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 Post subject: Public Enemies Tidbit #12 - OTR to Minnesota
PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 11:30 am 
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Noodlemantras, we are about to go on the road for a 10-day tour of “Dillingerland”, USA. You’ll be able to chase the illusive “Road Runner” and his friends from the safety of your computer. So get out your board pieces (pg. 344) and put them on GO....Minnesota. You might need this free pass:

Image


Image
Minneapolis Skyline


Image
St. Paul Skyline


Minneapolis, 1915:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v223/Liz-ONBC/Public%20Enemies/St%20Paul/Panorama-Minneapolis-1915L.jpg

Minneapolis-Saint Paul is the most populous urban area in the state of Minnesota, United States, and is composed of 188 cities and townships. Built around the Mississippi, Minnesota and St. Croix rivers, the area is also nicknamed the Twin Cities for its two largest cities, Minneapolis and Saint Paul, the state capital. The area is part of a larger U.S. Census division named Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI, the country's 16th-largest metropolitan area composed of eleven counties in Minnesota and two counties in Wisconsin. This larger area in turn is enveloped in the U.S. Census combined statistical area called Minneapolis-St. Paul-St. Cloud, MN-WI with an estimated population of 3.5 million people in 2006, ranked the 13th most populous in the U.S.

To remind everyone there were actually two cities, people started using the phrase Dual Cities around 1872, which evolved into Twin Cities. Despite the "Twin" moniker, the two cities are quite distinct from each other. Minneapolis, with its broad boulevards, easily navigable grid layout, and modern downtown architecture, has been referred to as the "first" (i.e. furthest east) city of the American West; Saint Paul, which sports narrower streets laid out much more irregularly, clannish neighborhoods, and a vast collection of well preserved late-Victorian architecture, is considered to be the "last" (i.e. farthest west) of the Eastern cities. Also of some note is the differing cultural backgrounds of the two cities: Minneapolis being affected by its early (and still influential) Scandinavian/Lutheran heritage, while St. Paul was touched by its early Irish and German Catholic roots.

Often, the area is referred to as simply "The Cities," both within Minnesota, but generally outside the metropolitan region, and even in the bordering states of Iowa, Wisconsin, and the Dakotas. Areas of Minnesota outside of the Twin Cities are collectively referred to as "outstate" by people from the Twin Cities metro area. Today, the two cities directly border each other and their downtown districts are about 10 miles (16 km) apart. The Twin Cities are generally said to be in "east central" Minnesota. The Cities draw commuters from as far away as Rochester, St. Cloud, Mankato and Eau Claire.


The Region

The U.S. Census Bureau defines the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington Metropolitan Statistical Area as a region of eleven counties in Minnesota and two in neighboring Wisconsin, an area which had a population of nearly three million people (2,968,805) in 2000. The area is growing rapidly; its population is projected to increase to four million in 20 years, and the Minnesota counties in this area were estimated to have a population of 3,090,377 as of April 1, 2005. When speaking of the Twin Cities however many locals are referring to an older seven-county area entirely within Minnesota, which is under the jurisdiction of the Metropolitan Council. It is common for out of state Minnesotans to refer to the area as The Cities. The majority of state residents live in the Twin Cities region, although fewer than one in four people in the metro lives in the two core cities. The area is one of several distinct regions of Minnesota.

Bloomington, Minnesota, home of the Mall of America
(with 520 stores and it’s own amusement park, that’s just where I’d want to go shopping with my pre-schooler—but I guess it’s a teenager’s dream come true) http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v223/Liz-ONBC/Public%20Enemies/St%20Paul/Mall_of_America-2005-05-29.jpg , is the third-largest city in the metro area and is in close contention for third place in the state, coming in at just about the same size as Duluth and Rochester in the 2000 census. (While most locals do not consider Bloomington to be a major city but a very large suburb, since the 2000 census it has been included as a named city in what is now termed the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington MSA.)

There are multiple "rings" of suburbs extending outward from the core area, and having two central cities can make it difficult for visitors or new residents to learn the arrangement of cities and towns. There are 188 municipalities in the seven-county region alone, and there are 334 in the eleven-county region.

