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 Post subject: PE Tidbit #19 - Indiana, MI & OH - New Pics Added
PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 2:23 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 2:13 pm
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Location: The Left Coast
INDIANA

The following map indicates the following cities and towns via the red dots.



INDIANAPOLIS

John Dillinger was born in Indianapolis, IN. His half-brother, Hubert, worked at a filling station there.

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About Indy: What's a Hoosier?

That's the question most asked by Indiana visitors. No one seems to know exactly where the word "Hoosier" (hoo-zhur) came from but there are plenty of stories on its origin -- 30 at last count. Here are some of the more popular theories:

• Hoosiers are well-known for their questioning and it is possible the nickname originated because they could not pass a house without pulling the latchstring and crying out "Who's yere (here)?"
• In 1851 Amelia M. Murray reported that she heard the name Hoosier originate when settlers shouted "Huzza!" when gaining victory over a marauding party from a neighboring state.
• Kentucky contractor Samuel Hoosier hired Indiana workers to build the Portland canal at Louisville. These superior laborers became known as "Hoosier's Men" or "Hoosiers" and carried the nickname back north with them. Unfortunately, no one has ever been able to prove the existence of Mr. Hoosier.
• Before its use in America, Hoosier was used in England to refer to someone who lived in the hills or mountains. It may be related to the French"osier" meaning someone from the countryside. This term is still commonly used in Eastern Canada.
• Indiana poet James Whitcomb Riley said the origin of the title "Hoosier" came from the pugnacious habits of the early settlers. "They were vicious fighters ... [and] frequently bit off noses and ears. This happened so often that a settler coming into the barroom after a fight would see an ear on the floor and ask,'Whose ear?'"
• That Indiana rivermen were so spectacularly successful in trouncing or "hushing" their adversaries in the brawling that was then common that they became known as "hushers," and eventually Hoosiers.
• A theory attributed to Gov. Joseph Wright derived Hoosier from an Indian word for corn, "hoosa." Indiana flatboatmen taking corn or maize to New Orleans came to be known as "hoosa men" or Hoosiers. Unfortunately, a careful search of Indian vocabularies failed to reveal any such word for corn.

Today the word is used to denote an Indiana native or resident. Although the origin is uncertain, one thing is clear about the word -- "Hoosier" and Hospitality go hand in hand.

Seriously, Indianapolis is the capital city of the state of Indiana, and the county seat of Marion County, Indiana. The 2000 Census counted the city's population (excluding included towns) at 781,870. It is Indiana's most populous city and is the 13th largest city in the U.S., the third largest city in the Midwest, and the second most populous Capital in the U.S., behind Phoenix, Arizona.

Although Indianapolis sits in the Rust Belt, like many larger Rust Belt cities it has diversified its economic base to not rely solely on manufacturing. A large part of this diversification also involves the hosting of events, especially sporting events. The labels of The Amateur Sports Capital of the World, and The Racing Capital of the World, have both been applied to Indianapolis. The city has hosted the 1987 Pan American Games, both Men's and Women's NCAA Basketball Tournaments, the Allstate 400 at the Brickyard, the United States Grand Prix (2000-2007), and is perhaps most famous for the annual Indianapolis 500. The attendance at both the Indianapolis 500 and the Allstate 400 makes them the largest two single day sporting events in the world, with well over 250,000 fans in attendance at each. Indianapolis has the second most monuments inside city limits, behind only Washington D.C. There have also been two United States Navy vessels named after Indianapolis, including the famous USS Indianapolis (CA-35) which suffered the worst single at-sea loss of life in the history of the U.S. Navy.

The Indianapolis metropolitan area has seen modest and steady growth among U.S. cities, with growth centered in the surrounding counties of Hamilton, Hendricks, and Johnson. Hamilton and Hendricks Counties are currently the fastest growing counties in Indiana, although the state as a whole is only showing modest growth. Currently, the Combined Statistical Area stands at 1,984,644, making it the 23rd largest in the U.S.

Home to Butler University and Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI).

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Home of Audrey Hancock, Dillinger's sister, where funeral was held July 1934
Maywood, IN (a section of Indianappolis)

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Dillinger’s Gravesite at Crown Hill Cemetery


MOORESVILLE
(home of the Dillinger farm)

Mooresville is a town in Morgan County, Indiana, in the United States. As of the 2000 census, the town population was 9,273. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 5.6 square miles.

John Dillinger’s Father’s Farm:


http://travel.webshots.com/photo/2001309310051634853tlUqSe?vhost=travel

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Trivia

• Mooresville was founded in 1824 by Samuel Moore, a Quaker from North Carolina.
• Mooresville is the birth place of the artist Paul Hadley, who was the designer of the Indiana State Flag.
• Gravity Hill is a locally famous land mark located near the intersection of State Road 42 and Keller Hill Road. Because of an optical illusion, cars parked at the bottom of the road appear quite convincingly to roll uphill. This has been featured in many regional television and newspaper reports.
• John Dillinger spent most of his childhood in Mooresville and sometimes absconded to the small town while hiding from authorities.
• Sammy L. Davis, Medal of Honor recipient, and attended Mooresville High School. Sammy Davis provided the body for Tom Hanks receiving his Medal of Honor in Forrest Gump.
• Mooresville recently provided the background for a video short, "Big Dancing, Small Town", produced by and starring two Mooresville High School seniors. The video's popularity with visitors to the website YouTube culminated in its presentation as a feature video on the ABC television show Good Morning America, on January 24, 2007.
• Arnold Zifel, the pig from Green Acres was from Jim Clem's Farm in Mooresville, Indiana. The pig was a pedigree Chester White, trained by Frank Inn.

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The body of John Dillinger is brought to a Mooresville funeral home.
Thousands tried to get a glimpse of him during his funeral.


Johnny Depp, Michael Mann and John Dillinger’s nephew, Jeff Scalf, at Mooresville, 3/08:

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Pg. 138-139: In late 1924 Dillinger arrived at Indiana’s Pendleton Reformatory a bitter young man. In his first weeks at Pendleton, Dillinger tried twice to escape……His friendships with Pierpont and Van Meter hardened Dillinger. When the two were transferred to the state prison at Michigan City, Dillinger asked to be transferred, too. On July 15, 1929, he got his wish.


PENDLETON

Pendleton is a town in Madison County, Indiana, United States. It is part of the Anderson, Indiana Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 3,873 at the 2000 census.

