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 Post subject: Public Enemies Tidbit #16 - Iowa and Sioux Falls
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 2:40 pm 
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Ya got trouble,
Right here in River city!
With a capital "T"
And that rhymes with "P"
And that stands for Pool.
We've surely got trouble!
Right here in River City!

Yes, we got trouble in Iowa and South Dakota, my friends…..


Pg. 75:

Dexter, Iowa
Sunday, July 23

That Sunday, as Gus Jones assumed command at the Urshel home in Oklahoma City, a man named Henry Nye took a walk near his farm outside of Dexter, Iowa, a town twenty miles west of Des Moines. Walking down a country lane, he approached an open field where ten years earlier there had been an amusement park called Dexfield Park. These days the twenty-acre field, bordered by tall maples, heavy underbrush, and a coil of the Middle Raccoon River, functioned mostly as a lovers’ lane, Through the trees, Nye spotted a 1933 Ford. There were people beside it. At first he thought they were campers. Then he spotted a shirt thrown on the ground. It was caked in what appeared to be blood. Nye hurried to his house and telephoned the town night watchman.

Cyde had found the field three days earlier, on Thursday, the afternoonafter fleeing the shoot-out at Platte City. Their campsite, a collection of blankets and seat cushions scattered on the grass, resembled a field hospital. Somehow Buck was alive.


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Dexter is a city in Dallas County, Iowa, founded in 1868. The population was 689 at the 2000 census. Dexter was named after the famous trotting horse Dexter.

The city is famous for being the site of a shootout between members of the Barrow gang and police from nearby Des Moines, and also for being the site of a plowing match where President Harry Truman delivered a speech attacking the 80th Congress for its record in regard to the American farmer. This speech is considered one of the most important of his 1948 Whistle Stop campaign that turned the tide of the election and returned him to the White House.

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The Historical Marker Project (see below) seeks to commemorate the site of the old Dexfield Park enjoyed by Dexter and the surrounding community from 1915-1933.

The old Dexfield Park was located aprox. 3 miles north of Dexter on what is currently Dexfield Rd. If you take that short drive north and as you head down the hill toward the river, just before you get to the bridge, look off to the right in the flat spot between the hill and the river. There is probably some sort of corn or bean field there now, but in the early 1900's this was the place to be. Hundreds and hundreds of people would gather on Sunday's to take advantage of the entertainment opportunity's offered there. Recently markers were constructed to commemorate Dexfield Park. See the stones below:

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Bonnie & Clyde shootout aftermath (Blanche screaming on the left)

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Buck Barrow on the ground after the shooting

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Buck was taken to the King's Daughters Hospital in Perry, Iowa, where he died
five days later, at 2 o'clock on Saturday July 29, 1933.

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Bonnie, Clyde, and W.D. escaped across the Raccoon River after the shootout.

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Dexter Posse after the shooting

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Posses comb woods

W.D.’s Account of the Dexter incident from the Dexter Museum:

http://www.dexteriowa.org/index.php?page=w-d-jones-account



Finally on to Dillinger….

Pg. 251: Green and Van Meter had spent the weekend in Mason City studying the layout of the First National Bank, staying in a room at the YMCA. They briefed the others, who had driven down from St. Paul. Everyone knew this was a high-risk job. Years of robberies had turned many Midwestern banks into small fortresses, and the Mason City bank, located on the town’s main square, was Iowa’s Fort Knox….

MASON CITY

• Mason City is located in Cerro Gordo County in Northern Iowa.
• Mason City is the largest urban center in North Iowa and is located 120 miles North of Des Moines, Iowa and 135 miles South of Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota.
• The population of Mason City is approximately 27,740 people.
• In 1999, Mason City was ranked as the nation's 10th best city to live in, according to The New Rating Guide to Life in America's Small Cities.
• The average winter temperature in Mason City is 18.2 degrees Fahrenheit and the average summer temperature is 70.7 degrees Fahrenheit.
• The average annual rainfall in Mason City is 31.4 inches while the average annual snowfall is 37.8 inches.
• The Mason City school district falls in the top 15% in the United States in academic student achievement tests.
• Mason City is home to a four-year college, a four-year vocational/technical college and a two-year community college.
• Mercy Medical Center – North Iowa has been named one of the nation’s 100 Top Hospitals for the past four consecutive years. They were also named a Top 100 Cardiovascular Hospital in the fall of 2004.

