL DONE !!!! :cool:


Wow, thanks, Lucky 13. I was nervous that I'd not give your neck of the woods its due. I did forget to add a couple of places on the map, though--St. Joseph's Cemetery (where Baby Face Nelson is buried) and Washington Ave. (the dentist's office). But I'll be switching maps within the next half hour.

So were they scouting at the Paramount or at the tall red building? I'm confused. That Paramount is beautiful, BTW.



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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 8:10 pm 
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Oops, sorry for the confusion Liz. The Paramount Theater is where they were scouting, but I wouldn't be surprised if that entire area wouldn't be considered.

Here is another photo just a block away.

Image



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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 8:18 pm 
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What a cute town! I just love how these midwestern cities/towns/villages can keep their small town feel--and that they are preserved so well. :cool:



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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 8:25 pm 
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It's really strange to drive into that area of the town.. it's like going through a "time warp". If that location is chosen, I'll DEFINITELY get some photos to share. It's currently buried in snow, we got 15 inches since Thursday.



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PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 1:39 pm 
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Great tidbit Liz.
I am catching up..following super Tuesday is distracting me from ONBC. I am surprised just how many little spots you have found that are standing still in time as DITHOT put it on another thread. I live in an area that's relatively new and it's easy to forget some of these little photogenic places are still around. I hope the film scouts find some of these great places and keep the film as accurate as possible.
Another thought, Do I notice a real tendency for these fellows to find places to live close to water? Some are tourist spots but even city living seems to be close to lakes.



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PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 10:23 pm 
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gemini, I'm a bit distracted by the politics of the day as well. I hadn't noticed the water connection. I don't know if it is coincidence or not?



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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 1:24 am 
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Thanks so much Liz for this great account of Chicago and its suburbs. I can only say I know the Chicago O'hara Airport well. I absolutely love that Paramount Theater in Aurora. Oh how I hope they film in there.! And thank you Lucky 13 for those cool pictures inside. Like the Kodak in Hollywood, I love old theaters. . .I grew up in them in southern California.

And the facts to my amazement was in Chicago they put their sewage into the lake they used for water! Ziks! What do you suppose they do now??

DITHOT and Liz, when does the book discussion start? I'm only half way through.

Lady Jill
P. S. The events of this day actually brought me to the Zone to catch up on the tidbits and feel more at peace!



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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 1:36 am 
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Lady Jill wrote:
Thanks so much Liz for this great account of Chicago and its suburbs. I can only say I know the Chicago O'hara Airport well. I absolutely love that Paramount Theater in Aurora. Oh how I hope they film in there.! And thank you Lucky 13 for those cool pictures inside. Like the Kodak in Hollywood, I love old theaters. . .I grew up in them in southern California.

And the facts to my amazement was in Chicago they put their sewage into the lake they used for water! Ziks! What do you suppose they do now??

DITHOT and Liz, when does the book discussion start? I'm only half way through.

Lady Jill
P. S. The events of this day actually brought me to the Zone to catch up on the tidbits and feel more at peace!


I assume you are talking about the deadly tornados? Seems so weird to have just posted a tidbit touching on Hurricane Katrina and then see news of more disaster. I hope no Zoners have been affected. :-/ Or were you just talking about Super Tuesday? :lol:

In answer to your question, the discussion will start on Monday. We will be posting an announcement tomorrow.



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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 2:07 am 
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Ziks, no I hadn't heard of tornadoes! My comment was on Super Tuesday. . .I was for the other guy. . .
And yes, the suffering of Hurricane Kathrine is still going on.
Lady Jill



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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 10:21 am 
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Lady Jill wrote:
And thank you Lucky 13 for those cool pictures inside. Like the Kodak in Hollywood, I love old theaters. . .I grew up in them in southern California.


You're most welcome, Lady Jill. I got to see the Kodak Theater when I was in California for the AWE Premiere --- absolutely beautiful !!!

As for that sewage in the Lake, :yuck2: , I can assure you there are modern day sanitation systems to purify the water. Can you imagine the health hazard that could have been ?? :yuck:



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