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Pendleton Reformatory then

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Pendleton Correctional Facility now

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Michigan City State Prison then

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Michigan City State Prison now


MICHIGAN CITY


Pg. 98: The house Alvin Karpis rented for the summer lay on a secluded thread of dirt road that snaked along the southern short of Lake Michigan east of Michigan City, Indiana.

Michigan City is a city in LaPorte County, Indiana. It is one of two principal cities of and is included in the Michigan City-La Porte, Indiana Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Chicago-Naperville-Michigan City Combined Statistical Area.It is also part of an area known to locals as Michiana. It is approximately 50 miles east of Chicago and 40 miles west of South Bend. The population was 32,900 at the 2000 census.

Michigan City is noted for both its proximity to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore and for its bordering Lake Michigan; because of this, Michigan City receives a fair amount of tourism during the summer months, especially by residents of Chicago and parts of Indiana.

On clear days it is possible to see the Chicago skyline across Lake Michigan. In 1996 Democratic Mayor Sheila Brillson introduced a new logo for Michigan City, which featured the Chicago Skyline. Many residents rebelled at this proposal, so the official logo was changed.

Michigan City is the home of the Old Michigan City Light, one of Indiana's few lighthouses. Michigan City's largest shopping center, Lighthouse Place Outlet Mall, which was built in the mid 1980s, pays homage to the lighthouse. Marquette Mall, constructed in 1965, is Michigan City's sole conventional shopping mall. St. Anthony Memorial Health Center is Michigan City's sole hospital.

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The eastern edge of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore is also located in Michigan City. Features include Mount Baldy, a large wandering dune. A larger dune, Hoosier Slide, sat at the site of the current electrical generating station. This dune was mined for its sand in the late 19th century. The sand found on the beaches in and near Michigan City is nicknamed "singing sand" because of the sound it produces.

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Mount Baldy



Pg. 64: Dillinger drove to Muncie on Friday, July 14, and found Shaw and a group of friends lying around an apartment on South Council Street…..That afternoon they took Copeland and drove ten miles west to the farm town of Dalesville, whose bank Dillinger had scouted; they agreed to rob it on Monday…..For some reason, probably because they were low on cash, they decided to rob a Muncie roadhouse, the Bide-a-Wee Tavern, the same night.


DALEVILLE

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Daleville, Indiana from the northeast.

Daleville is a town in Salem Township, Delaware County, Indiana. The population was 1,658 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Muncie, IN Metropolitan Statistical Area. Note that the official way to spell it is without the “s”.

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The Bank Then

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The Bank Today



MUNCIE

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A typical Muncie house

Muncie is a city in Delaware County in east central Indiana, best known as the home of Ball State University and the birthplace of the Ball Corporation. It is the principal city of the Muncie, Indiana Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of 118,769.

Muncie was dubbed Middletown after a team of sociologists, led by Robert Lynd and Helen Lynd, initiated a series of sociological studies in Muncie funded by the Rockefeller Institute of Social and Religious Research. "The aim... was to study synchronously the interwoven trends that are the life of a small American city." (Lynd and Lynd 1929: 3) Muncie was considered a typical Middle-American community. In 1929, the Lynds published their first study in a book entitled Middletown: A Study in Modern American Culture. The Lynds returned to Muncie to re-observe the community during the Depression. In 1937 they published Middletown in Transition: A Study in Cultural Conflicts. The National Science Foundation then funded a third study resulting in two books by Theodore Caplow, Middletown Families (1982) and All Faithful People (1983). Caplow returned in 1998 to begin another study known as Middletown IV, which became part of a PBS Documentary entitled "The First Measured Century," released in December, 2000. These are only a few of the most notable studies. The Ball State Center for Middletown Studies continues to survey and analyze the social changes occurring in Muncie. An enormous database of Middletown surveys, conducted from 1978 to 1997, is available online from ARDA, American Religion Data Archive. Ironically, a Henry County farming community with the authentic name of Middletown, IN, is only a 20-minute drive from Muncie, though it has no relationship to the Middletown Studies.

Harry Pierpont, member of the Dillinger gang was born here in 1902.


GREENCASTLE


Pg. 143: Only then did Pierpont and Dillinger feel strong enough to take a bank. They decided on the Central National Bank in Greencastle, Indiana, west of Indianapolis, the home of DePauw University. (According to Wikipedia, the take was the gang’s largest--$74,000)

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Greencastle, Indiana, Central National Bank, 1933

Greencastle is a city in Greencastle Township, Putnam County, Indiana. The population was 9,880 at the 2000 census.

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DePauw University



EAST CHICAGO

Pg.186-188:

East Chicago
Monday, January 15

Whatever the case, that day Dillinger performed like a hungry actor on a brightly lit stage. The bank he selected was in East Chicago, the corrupt mill town where he had spent time the previous summer……Dillinger appeared stunned. For the first time in his career, he appeared to lose his temper…..He raised his submachine gun and fired a burst directly into Detective O’Malley…..Eyewitnesses made the identification, and the evening newspapers made it official: John Dillinger, the man who many in Indiana cheered for fighting greedy bankers, was now a murderer. For the rest of his life the killing clearly weighed on Dillinger’s mind. He would repeatedly deny shooting Detective O’Malley, to lawyers, lawmen, and friends.


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First National Bank, East Chicago, then

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First National Bank today

East Chicago is a city in Lake County, Indiana, opposite Chicago, Illinois. The population was 32,414 at the 2000 census.

East Chicago became a leading industrial center by capitalizing on the resources of its metropolitan namesake and its proximity to Lake Michigan and the Calumet River. Mills and factory jobs drew tens of thousands of migrants to the region in the 1910s and 1920s. The town grew to the fringes of Whiting, Hammond, and Gary, eventually covering more than 12 square miles.

The Potawatomi hunted East Chicago's white pine and oak forests and fished its grassy rive rways. In 1854, George W. Clark, a farsighted civil engineer connected with railroads, began accumulating land along Lake Michigan. In 1881 a British investment firm bought a parcel of Clark's land, and platting of the subdivision of East Chicago began in 1888. That same year, the Chicago & Calumet Terminal Beltline (later the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad) linked the settlement to Chicago's trunk rail system. East Chicago incorporated as a town in 1889, and reincorporated as a city in 1893.

After 1901 two events transformed the city's fortunes. First, Inland Steel built a plant at Indiana Harbor, heralding the dawn of East Chicago as an industrial center. Second, in 1903 the East Chicago Company (ECC) took direct control of residential and municipal planning.