Minneapolis and St. Paul have competed for attention ever since they were founded, sometimes resulting in a fair amount of duplication of effort. The two cities have sometimes tried to outdo one another by building bigger or more extravagantly. Both cities have campuses of the University of Minnesota, for instance (although the Minneapolis campus is much bigger today), and after St. Paul completed its elaborate Cathedral in 1915, Minneapolis quickly followed up with the equally ostentatious Basilica of St. Mary in 1926. In the late 19th and early 20th-centuries the rivalries became so intense that an architect practicing in one city was often refused business in the other. The rivalry could occasionally erupt into inter-city violence, as happened at a 1923 game between the Minneapolis Millers and the St. Paul Saints, both of the American Association.

In the 1950s, both cities competed for a major league baseball franchise (which resulted in two rival stadiums being built), and there was a brief period in the mid-1960s where the two cities could not agree on a common calendar for daylight saving time, resulting in a period of a few weeks where people in Minneapolis were one hour "ahead" of anyone living or traveling in St. Paul.
The cities' mutual antagonism was largely healed by the end of the 1960s, aided by the simultaneous arrival in 1961 of the Minnesota Twins of the American League and the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League, both of which identified themselves with the state as a whole (the former explicitly named for both Twin Cities) and not with either of the major cities (unlike the earlier Minneapolis Lakers). Since 1961, it has been common practice for any major sports team based in the Twin Cities to be named for Minnesota as a whole.


Early History

The first European settlement in the region was near what is now known as the town of Stillwater, Minnesota. The city is approximately 20 miles (30 km) from downtown Saint Paul and lies on the western bank of the St. Croix River, which forms the border of central Minnesota and Wisconsin. Another settlement that began fueling early interest in the area was the outpost at Fort Snelling, which was constructed from 1820 to 1825 at the confluence of the Minnesota River and the Mississippi River.

Fort Snelling held jurisdiction over the land south of Saint Anthony Falls, thus a town known as Saint Anthony grew just north of the river. For several years, the only European resident to live on the south bank of the river was Colonel John H. Stevens, who operated a ferry service across the river. As soon as the land area controlled by Fort Snelling was reduced, new settlers began flocking across to the new village of Minneapolis. The town grew quickly, and Minneapolis and Saint Anthony eventually merged. On the eastern side of the Mississippi, a few villages such as Pig's Eye and Lambert's Landing developed and would soon grow to become Saint Paul.

Natural geography played a role in the settlement and development of the two cities. The Mississippi River valley in this area is defined by a series of stone bluffs that line both sides of the river. Saint Paul grew up around Lambert's Landing, the last place to unload boats coming upriver at an easily accessible point, some seven miles (11 km) downstream from Saint Anthony Falls, the geographic feature that defined the location of Minneapolis and its prominence as the Mill City.

The oldest farms in the state are located in Washington County, the eastern most county on the Minnesota side of the metropolitan area. Lake Elmo, just southwest of Stillwater, began with one farm in 1852 on the southwest corner of the intersection of what is now Manning Avenue and 30th Street, just east of downtown Lake Elmo. The barn, built in 1875, was restored in 1998 and still stands today, renovated as a house. The 1852 farmhouse was intentionally burned down in March 2007.

The Grand Excursion, a trip into the Upper Midwest sponsored by the Rock Island Railroad, brought more than a thousand curious travelers into the area by rail and steamboat in 1854. The next year, in 1855, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow published The Song of Hiawatha, an epic poem based on the Ojibwe legends of Hiawatha. A number of natural area landmarks were included in the story, such as Lake Minnetonka and Minnehaha Falls. Tourists inspired by the coverage of the Grand Excursion in eastern newspapers and those who read Longfellow's story flocked to the area in the following decades.

At one time, the region also had numerous passenger rail services, including both interurban streetcar systems and interstate rail. Due to the width of the river at points further south, the Minneapolis-Saint Paul area was briefly one of the few places where the Mississippi could be crossed by railroad. A great amount of commercial rail traffic also ran through the area, often carrying grain to be processed at mills in Minneapolis or delivering other goods to Saint Paul to be transported along the Mississippi. Saint Paul had long been at the head of navigation on the river, prior to new lock and dam facilities being added upriver in Minneapolis.