Musical Heritage

Mason City, above all else is known for its outstanding musical heritage, consistently producing successful performers and educators. Mason City's "favorite son" Meredith Willson grew up in Mason City, having played in the Mason City Symphonic Band as a student at Mason City High School. Willson's crowning achievement was the famous musical The Music Man. Mason City was the inspiration for River City
(the chorus with which I began this tidbit) in "The Music Man," which debuted on Broadway on December 19, 1957, and ran for 1,376 performances. The popular musical later came alive on the big screen in a Hollywood adaptation starring Shirley Jones and Robert Preston. The musical was nominated for nine Tony Awards and won six, including Best Musical. Mason City has erected a multi-million dollar complex adjoining his boyhood home, not only to honor him but to sustain the spirit of "River City, Iowa."

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A loss for the music world: On February 3, 1959, singer and musician Buddy Holly gave a performance at the Surf Ballroom's Winter Dance Party in Clear Lake. Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson boarded a private plane at the Mason City Airport to travel to their next engagement. The flight was barely off the ground when icy weather caused the plane to crash in a field near Clear Lake. A memorial to the three rock 'n' roll legends stands in the field today, commemorating "The Day the Music Died."

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One of the pillars behind the ongoing success of Mason City's musical tradition is the tenure of its music educators. The Mason City High School Instrumental Department has had only 6 Head Instructors in its 100 years of existence and similarly can be said for the Vocal Department. Alumni frequently return to teach at their alma matter, most recently Mason City Symphonic Band director Russell Kramer 88' and John Adams Middle School band director Prof. Aaron R. Anderson 2005.

The High School band is representing Iowa in Chicago for the National Band Conference.

Currently, the music program at Mason City High School involves more than 25% of the student population in its numerous ensembles.

Architecture and the Prairie School

Mason City is widely known for its sizable amount of Prairie School architecture, the largest concentration in one location outside of Oak Park, Illinois. A number of architects from the Prairie School movement designed both commercial and residential buildings in Mason City in the early 1900's, many of which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The most notable architect to have worked in Mason City is Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright designed the Park Inn Hotel and City National Bank in 1909 on State and Federal Avenues in downtown Mason City. The Park Inn Hotel is the only remaining Frank Lloyd Wright designed hotel in the world. Wright designed just six hotels and two banks during his career. The Park Inn Hotel served as the prototype for the Imperial Hotel, Tokyo, which was torn down in 1962. The hotel influenced Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius and other European Modern architects. After decades of deterioration and vacancy, the hotel is in the process of being restored and is the recipient grants from the National Park Service Save America's Treasures grant and grant from the State of Iowa.

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Park Inn Hotel

The Stockman House was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built in 1908 for Dr. George and Eleanor Stockman. It was fully restored and is open to the public and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It features numerous authentic period furnishings and reproduction pieces.

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The Stockman House

Mason City, Iowa 1923 City Directory Page 149, which includes the address for the First National Bank at the bottom of the page:

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The First National Bank is now called the City Center and remains a historic treasure in downtown Mason City:

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River City Days at the City Center Building (formerly First National Bank)

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City Center Building

The YMCA where Green and Van Meter stayed:

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WATERLOO

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Pg 377: Tommy Carroll dies in Waterloo, Iowa.

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Tommy Carroll in the Hospital

Waterloo is the county seat of Black Hawk County, Iowa, United States. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 68,747. It belongs to the Cedar Falls-Waterloo Metropolitan Statistical Area, and is the larger of the two cities, by population.

Climate: The normal low in January is 6.3° F and the normal high in July is 85°.

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History

Waterloo was first settled in 1845 when George and Mary Hanna and their children arrived on the east bank of the Red Cedar River (now just called the Cedar River). They were followed by the Virden and Mullan families in 1846. Evidence of these earliest families can still be found in Waterloo (Mullan Avenue and Virden Creek).