The ECC represented Chicago powerbrokers, including Potter Palmer, Jr., and Stanley McCormick. They recognized the need for a new industrial zone outside Chicago and invested heavily in municipal services, oversaw neighborhood planning, and dredged the Indiana Harbor Ship Canal. By 1907, East Chicago boasted a navigable waterway link to Lake Michigan and to the Grand Calumet River.
Enormous freighters, thousands of railcars, and massive pipelines eventually supplied coal, iron ore, limestone, oil, and other materials from around the nation for processing. Steel mills, petroleum refineries, construction, manufacturing, and chemical factories operated at Indiana Harbor and along its inner canal system.

With immigrants from Eastern and Southern Europe flocking to its factory jobs, the population of East Chicago soared 460 percent between 1900 and 1910, from 3,411 to 19,098. Over 50 percent of the population were not native born. During World War I, African Americans from the South, and Mexicans from the Southwest and Mexico, joined the industrial labor force, lifting the population to 54,784 by 1930.

A rivalry developed between Indiana Harbor, the “East Side” home of Inland Steel and most working-class families, and East Chicago's “West Side,” the residential enclave of the native-born business community. Locals spoke of the “Twin City” to describe spatial, residential, and class divisions at the heart of the town's identity.

In the 1920s, East Chicago carried a reputation as a freewheeling boomtown with a vibrant vice district and underground network of “blind tigers” serving bootleg liquor. In 1930, federal investigators indicted East Chicago mayor Raleigh Hale and police chief James W. Regan for conspiring to violate Prohibition, forcing both men to resign.
Religious practices fostered early community development through ethnic social services and the building of St. Catherine Hospital. By World War II, 59 congregations reflecting the ethnic and cultural diversity of the population.

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CROWN POINT


Pg. 234-242: Dillinger was brought back to Indiana from Tucson to face charges for the murder of Officer O’Malley in East Chicago, IN. He went to Crown Point because it was the county seat of Lake County. There he was chummy with the prosecutor and escaped from the jail, supposedly using the wooden gun to do it, and escaped in the sheriff’s Ford V-8.

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The Jail in 1934

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Posing for the Press with Sheriff Holley on the left

(LIZ NOTE: This is the mystery woman from DITHOT's newsreel)

And here is Lili Taylor (playing Sheriff Holley) in front of the jailhouse, March 2008:

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And going in to the house:


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Fast Facts

• Crown Point Population (2005 estimate): 22‚697
• Lake County Population: 493‚297
• Crown Point is in northwestern Indiana‚ 45 miles southeast of Chicago and 145 miles north of Indianapolis.
• Crown Point was founded in 1834 when Solon Robinson and his family staked claim to a tract of prairie land‚ becoming the area’s first settlers. The community was incorporated in 1868.
• Lake County is growing at a rate of about 2,500 new residents each year.
• On a clear day, you can see the Chicago skyline from the top of the old Lake County Courthouse, which was constructed in 1878.
• The scenic Lake County Fairgrounds has hosted the Lake County Fair since 1852.
• Noted gangster John Dillinger escaped from the Lake County Sheriff’s House and Jail on March 3, 1934, and the town likes to play down that fact.
• The largest corn roast this side of Nebraska takes place every year at the Crown Point Hometown Festival Days.
• Fair Oaks Farm is a working dairy farm where you can see cheese and ice cream made right before your eyes.
• Lake County is graced with five landmarks listed on the National Register of Historic Places: The Courthouse Square Historic District, the Lake County Courthouse, the Wellington A. Clark House (Old Homestead), the Sheriff’s House and Jail, and the William Whitaker site.
• Crown Point is known as the Hub City for its well-placed location, less than an hour from Chicago. It is the county seat for rural farmlands as well as the urban areas of Hammond, East Chicago and Gary.
• The city is known for staging America’s first major auto race, even before the Indianapolis 500 debuted in 1911. The Cobe Cup occurred June 19, 1909, along a 27-mile track through Crown Point.
• Because Crown Point had no waiting period for marriage licenses, the city became a popular place to get married and became known as the Marriage Mill. Many famous people came to Crown Point to be wed including Tom Mix, Rudolph Valentino, Cassius Clay, Jackson 5 patriarch Joseph Jackson and Ronald Reagan.

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The Sheriff’s House (built in 1882) is currently being refurbished through efforts of the Sheriff’s House Foundation. The front portion of the building was home to sheriffs for 76 continual years. The back portion of the building was the Lake County Jail, the place where John Dillinger made his fantastic escape in 1934.


And in March 2008 during filming:

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These are original 1930's gates kept under lock and key.

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The supposed site where there once was a walkway from building to building that Dillinger once walked to access the Court Room.

Between buildings in March 2008 during filming:

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The back wall visible from entering the Court Room. The first thing you see when entering.

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This chandalier is a supposed original from the 1930's, inside the Court Room itself.

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The old Lake County Court House is prominently situated in the center of Crown Point, which is commonly referred to simply as the square. The first portion of the court house were erected in 1878, with portions being added on all the way up to 1928. Inside the "Grand Old Lady", there are gift shops, a restaurant, and a museum which is located on the second floor.


LIZ NOTE: I have it on good authority (from one of the town librarians) that this is not the courthouse in which Dillinger was tried. That would be the one next to the jail in this picture—The Lake County Criminal Court Building:

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The Old Courthouse during filming, with reporter extras lined up in front:

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During Filming….

Johnny Depp’s Escape :lol: :

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v223/Liz-ONBC/Public%20Enemies/Indiana/CP%20Filming/CP-Escape.jpg

Making a Run For It:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v223/Liz-ONBC/Public%20Enemies/Indiana/CP%20Filming/CP-MakingaBreakForIt.jpg

The Getaway Car:


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The Lillian Holley House (not as sheriff)
205 E. South St.
This fanciful Queen Anne house more than any other in Crown Point has fascinated local residents young and old. This house was built c: 1890 for Flora Norton Biggs the widow of James H. Biggs of Cincinnati. Biggs had been engaged in real estate and was a dealer for the United States Cotton Press and Hay Press. Flora was the daughter of Aaron Hart and Martha Reed Dyer who were the largest land owners in Lake County before the turn-of-the-20th-century. Flora's mother had built the neighboring home at 105 E. South Street for Malcolm and Maquerit Hart, her brother and sister-in-law. Perhaps the longest and best known resident of this house was the late Lillian Holley who died at the age of 102 in 1994. Mrs. Holley was a patron of the Old Lake County Courthouse, and the large clocks in the central tower were restored to working order because of her generosity during the nation's bicentennial.