Passenger travel hit its peak in 1888 with nearly eight million traversing to and from the Saint Paul Union Depot. This amounted to approximately 150 trains daily. Before long, other rail crossings were built farther south and travel through the region began to decline. In an effort by the rail companies to combat the rise of the automobile, some of the earliest streamliners ran from Chicago to Minneapolis/Saint Paul and eventual served distant points in the Pacific Northwest. Today, the only vestige of this interstate service comes by Amtrak's Empire Builder service, running once daily in each direction. That train is named after James J. Hill, a railroad tycoon who settled on Summit Avenue in Saint Paul at what is now known as the James J. Hill House.


Geography and Geology

Along with much of Minnesota, the Twin Cities area was shaped by water and ice over the course of millions of years. The land of the area sits on top of thick layers of sandstone and limestone laid down as seas encroached upon and receded from the region. Erosion caused natural caves to develop, which were expanded into mines when white settlers came to the area. In the time of Prohibition, at least one speakeasy was built into these hidden spaces—eventually refurbished as the Wabasha Street Caves in Saint Paul.

While a few of the caverns have been cleaned up and are safe places, most are not. Over the decades, many people have been injured and killed while exploring them. A number of these incidents involved asphyxiation, sometimes caused by smoldering fires which used up much of the oxygen in the caves and left deadly levels of noxious gases behind.

Because it is comparatively easy to dig through limestone and there are many natural and man-made open spaces, it has often been proposed that the area should examine the idea of building subways for public transportation. In theory, it could be less expensive in the Twin Cities than in many other places, but the cost would still be much greater than surface projects. Additionally, a number of existing utility lines would have to be moved. There are extensive networks under the cities, particularly in Saint Paul where at least seven distinct tunnel systems have been built since the 1840s. Most are still used today.

Lakes across the area were formed and altered by the movement of glaciers. This left many bodies of water in the region, and unusual shapes may appear. For example, Lake Minnetonka out toward the western side of the Twin Cities consists of a complex arrangement of channels and large bays requiring a series of bridges. Elevations in the metropolitan area range from 1,376 feet (419 m) above sea level in the northwest metro to 666 feet (203 m) at the edge of the Mississippi River in the southeast. On August 1, 2007 the eight-lane Interstate 35W Mississippi River Bridge, responsible for carrying 140,000 vehicles daily, collapsed, killing thirteen and injuring one hundred.

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It is the third most northern U.S. metropolitan area in the lower 48 states, after Seattle, Washington and Portland, Oregon.


Climate

Owing to its northerly latitude and inland location, the Twin Cities experiences the coldest climate of any major metropolitan area in the United States. However due to its southern location in the state and aided further by the urban heat island, the Twin Cities is one of the warmest locations in Minnesota. The average annual temperature at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport is 45.4 °F (7.4 °C); 3.5 °F colder than Winona, Minnesota, and 8.8 °F warmer than Roseau, Minnesota. Monthly average daily high temperatures range from 21.9 °F (-5.6 °C) in January to 83.3 °F (28.5 °C) in July; the average daily minimum temperatures for the two months are 4.3 °F (-15.4 °C) and 63.0 °F (17 °C) respectively.
No wonder Hoover’s men were always using the cold as an excuse.

Minimum temperatures of 0 °F (-18 °C) or lower are seen on an average of 29.7 days per year, and 76.2 days do not have a maximum temperature exceeding the freezing point. Temperatures above 90 °F (32 °C) occur an average of 15 times per year. High temperatures above 100 °F have been rare in recent years; the last occurring in July, 2006, during an unusually hot period in which the high temperature exceeded 90 °F on 17 of July's 31 days. The lowest temperature ever reported at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport was -34 °F (-36.6 °C) on January 22, 1936; the highest, 108 °F (42 °C), was reported on July 14 of the same year.