There were two extended periods of rapid growth over the next 115 years. From 1895 to 1915, the population increased from 8,490 to 33,097 a 290% increase. From 1925 to 1960, population increased from 36,771 to 71,755. The 1895 to 1915 period was a time of the rapid growth in manufacturing, rail transportation and wholesale operations. It was during this period that the Waterloo Gasoline Traction Engine Company moved to Waterloo and was shortly after Rath Packing Company had relocated from Dubuque. Another major employer in Waterloo throughout the first 2/3 of the 20th century was the Illinois Central Railroad.

Waterloo suffered particularly hard in the agricultural recession of the 1980’s, due to the major employers at the time being heavily rooted in agriculture. In particular, John Deere, the area’s largest employer, cut 10,000 jobs, and the Rath meatpacking plant closed altogether, losing 2500 jobs. It is estimated that Waterloo lost 14% of its population during this time. Today the city enjoys a broader industrial base, as city leaders have sought to diversify the industrial and commercial mix. John Deere remains a strong presence in the city, but employs only roughly half of jobs it did at its peak.

Waterloo was originally known as “Prairie Rapids Crossing”. The town was built on top of a Native American village. The town is now named after Waterloo, Belgium. The city’s primary waterway is the Cedar River.




SIOUX FALLS, South Dakota

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Pg: The temperature hung at the freezing point as the green Packard sedan pulled up in front of the Security National Bank & Trust Company a few minutes before ten. Six men in dark overcoats stepped out into the street, glancing about , wisps of steam rising from their lips…..Dillinger led Nelson and the others inside.

Sioux Falls Webcam:

http://www.siouxfalls.org/Information/webcam_falls.aspx

Fun Facts

• Sioux Falls has 4,000 hotel rooms
• Sioux Falls boasts over 500 restaurants in the city limits.
• Number of sunny days in Sioux Falls a year=230
• Number of city parks in Sioux Falls =80
• Sioux Falls is the largest shopping center between Minneapolis and Denver .
• The Falls of the Big Sioux River at Falls Park gush over pink quartzite rock, which is rare to find in deposits as large and widespread as those found in the Sioux Falls region. Pink quartzite is a very hard rock, which makes it perfect for construction use in a variety of applications.

The history of Sioux Falls revolves around the cascades of the Big Sioux River. The falls were created about 14,000 years ago when the last glacial ice sheet redirected the flow of the river into the large looping bends of its present course. Fueled by water from the melting ice, the river exposed the underlying Sioux quartzite bedrock, the hard pinkish stone of the falls. The quartzite itself is about a billion and a half years old. It began as sediments deposited on the bottom of an ancient, shallow sea.

The lure of the falls has been a powerful influence. A prehistoric people who inhabited the region before 500 B.C. left numerous burial mounds on the high bluffs near the river. These people were followed by an agricultural society that built fortified villages on many of the same sites. Tribes of the Lakota and Dakota, widely ranging nomadic bison hunters, arrived sometime around the 18th century. Early maps indicate they used the falls as a place to rendezvous with French fur trappers, considered the first European visitors at the falls.

The falls also drew the attention of early explorers. An August 1804 journal entry of the Lewis and Clark expedition describes the falls of the "Soues River." Famous pathfinder John C. Fremont and French scientist Joseph Nicollet explored the region in 1838 and also write a description of the falls. Both are considered second hand accounts rather than evidence of an actual visit.

The first documented visit was by Philander Prescott, an explorer, trader, and trapper who camped overnight at the falls in December 1832. Captain James Allen led a military expedition out of Fort Des Moines in 1844. The early descriptions of the falls were published in The States and Territories of the Great West, an 1856 book by Jacob Ferris which inspired townsite developers to seek out the falls.

The focus of intense land speculation activity in Minnesota and Iowa during the mid-1850s inevitably turned toward the Big Sioux River valley. Sioux Falls was founded by land speculators who hoped to build great wealth by claiming prime townsites before the arrival of railroads and settlers.