HAMMOND, Indiana – From RoadsideAmerica.com:

Dillinger relative forces close of Dillinger Museum

The Dillinger Museum, Hammond, Indiana, will shut down as a result of litigation filed by Jeffrey Scalf, great-nephew of notorious alleged crime figure John Dillinger. Sued under Indiana's Right to Personality Law, the museum's board couldn't reach a settlement with Scalf. Scalf has gone after other Dillinger-exploiting businesses and walked away with undisclosed settlements.

According to reports in local papers, his crusade began when another relative became upset over the continuing public perception that Dillinger killed people. Interestingly, Scalf has expressed interest in opening up his own Dillinger Museum -- perhaps to profile the positive side of the man?

The museum has operated quietly in an Indiana Welcome Center on Interstate 80/94 for four years. Before that, the museum was the collection of Joe Pinkston, who operated it in Nashville, Indiana before his suicide in 1998. The collection still includes dozens of wax gangster figures, Dillinger's Trousers of Death, the wooden jail escape gun, and the popular morgue diorama. It was always a cheery stop on cross-country hypertours....

With the likelihood of an auction or dispersion of the collection looming, a local author, Tony Stewart, has offered to take the collection and exhibit it for free. Stewart, author of the book "Hidden Truth," is the great-nephew of Dillinger's wife, and claims he knew Joe Pinkston.
The museum closing date has not been set. [11/05/2003]



SOUTH BEND

Pg. 384:

South Bend, Indiana
Saturday, June 30

It was a hot, bright summer morning when the gang’s car pulled up just past the intersection of Wayne and Michigan Streets in the heart of downtown South Bend at 11:30 a.m……Slaby watched, stunned, as Dillinger and two of the others disappeared around the corner, toward the Merchants Bank.


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Merchants National Bank, 1934

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229 South Michigan Ave. Cambodian Egg Roll Restaurant now occupies the building where the Merchants National Bank once called home. Remodeling over the years have changed the front of the building. It doesn't even look like there was once a bank in there at all.

South Bend is a city in St. Joseph County, Indiana. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total of 107,789 residents; its metropolitan area had a population of 316,663. It is the fourth largest city in Indiana and county seat of St. Joseph County. It is the economic and cultural hub of Michiana, and is best known as the home of the University of Notre Dame.

South Bend lies along the Indiana Toll Road at the south most turn in the St. Joseph River, from which it derives its name. The area was originally settled in the early 19th century by fur traders, and established as a city in 1865. The St. Joseph River shaped South Bend's economy through the mid 20th century. River access led to heavy industrial development that peaked with Studebaker being based in the city, along with Oliver Chilled Plow Company and several other industrial companies.

The population of South Bend has steadily declined since its peak at around 133,000 in the 1960s. This is in large part due to the demise of Studebaker and other heavy industry. Today, the largest industries in South Bend are health care, education, and small businesses. A large tourism sector also exists, mainly supported by the University of Notre Dame. Despite the decrease in population, South Bend still remains the focal point for Michiana, with the second busiest airport in Indiana, interurban rail service to downtown Chicago, and several large businesses including Crowe Chizek and AM General.

The South Bend area is home to several institutions of higher learning; the most famous of which is the University of Notre Dame. The university is located to the north of South Bend in Notre Dame, Indiana. The University of Notre Dame was founded by Father Edward Sorin, a French priest, in 1842 before South Bend was incorporated as a city in 1865, and has been an intrinsic part of the South Bend area with great effect on its culture and economy.

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Notre Dame

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Wayne and Michigan Streets, 2002. Looking north. Merchants National Bank was in the third building north on the east side. (Where the minivan is parked) Officer Wagner would have been standing close to the manhole cover when he was gunned down.


WARSAW


Pg. 293: At 1:15 that Friday morning, a fifty-four-year-old police officer named Judd Pittenger was standing on a corner in downtown Warsaw, Indiana…Warsaw was a sleepy town, and Pittenger…walked a sleepy beat….”We want your vests”, Dillinger said, “and we mean business….With a sigh, Pittenger reached into his pocket and handed over the key…..Dillinger took out three bulletproof vests and two pistols.

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Warsaw police station robbed 1934

Warsaw is a city in Indiana and the county seat of, Kosciusko County, Indiana. The population was 12,415, as of the 2000 census. The Warsaw area is among the fastest growing cities in Indiana. The approximate population of the city in the 2010 census is 39,000.

Cradled between Winona Lake, Pike Lake and Center Lake, Warsaw is nicknamed "Lake City," though other cities in the surrounding area are also referred to by that nickname.




MICHIGAN

GRAND HAVEN


Pg. 107: Bentz was standing in a grove of trees outside of Grand Haven, Michigan, a resort town on Lake Michigan. Standing beside him was his new protégé, the former Lester Gillis. This was the day Baby Face Nelson would stage his first real bank robbery.

Nickname: Coast Guard City U.S.A.

Lake Michigan Cam.
Brrrrrr.

http://www.lakemichigancam.com/

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Grand Haven, in the state of Michigan and is the county seat of Ottawa County. The city is located on Lake Michigan at the mouth of the Grand River, for which it is named. As of the 2000 census, Grand Haven population was 11,168 and is located within the 39th largest media market in the country out of 210.

In the mid to late 1800s, Grand Haven developed into a logging, lumber mill and shipping area. During the early 1900s Grand Haven was as a manufacturing hub for the area building everything from automobiles and auto parts to furniture, lighting and pianos.

The former Grand Trunk Railway on the waterfront near the river is now a historical museum. The Story and Clark Piano Company built pianos in the city from 1900-1984. The smokestack at the piano factory collapsed during the Southern Great Lakes Derecho of 1998 (in layman’s terms a major thunderstorm and tornado).

The Grand Haven Lighthouses were first built in 1839 on the south pier marking the channel into the river. The current lighthouses, painted red, were built in 1875 (outer light) and 1905 (inner). They are connected by a lighted catwalk which runs along the pier to the shore.

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Business and Tourism

Grand Haven is now an active and eclectic resort, boating, fishing and port community, while maintaining its small town feel. The city boasts over 100 miles of bike trails, a state beach, boardwalk, 2 lighthouses, a pier, wharf, a large charter fishing fleet and a Great Lakes port, where it imports limestone, slag, cement & coal while exporting sand.

Grand Haven State Park was nationally recognized for having one of the top 5 beaches in the United States by Good Morning America - Travel Mom. In summer, waters reach a glorious low 70s and it brings tens of thousands of visitors to the golden sands, along with a boon of activity to the local economy.