Precipitation averages 29.41 in (74.7 cm) per year, and is most plentiful in June (4.34 in, 11 cm) and February (0.79 in, 2 cm) the least so. The greatest one-day rainfall amount was 9.15 in (23.2 cm), reported on July 23, 1987. The city's record for lowest annual precipitation was set in 1910, when 11.54 in (29.3 cm) fell throughout the year; coincidentally, the opposite record was set the following year, which observed a total 40.15 in (102 cm). At an average of 56.3 in (143 cm) per year, snowfall is generally abundant (though some recent years have proved an exception).

The Twin Cities area takes the brunt of many types of extreme weather, including high-speed straight-line winds, tornadoes, flash floods, drought, heat, bitter cold, and blizzards. The costliest weather disaster in Twin Cities history was a derecho event on May 15, 1998. Hail and Wind damage exceeded $950 million, much of it in the Twin Cities.Other memorable Twin Cities weather related events include the tornado outbreak on May 6, 1965, the Armistice Day Blizzard on November 11, 1940, and the Halloween Blizzard of 1991.




The following St. Paul photos and captions relevant to Public Enemies were found on www.geomyidae.com. I cannot vouch for their authenticity.


Image
1878 Jefferson Avenue
Underworld banker Sawyer, who supervised St. Paul's O'Connor system after the murder of Danny Hogan,
hosted underworld parties in this two-story house.


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Edgecumbe Court Apartments
1095 Osceola Avenue
Known to the FBI as a "lamsters hideout," these apartments were home to many of
America's most-wanted bank robbers and prison escapees from 1931 to 1933.



Image
Cretin Court Apartments
50 S. Cretin Avenue
This 3 1/2 story brick building was once the home of bank robber Francis "Jimmy" Keating, one of the
"Evergreen bandits" hunted by the FBI.



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Ma Barker's hideout
1031 S. Robert Street
West St. Paul
The Barker-Karpis gang, which rented this house from the Hannegraf family in February 1932, escaped a police raid
after being tipped off by corrupt officers. Owner Helen Hannegraf lived next door at 1035 S. Robert Street.


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The Como Park Slaying of Oscar Erckson
Near Como Zoo
During the get-a-way from their December 16, 1932, bank robbery in Minneapolis, the Barker-Karpis gang stopped
in Como Park to switch cars. Unaware of the robbery, Christmas tree salesman Oscar Erickson slowed down to look
and was shot to death by Fred Barker.


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Cle-mar Apartments
2062 Marshall Avenue
Thsi four-story red-brick apartment building was home to Katherine "Ma" Barker, con man Earl Christman,
kidnapper Bernard "Big Phil" Phillips, and other members of the Barker-Karpis gang.


Image
Grand Avenue Apartments
1290 Grand Avenue
In February 1933, the Barker-Karpis gang set up headquarters in the four-story brick
apartment building - but were forced to flee in March after a tip-off of an impending police raid.


Image
Commodore Hotel
79 Western Avenue
Opened in 1920, the hotel and its elegant art deco bar attracted literary figures F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald as
well as gangsters Al Capone and Fred Barker. The hotel was renovated in the 1970s but still looks much like it did
when Ma Barker met her son Fred's girlfriend here.


Image
Hollyhocks Club casino
1590 S. Mississippi Blvd.
Hosted by fixer Jack Peifer, this club overlooking the river bluffs was a favorite haven for members of the Dillinger
and Barker-Karpis gangs. The facade was significantly renovated in the early 1990s, but the circular driveway and
expansive lawn still evoke its gangster-era splendor.


Image
Hideout of the Vernon Street Gang
204 Vernon Street
During the Hamm kidnapping, this two-story house near Maclester College housed a
convention of public enemies, including Fred and Doc Barker, Frank "Jelly" Nash and Alvin Karpis.


Image
The Kennington
565 Portland Avenue
Shoplifter Myrtle Eaton offered her apartment 104 in this red brick building as a hideout for the Barker-Karpis gang
before the Bremer kidnapping.