Two separate groups, the Dakota Land Company of St. Paul and the Western Town Company of Dubuque, Iowa organized in 1856 to claim the land around the falls, considering a promising townsite for its beauty and water power. The Western Town Company arrived first, and was soon followed by the St. Paul-based company in 1857. Each laid out 320-acre claims, but worked together for mutual protection. They built a temporary barricade of turf which they dubbed "Fort Sod," in response to hostilities threatened by native tribes. Seventeen men then spent "the first winter" in Sioux Falls. The following year the population grew to near 40.

Although conflicts in Minnehaha County between American Indians and white settlers were few, the Dakota War of 1862 engulfed nearby southwestern Minnesota. The town was evacuated in August of that year when two local settlers were killed as a result of the conflict. The settlers and soldiers stationed here traveled to Yankton in late August 1862. The abandoned townsite was pillaged and burned.

Fort Dakota, a military reservation established in present day downtown, was established in May of 1865. Many former settlers gradually returned, and a new wave of settlers arrived in the following years. The population grew to 593 by 1873, and a building boom was underway in that year.

The Village of Sioux Falls, consisting of 1,200 acres, was incorporated in 1876 by the 12th legislative assembly of the Dakota Territory, which convened in the territorial capital of Yankton. The village charter proved to be too restrictive, however, and Sioux Falls petitioned to become a city. The city charter was granted by the Dakota Territorial legislature on March 3, 1883.

The arrival of the railroads ushered in the great Dakota Boom decade of the 1880s. The population of Sioux Falls mushroomed from 2,164 in 1880 to 10,167 at the close of the decade. The growth transformed the city. A severe plague of grasshoppers and a national depression halted the boom by the early 1890s. The city grew by only 89 people from 1890 to 1900.

But prosperity eventually returned. Key milestones include the opening of the John Morrell meat packing plant in 1909, the establishment of an airbase and a military radio and communications training school in 1942, and the completion of the interstate highways in the early 1960s. Sioux Falls has been marked by impressive growth throughout the 20th century, and development continues at a strong pace today.

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South on Phillips Ave. Sioux Falls. So. Dakota, Aug. 30, 1958





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The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 4:29 pm 
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Hey, my cousin who lives in Sioux Falls is a county commissioner for Minnehaha County. I'll tell him to vote "yes" if any film crews come scouting!


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 7:42 pm 
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fansmom wrote:
Hey, my cousin who lives in Sioux Falls is a county commissioner for Minnehaha County. I'll tell him to vote "yes" if any film crews come scouting!


And a little insider information would be helpful. :cool: How does one apply for that location scouting position, I wonder? :grin:



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You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 7:52 pm 
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Very :interesting: Liz.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 7:54 pm 
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Some nice locations here; Mason City looks like a good place to live, one way and another... assuming no Dillingers around.



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 7:58 pm 
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Sioux Falls is a nice place.
South Dakota is beautiful.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 8:32 pm 
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[b]I was hoping you would cover Mason City, Liz. Some of my ils are from that part of Iowa. That bridge in Waterloo is cool! :cool: The picture from Dexfield Park just after the shootout is a great one. The real Blanche complained, "That movie made me look like a screaming horse's ass." Uh...Blanche??? [/b] :lol:



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Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 7:04 pm 
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Another great tidbit Liz. I love that great old photo in Souix Falls with all those old cars.
DITHIT, I think I would scream too if I had glass in my eyes and my husband was mortally wounded. Blanche Barrow sounds like another one of those women who led a rough life. When she was 17 , her mother forced her to marry an old man and she ran away after a year. She says after that she could never have kids. She was a tiny thing 5 feet 1" and weighed 81 pounds. She was another one that never fired a gun but was sentenced to 10 yerars, served 6, for beng with her husband. She had convinced Buck to turn himself in at one point but he later joined his brother Clyde. She lost the sight in one eye due to her injuries. Here is a wanted poster I found of her.

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Last edited by gemini on Thu Jan 31, 2008 6:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 10:56 pm 
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gemini, that is a great find on the poster. I agree I would have been a scraming crazy woman at that point myself. You can see in the picture how horrifying the experience must have been. I just found it ironic that she didn't see herself that way. She must have been a very strong woman.



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Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 12:23 am 
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Great pic, Gemini. Thanks for posting it!

I wonder if that book by John Neal Phillips (Blanche’s memoirs) is any good.



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