West Michigan has been called the Midwest Mecca of beach volleyball due to the quality of sands. Grand Haven State Beach is a key destination for volleyball enthusiasts and hosts the AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tournament throughout the summer months.

The state park also includes a campground on Lake Michigan, near the pier and lighthouses. In addition, the city features a ski park (Mulligan's Hollow Ski Bowl) and a skate park. The calm waters of Lake Michigan bring tourists from all over the state and region for boating, sailing, jet skiing and wind surfing.

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Grand Haven 2 days ago

Grand Haven is also home to one of the country's most beautiful golf courses. The Grand Haven Golf Club was designed in 1965 by the legendary pioneer of Michigan golf, architect Bruce Matthews Sr. It has been featured in Sports Illustrated, Golf Digest magazines and on USA Network's "PGA Tour Sunday." It also gained national attention as home to the LPGA's Shoreline Classic until recently.

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Grand Haven is home to the United States Coast Guard's "Group Grand Haven," which coordinates all Lake Michigan Coast Guard activities. The first Coast Guard presence in the city was in 1932. The city hosts the annual Coast Guard Festival, which draws U.S. and Canadian vessels along with parades of bands and other activities. The yearly attendance for this event exceeds 100,000 people over the two-week period of the festival. Grand Haven is also officially designated as "Coast Guard City, USA" by an act of Congress signed by President Bill Clinton. The act was Public Law 105-383 enacted by the United States Congress and signed by the president on November 13, 1998. The Grand Haven Musical Fountain was built on the opposite bank of the Grand River from the city center in 1962. It plays nightly in tourist season. When it was built, it was the world's largest such fountain. It purportedly is still the largest fountain with colored lights although the largest fountain overall is now in Las Vegas.

Technology

Grand Haven has been a technology leader in West Michigan and throughout the country having been featured in the national media, including on ABC, in PCWorld, ComputerWorld and Forbes magazine. The city holds the title as first municipality in the country to feature a city-wide wireless internet service. The wireless service is designed to work throughout the city and up to 15 miles offshore for boaters. In 2004, the city started offering wireless internet service every day to residents, businesses and visitors.
(our kind of place!)



OHIO

Ohio Map:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v223/Liz-ONBC/Public%20Enemies/Indiana/ohio-mapcopy.jpg


FOSTORIA


Pg. 338-339:

Fostoria, Ohio
Thursday, May 3

Sipping coffee from a pair of Thermos jugs, Dillinger, Van Meter, and Tommy Carroll drove east to Toledo, where they stole another car. They were almost out of money. Van Meter said he knew a bank.

People in Fostoria, a rail hub forty miles south of Toledo, considered the town’s banks robbery-proof; so many slow-moving trains crisscrossed the area that police believed they would dissuade any robbers from putting together a getaway map.



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Fostoria is a city in Hancock, Seneca, and Wood Counties in the northwestern part of the state of Ohio. It is approximately 40 miles south of Toledo (Glass City) and 90 miles north of Columbus. The population was 13,931 at the 2000 census. The city is named for Charles Foster, the 35th Governor of Ohio and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Benjamin Harrison. Fostoria is known for its glass heritage and railroading: two CSX main lines and one NS main line intersect in downtown Fostoria, an area called the "Iron Triangle" by railfans. As featured in the October 2001 issue of Trains magazine, Fostoria, Ohio is one of the nation's busiest train junctions with over 100 trains every day. One of the best viewing spots is adjacent to the former Amtrak station, located at 500 S. Main St.

Fostoria Glass

From 1887 through 1920 Fostoria was the heart of the glass industry in the United States boasting 13 glass factories within the city limits. These thriving businesses were provided resources through two local excavation companies which harvested the rich lime quarries in the area.

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CSX AC4400CW 37 rolls past Fostoria, Ohio's F Tower on the point of southward grain train G061 on February 18, 2001. With two railroads, three main lines, diamonds, and an active tower, Fostoria provides countless opportunities and angles for train watchers.


TOLEDO

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Toledo is a city in the state of Ohio and the county seat of Lucas County. The municipality is located in northwestern Ohio on the western end of Lake Erie and south of the Michigan border. It is the principal city in the Toledo Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of July 1, 2006, the U.S. Census Bureau listed the city with a population of 298,446. According to the US Census, the metropolitan area had a population of 653,695, while the Combined Statistical Area had a population of 715,320. Residents of Toledo are usually referred to as Toledoans. Toledo is known as the Glass City because of its long history of innovation in all aspects of the glass industry: windows, bottles, windshields, construction materials, and glass art, of which the Toledo Museum of Art has a large collection. Several large glass companies have their origins here. Owens-Illinois, Owens Corning, Libbey Glass, Pilkington North America (formerly Libbey Owens Ford), and Therma-Tru have long been a staple of Toledo's economy. Other off-shoots and spinoffs of these companies also continue to play important roles in Toledo's economy. Fiberglass giant Johns Manville's two plants in the metro area were originally built by a subsidiary of Libbey Owens Ford. Many other companies that service the glass industry also began in Toledo, such as Toledo Engineering and Glasstech.

Toledo had also been known as "The Auto Parts Capital of the World". Several large, Fortune 500 automotive related companies had their headquarters in Toledo. Electric AutoLite, Sheller-Globe Corporation, Champion Spark Plug, Questor, and Dana Corporation are examples of large auto parts companies that began in Toledo. Only Dana Corporation is still in existence as an independent entity. The Jeep vehicle has been manufactured in Toledo since 1941 as well. Willys-Overland was a major automaker headquartered in Toledo until 1953.

Climate

Toledo, like many other cities in the Great Lakes region, experiences a continental climate, characterized by four distinct seasons, with significant variations in temperature and precipitation between them. The city's location just off the western end of Lake Erie moderates its climate somewhat, so that it is less extreme than if the city were further from the lake. The city also shares many climatic characteristics with the Ohio Valley, such as slightly warmer winters and increased precipitation that is more evenly spread throughout the year.



Pg. 429-432:

Cleveland, Ohio
September 3

Alvin Karpis lay on the warm roof of his Ford….Above them, the Cleveland Air Show was nearing its climax…..Karpis’s concerns coincided with a job offer from a pair of new friends, a squat mobster named Shimmy Patton and his partner, a think blond named Art Heberbrand. The two were opening a swank new casino called the Harvard Club in the Cleveland suburb of Newberg Heights and , worried about threats from a rival syndicate, they asked Karpis if he would handle security…..Despite all his efforts, the others stuck to him like tar. Restless in Toledo, they followed him to Cleveland one by one. Freddie and Paula Harmon took a bungalow on West 171st Street….