Image
Holly Falls Apartments
562 Holly Avenue
On January 13, 1934 Roy McCord, wearing his Northwest Airlines radio operator's uniform, was mistaken for a police
officer by Alvin Karpis and severely wounded near this four-story brick building in a hail of gunfire.


Image
Dr. Nels Mortensen's home
2252 Fairmount Avenue
Just after midnight on March 13 1934, Dr. Nels Mortensen answered his doorbell and found wounded gangsters
John Dillinger and John Hamilton on his front steps.


Image
Shootout at the Lincoln Court Apartments
93 S. Lexington Pkwy.
On the morning of March 13, 1934, FBI agents and police knocked on the door of Lincoln Court apartment 303 on a
landlady's hunch - inadvertently stumbling into a gun battle with John Dillinger and Homer Van Meter. Dillinger's
third-floor apartment, where he lived with girlfriend Billie Frechette, overlooked Lexington Pkwy.


Image
Tommy Carroll's hideout (demolished)
35 W. Isabel Street
Tommy Carroll (of the Dillinger gang) rented the upper floor of this house from the Vogel family during the spring
and summer of 1932. He lived there with singer "Radio Sally" Bennett.


Image
The Dillinger gang's weapons depot
2214 Marshall Avenue
In his hasty escape from the Lincoln Court shootout, John Dillinger left behind a note with
the telephone number of gang member Eddie Green, traced by FBI agents to this three-story
red-brick building in the Merriam Park Neighborhood. Green rented apartment 106, on the
east side of the building, for two weeks in March 1934.


Image
New St. Paul police headquarters
100 E. Eleventh Street
The St. Paul police headquarters was renovated in the mid-1980s but the facade is similar to that of the 1930s, when
a St. Paul Daily News wiretap of police telephone lines exposed ties between gangsters and law enforcers.


Image
Holman Municipal Airport (now St. Paul Downtown Airport)
644 Bayfield Street
After his capture in New Orleans on May 1, 1936, Alvin Karpis, accompanied by FBI director J. Edgar Hoover and scores
of special agents, was flown to Holman Airport and brought to St. Paul to stand trial for the Hamm and Bremer kidnappings.


Image
St. Paul City Hall and Ramsey County Courthouse
15 Kellogg Blvd. W.
The art Deco courthouse was the site of the 1933 trail of Roger Touhy, which took place
on the eighth floor. The 1935 police corruption trials, sparked by wiretaps, occurred in the
eleventh-floor courtrooms.



And one of my finds:

Image
Ancker Hospital, St. Paul, where Eddie Green
was taken after being gunned down by FBI
agents. This photo dates back to 1913. It
was still at this location in 1934.




Brainerd, MN

Image

Brainerd was made famous when Baby Face Nelson robbed the First National Bank of Brainerd in October of 1933. But Brainerd is also known for the following:

• Brainerd claims Paul Bunyan as its native; the world's largest animated statue of him, once located at Paul Bunyan Amusement Center in nearby Baxter, was moved a few miles east of the town to This Old Farm after the amusement center closed in 2003.

• Much of the Coen brothers' movie Fargo takes place in a fictional version of Brainerd. The landmarks pictured (the Blue Ox Bar, the Paul Bunyan statue) are not the same ones actually in the town.


Brainerd Lakes seems to be a great vacation spot:

Pine Ridge Resort on Wise Lake:

Image

Image
This photograph was taken northwest of Brainerd, MN, at Cragun's Resort on Saturday evening, July 26, 2003. There was
an beautiful substorm from 11:20 to 11:40 p.m. Looking north-northwest. Taken without a tripod (the camera was sitting
on a picnic table). Photo by Lyndon Anderson, Bismarck, North Dakota, USA. http://www.prairiejournal.com



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The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 11:48 am 
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Great tidbit, Liz !!

While I've never been to Mall of America, I have some scrapbooking friends that say it a "Shoppers Paradise". I guess it would be with 520 stores !! :-O

Now as far as those temperatures, I'm here to tell you that our fellow Minnesotians can stop sending those frigid temps to Chicago any time now !!!! It is -11 F here in the Chicago suburbs this morning. "Brrrrrrr" doesn't even begin to convey how cold it is. (Hope Johnny isn't here yet -- it wouldn't be a memorable experience I can assure you.)