NEWBURGH HEIGHTS

Newburgh Heights is a village and suburb of Cleveland in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. The population was 2,389 at the 2000 census.
(note the difference in the spelling)

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A House in Newburgh today


CLEVELAND

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Cleveland is a city in the state of Ohio and the county seat of Cuyahoga County, the most populous county in the state. The municipality is located in northeastern Ohio on the southern shore of Lake Erie, approximately 60 miles west of the Pennsylvania border. It was founded in 1796 near the mouth of the Cuyahoga River, and became a manufacturing center owing to its location at the head of numerous canals and railroad lines. With the decline of heavy manufacturing, Cleveland's businesses have diversified into the service economy, including the financial services, insurance, and healthcare sectors. Cleveland is also noted for its association with rock music, as the city is home to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on the shores of Lake Erie

As of the 2000 Census, the city proper had a total population of 478,403, making it the 33rd largest city in the nation and the second largest city in Ohio. It is the center of Greater Cleveland, the largest metropolitan area in Ohio, which spans several counties and is defined in several different ways by the Census Bureau. The Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor Metropolitan Statistical Area has 2,250,871 people and is the 23rd largest in the country, according to the 2000 Census. Cleveland is also part of the larger Cleveland-Akron-Elyria Combined Statistical Area, which is the 14th largest in the country with a population of 2,945,831 according to the 2000 Census.

In studies conducted by The Economist in 2005, Cleveland and Pittsburgh were ranked as the most livable cities in the United States, and the city was ranked as the best city for business meetings in the continental U.S.

Residents of Cleveland are usually referred to as "Clevelanders". Nicknames used for the city include "The Forest City", "The Cleve," "Metropolis of the Western Reserve", "The New American City", "America's North Coast", "Sixth City", and "C-Town".

History

Cleveland obtained its name on July 22, 1796 when surveyors of the Connecticut Land Company laid out Connecticut's Western Reserve into townships and a capital city they named "Cleaveland" after their leader, General Moses Cleaveland. Cleaveland oversaw the plan for the modern downtown area, centered on the Public Square, before returning home, never again to visit Ohio. The first settler in Cleaveland was Lorenzo Carter, who built a cabin on the banks of the Cuyahoga River. The Village of Cleaveland was incorporated on December 23, 1814. The spelling of the city's name was later changed to "Cleveland" when, in 1831, an "a" was dropped so the name could fit a newspaper's masthead.

In spite of the nearby swampy lowlands and harsh winters, its waterfront location proved providential. The area began rapid growth after the 1832 completion of the Ohio and Erie Canal. This key link between the Ohio River and the Great Lakes connected the city to the Atlantic Ocean via the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Gulf of Mexico via the Mississippi River. Growth continued with added railroad links. Cleveland incorporated as a city in 1836.

In 1836, the city, then located only on the eastern banks of the Cuyahoga River, nearly erupted into open warfare with neighboring Ohio City over a bridge connecting the two. Ohio City remained an independent municipality until it was annexed by Cleveland in 1854. The site flourished as a halfway point for iron ore from Minnesota shipped across the Great Lakes and other raw materials (coal) carried by rail from the south. Cleveland emerged as a major American manufacturing center, home to numerous major steel producers, as well as a number of carmakers, including steam car builder White and electric car company Baker. By 1920, Standard Oil founder John D. Rockefeller had made his fortune and Cleveland had become the fifth largest city in the country. The city was a center for the national progressive movement, headed locally by Mayor Tom L. Johnson. Many Clevelanders of this era are buried in the historic Lake View Cemetery, along with James A. Garfield, the twentieth U.S. President.

Climate

Cleveland possesses a humid continental climate, typical of much of the central United States, with very warm, humid summers and cold, snowy winters.



Pg. 461-464: That Sunday morning Purvis was in his hotel room when he received the call about Floyd. He telephoned Hoover in Washington, and the director grudgingly approved Purvis’s plan to charter a plane to Wellsville and supervise the manhunt. At the Wellsville jail, Purvis immediately butted heads with Chief Fultz…..Leaving the jail, Purvis drove to East Liverpool and set up his command post at the Travelers Hotel…..Floyd had just been seen at a farm north of Little Beaver Creek.


WELLSVILLE

Wellsville is a village in Columbiana County, Ohio, along the Ohio River. The population was 4,133 at the 2000 census.

Wellsville is served by the Wellsville Carnegie Public Library. In 2005, the library loaned more than 55,000 items to its 8,000 cardholders. Total holdings as of 2005 are over 36,000 volumes with over 62 periodical subscriptions.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.9 square miles.


EAST LIVERPOOL

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East Liverpool is also a city in Columbiana County, Ohio. The population was 13,089 at the 2000 census. It is located along the Ohio River and borders the states of Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

Long known as the "Pottery Capital of the World," East Liverpool and the immediate area are still home to three major potteries. The city is perhaps best known as the hometown of former University of Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz, and as the city to which the body of slain bank robber Pretty Boy Floyd was taken for embalming.

History

East Liverpool was originally named St. Clair by Thomas Fawcett, one of the earliest land owners, in 1800 after Arthur St. Clair, who at that time was Governor of the Northwest Territory. It was called Fawcettstown for a time by the local residents. It was incorporated as East Liverpool in 1834 when a Liverpool in western Ohio (now defunct) protested the use of its name by this newer eastern town.

James Bennett, an English potter, established the pottery industry in East Liverpool, and it became the community's leading employer. East Liverpool became known as "The Crockery City." East Liverpool once produced more than half of the United States's annual ceramics output. Throughout East Liverpool's famed ceramics history, there were more than 300 potteries. Of these, just three remain: The Hall China Company, the Homer Laughlin China Company (located across the Ohio River in Newell, W.Va.) and Pioneer Pottery.

Among the most famous of East Liverpool's ceramics output was the porcelain known as Lotus Ware. Produced by Knowles, Taylor & Knowles in the 1890s, this Moorish- and Persian-influenced artware swept the competition at the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago. It is generally considered to be the finest porcelain ever produced in the United States. The Museum of Ceramics in downtown East Liverpool has the country's largest public display of Lotus Ware.

Since the mid-1960s or so, East Liverpool's pottery industry has steadily declined. This has been due mostly to the fact that pottery workers in less-developed countries--among them China, South Korea and Taiwan--are paid a small fraction of the hourly wage expected by American workers.

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In the mid-1990s, the city renovated its downtown district, with Great Depression-era lightposts, a new center of town called Devon's Diamond, and the reconstruction of the old High School's clocktower, which is now home of the East Liverpool High School Alumni Association.

Toxic Waste Incinerator

The Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) toxic waste incinerator, the largest such facility in the United States, was completed in 1992. Built near a public school and a flood plain in the city's East End, the incinerator was the target of heated protests from 1990 onwards, led most notably by local nurse Terri Swearingen.


LITTLE BEAVER CREEK

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The Little Beaver Creek represents some Ohio's wildest and most scenic areas. The Little Beaver Creek watershed is located primarily in Columbiana County in northeast Ohio, as well as in portions of Carroll County, Mahoning County, and western Pennsylvania. The creek is protected by a number of classifications, including Ohio Wild and Scenic River and National Scenic River, as well as being part of Ohio's state park system. In fact, it is the only major river in Ohio to have dual State Wild and Scenic and National Scenic River designations. The creek empties into the Ohio River just east of East Liverpool, Ohio.

Little Beaver Creek supports 63 species of fish, 49 mammal species, 140 types of birds and 46 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the rare and protected salamander known as the hellbender. It is an exceptionally clean waterway with a highly diverse ecosystem.

The Little Beaver Creek watershed is home to Beaver Creek State Forest, Beaver Creek State Park, and Sheepskin Hollow State Nature Preserve.



Sources:

http://www.geocities.com/jdillinger34/indiana.html
http://www.imagescrownpoint.com/facts_a ... Glance.php
http://www.johndillingerschicago.zoomsh ... wn%20Point
http://www.monon.monon.org/sobend/merchants.html
http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tnews/Ne ... trId==8255
Wikipedia
Various city sites


Last edited by Liz on Mon Apr 07, 2008 7:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.


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"Dillinger's Trousers of Death"?!? :lol:
That struck me as funny, even though I had to stop reading PE for a while when I read about Dillinger's death.


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Great tidbit as usual Liz. I love the photo of the streetcar down the middle of the wide street in Chicago.

Just curious, the photo below the prison gates of the alley where the cross over was to have been between the jail and the court house in Lake County. Is that the crosswalk in the photo further down in the photo of the jail and courthouse below the old Lake county courthouse photo? It looks like a crosswalk between the second floors.

The Lillian Holley House in Crown Point is another great old Queen Anne house with the round tower rooms and it even has a round gazebo type front porch. I just love old houses.

I am at a crossroads in my opinion of the closing of the Dillinger museum. I hate to loose anything old and historic for future generations, and yes Dillinger is history. Maybe Mr Scalf will open another museum and keep the items from being lost. I can see his relatives not liking the way it is presented ,especially if it is profitable for anyone involved in his capture or demise.

We finally got to Ohio. I dont live there now but was born and raised there. My father was born in Cleveland. His family moved to Akron where he met my mother. I can remember many famous trips to Lake Erie, which is extremely hazardous in stormy weather because it is a shallow lake. My Dad has been in Floridas ocean, surfing, boating and fishing for years but still says Lake Erie is much more dangerous. I also remember laying on the top of cars watching air shows when we were kids in Ohio. Its a beautiful state in the summer but the winter is a bit cold for me.


Last edited by gemini on Mon Apr 07, 2008 7:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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Fansmom, let's not go there. :lol:

Gemini, just to clarify, that is East Chicago, which is in Indiana, although it is very close to Chicago. We will be touring Chicago for a couple of days in the near future.

That does look like a walkway between the courthouse and the jail. And it seems to me that in the past couple of days I read something about him walking between the two.



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Another great tidbit, Liz! The Lake County Court House (not the one where Dillinger was tried but the big one) looks like it could have come from a small town in Texas. The lawsuit over the Dillinger museum, or threat thereof, reminds me of the controversy over Kerouac items we learned about in our discussion of OTR.



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The mysterious lady in the Dillinger court house photo was bothering me so I poked around until I found out who she is. The caption under that photo on another site http://www.hydeparkmedia.com/dillinger.html says:
John Dillinger (in vest) poses in the Crown Point, Indiana jail in 1934. Sheriff Lillian Holley, far left.



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gemini wrote:
The mysterious lady in the Dillinger court house photo was bothering me so I poked around until I found out who she is. The caption under that photo on another site http://www.hydeparkmedia.com/dillinger.html says:
John Dillinger (in vest) poses in the Crown Point, Indiana jail in 1934. Sheriff Lillian Holley, far left.


Thanks so much, gemini, for finding this article. That was interesting reading. A lady sherrif! I'll bet after the movie comes out they will wish they didn't make a parking lot!!

Lady Jill



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Lady Jill wrote:
gemini wrote:
The mysterious lady in the Dillinger court house photo was bothering me so I poked around until I found out who she is. The caption under that photo on another site http://www.hydeparkmedia.com/dillinger.html says:
John Dillinger (in vest) poses in the Crown Point, Indiana jail in 1934. Sheriff Lillian Holley, far left.


Thanks so much, gemini, for finding this article. That was interesting reading. A lady sherrif! I'll bet after the movie comes out they will wish they didn't make a parking lot!!

Lady Jill


I was thinking the same thing Lady Jill, until I noticed at the botton it says the article was first published in the Chicago Tribune on November 4, 1988. Lillian was 96 then and it is hard to imagine but that was 20 years ago they were debating the issue.
I thought the line about his popularity after his death was interesting as they argued whether it was worth a commercial venture.

The town`s distinctive lack of interest in the Depression-era desperado`s exploits goes beyond one family`s sensitivity, it seems. At least two commercial ventures endeavoring to cash in on Dillinger - a man celebrated enough to have lost three tombstones to chiseling souvenir hunters thus far - eventually failed.

Your comment on the Dillinger post about the amusement parks certainly fits here.
" you pave paradise and put up a parking lot!"



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gemini wrote:
Lady Jill wrote:
gemini wrote:
The mysterious lady in the Dillinger court house photo was bothering me so I poked around until I found out who she is. The caption under that photo on another site http://www.hydeparkmedia.com/dillinger.html says:
John Dillinger (in vest) poses in the Crown Point, Indiana jail in 1934. Sheriff Lillian Holley, far left.


Thanks so much, gemini, for finding this article. That was interesting reading. A lady sherrif! I'll bet after the movie comes out they will wish they didn't make a parking lot!!

Lady Jill


I was thinking the same thing Lady Jill, until I noticed at the botton it says the article was first published in the Chicago Tribune on November 4, 1988. Lillian was 96 then and it is hard to imagine but that was 20 years ago they were debating the issue.
I thought the line about his popularity after his death was interesting as they argued whether it was worth a commercial venture.

The town`s distinctive lack of interest in the Depression-era desperado`s exploits goes beyond one family`s sensitivity, it seems. At least two commercial ventures endeavoring to cash in on Dillinger - a man celebrated enough to have lost three tombstones to chiseling souvenir hunters thus far - eventually failed.

Your comment on the Dillinger post about the amusement parks certainly fits here.
" you pave paradise and put up a parking lot!"


Right Gemini, I read that about the tombstone chiseling! Very funny! Guess they better get ready for a few more tombstones. Johnny will make the man all over again.
So the house / jail is long gone. Too bad.



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Lady Jill wrote:
gemini wrote:
Lady Jill wrote:
gemini wrote:
The mysterious lady in the Dillinger court house photo was bothering me so I poked around until I found out who she is. The caption under that photo on another site http://www.hydeparkmedia.com/dillinger.html says:
John Dillinger (in vest) poses in the Crown Point, Indiana jail in 1934. Sheriff Lillian Holley, far left.


Thanks so much, gemini, for finding this article. That was interesting reading. A lady sherrif! I'll bet after the movie comes out they will wish they didn't make a parking lot!!

Lady Jill


I was thinking the same thing Lady Jill, until I noticed at the botton it says the article was first published in the Chicago Tribune on November 4, 1988. Lillian was 96 then and it is hard to imagine but that was 20 years ago they were debating the issue.
I thought the line about his popularity after his death was interesting as they argued whether it was worth a commercial venture.

The town`s distinctive lack of interest in the Depression-era desperado`s exploits goes beyond one family`s sensitivity, it seems. At least two commercial ventures endeavoring to cash in on Dillinger - a man celebrated enough to have lost three tombstones to chiseling souvenir hunters thus far - eventually failed.

Your comment on the Dillinger post about the amusement parks certainly fits here.
" you pave paradise and put up a parking lot!"


Right Gemini, I read that about the tombstone chiseling! Very funny! Guess they better get ready for a few more tombstones. Johnny will make the man all over again.
So the house / jail is long gone. Too bad.


No worries, Lady Jill & Gemini. They are not long gone. I just had to pursue this after reading your discussion here. I just got off the phone with the Crown Point Chamber of Commerce; and here is what I learned:

• The sheriff’s house, jail and criminal court building are still there.

• One can tour the Sheriff's House and the Jail in the summer during their Saturday morning Farmer’s Market (9-noon).

• They also hold tours during certain special town events.

• The Criminal Court Building is now a bar called “The Hall of Justice”, with a restaurant downstairs called Speakeasy 220. (The restaurant name differs from the site I posted below, which is dated 2004, but note the link that follows that one, which is more current).

• She said that PE scouts were in town looking around about a month ago, but she hasn’t heard anything since.


http://www.cpcourthouse.com/photogallery.php?categoryid=4

Speakeasy 220 sponsored Region Idol contest 2007:

http://speakeasy220.com/2007/03/22/httpwwwspeakeasy220comreginalidol.aspx



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Liz wrote:
Lady Jill wrote:
gemini wrote:
Lady Jill wrote:
gemini wrote:
The mysterious lady in the Dillinger court house photo was bothering me so I poked around until I found out who she is. The caption under that photo on another site http://www.hydeparkmedia.com/dillinger.html says:
John Dillinger (in vest) poses in the Crown Point, Indiana jail in 1934. Sheriff Lillian Holley, far left.


Thanks so much, gemini, for finding this article. That was interesting reading. A lady sherrif! I'll bet after the movie comes out they will wish they didn't make a parking lot!!

Lady Jill


I was thinking the same thing Lady Jill, until I noticed at the botton it says the article was first published in the Chicago Tribune on November 4, 1988. Lillian was 96 then and it is hard to imagine but that was 20 years ago they were debating the issue.
I thought the line about his popularity after his death was interesting as they argued whether it was worth a commercial venture.

The town`s distinctive lack of interest in the Depression-era desperado`s exploits goes beyond one family`s sensitivity, it seems. At least two commercial ventures endeavoring to cash in on Dillinger - a man celebrated enough to have lost three tombstones to chiseling souvenir hunters thus far - eventually failed.

Your comment on the Dillinger post about the amusement parks certainly fits here.
" you pave paradise and put up a parking lot!"


Right Gemini, I read that about the tombstone chiseling! Very funny! Guess they better get ready for a few more tombstones. Johnny will make the man all over again.
So the house / jail is long gone. Too bad.


No worries, Lady Jill & Gemini. They are not long gone. I just had to pursue this after reading your discussion here. I just got off the phone with the Crown Point Chamber of Commerce; and here is what I learned:

• The sheriff’s house, jail and criminal court building are still there.

• One can tour the Sheriff's House and the Jail in the summer during their Saturday morning Farmer’s Market (9-noon).

• They also hold tours during certain special town events.

• The Criminal Court Building is now a bar called “The Hall of Justice”, with a restaurant downstairs called Speakeasy 220. (The restaurant name differs from the site I posted below, which is dated 2004, but note the link that follows that one, which is more current).

• She said that PE scouts were in town looking around about a month ago, but she hasn’t heard anything since.


http://www.cpcourthouse.com/photogallery.php?categoryid=4

Speakeasy 220 sponsored Region Idol contest 2007:

http://speakeasy220.com/2007/03/22/httpwwwspeakeasy220comreginalidol.aspx


Oh thank you Liz, It should not surprise me anymore the length you and DITHOT will go to find out the facts. This is great! As I read the article, like Lady Jill, the thought that these places could still be used in the film was in the back of my mind. The article left it that it was not hopeful that anything would still be there especially over so many years. It would be great if they could use the real buildings and following Lady Jill's line of thought, They will sure be glad they still have those buildings now.


Last edited by gemini on Mon Apr 07, 2008 7:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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Yes, Thanks Liz. What great reports. Nice to see they weren't torn down. And maybe into the movie??? Crown Point could probably use a little Depp attention! Maybe even for their charities, like Johnny likes to help out!

Lady Jill



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I have decided to insert into this tidbit for posterity some recent pics from the filming at Crown Point. The photos were taken by KYwoman.



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