That bridge collapse last Summer was so tragic... I recall all the heartwenching photos on the local news. Very sad indeed.



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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 3:27 pm 
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I don't know what I expected the various homes/apartments/"lamsters hideouts" to look like, but they are so ordinary, so non-sinister. Such violent pasts leaving no trace.

Minneapolis would be a great place to live, if it didn't have the climate it does!


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 6:15 pm 
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fansmom wrote:
I don't know what I expected the various homes/apartments/"lamsters hideouts" to look like, but they are so ordinary, so non-sinister. Such violent pasts leaving no trace.

Minneapolis would be a great place to live, if it didn't have the climate it does!


Although born and raised a Northerner I have never been to many of those great lake states. No Chicago, St Paul or Minneapolis. When you all mentioned the temperatures you reminded me why. Looks like nice places to see but I'll stick with the photo tour.

Fansmom, You took the words out of my mouth about all the gangster hideouts. They look like homes of friends and neighbors. The little white house they rented for Ma Barker looks just like what it was, a nice house for a little old lady. It sort of points out just as the book did that they never really made it to the high flying lifestyle. Moving so often, changing vehicles, and keeping a low profile, was expensive.



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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 6:31 pm 
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Gemini, sometimes I wonder why I live here. The Winter's are so long and you would think after 46 years I would be used to it.... NOT !!!!! :-O

Guess that is what we refer to as "wicked cold".

I agree about the homes... quaint little bungalows in quiet neighborhoods, nothing like I would have imagined.



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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 6:38 pm 
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Thank you Liz. I got to drive through Minnisota, it is a very beautiful state in the summer. not sure I want to see it in the winter. :baby:



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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:11 pm 
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Raven wrote:
Thank you Liz. I got to drive through Minnisota, it is a very beautiful state in the summer. not sure I want to see it in the winter. :baby:


That's kind of what I was thinking, Raven. Minneapolis-St. Paul looks like a cool place, but just a little too cool, as it were, in the winter. I thought their hideouts looked like pretty normal abodes, too. Lucky 13, try to stay warm.



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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:26 pm 
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Woo Hoo! Got my bus pass and my Get Out Of Jail Free card and I'm ready to roll. I'm glad I can stay warm on this virtual tour! It is so cool that so many of these places are still around. I think Brainerd look like a pretty cool destination...in the summer!

Thanks, Liz. I know this was a huge amount of work!
:cool:



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Thanks, Liz. This is a great tour of the area, I'm glad I could take it while sitting next to our woodstove with the fire burning. It is interesting how "normal" the hideouts/residences of the famous gangsters were. This is an area of he country we've never visited but after this tidbit I would enjoy seeing the area in the summer.



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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 11:17 pm 
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Lucky13 wrote:
Gemini, sometimes I wonder why I live here. The Winter's are so long and you would think after 46 years I would be used to it.... NOT !!!!! :-O

Guess that is what we refer to as "wicked cold".

I agree about the homes... quaint little bungalows in quiet neighborhoods, nothing like I would have imagined.


It seems unanimous so far that we all sympathize with you on the cold but it is a beautiful place to look at.
I do remember that "wicked cold". I lived in northern Ohio until I was in my 20s but the memory of that cold has stayed with me all these years. We used to vacation in Canada and even though it was beautiful it was cold. The similiarlity of the cities and the scenery up North is why those photos and even the houses are like memories of my youth. It also may have been why our crime plagued friends found moving from city to city so easily.



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Taking a tour of this part of the country in the winter makes it feel not so cold here in CO! Thank you for that! :cool:
I can picture one of those vintage cars parked outside any of those buidlings and houses. Things haven't change much in the mighty Mid-West it seems....no wonder the location scouts are taking their time finding suitable sites for filming. They have a lot of cool spots to choose from.



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It's nice to see so many of the buildings are still there and haven't been lost to progress, for I think they are beautiful. Thanks for the information about the twin cities; they were nagging at me a bit when I read the book and this is very helpful. I love being ont he road too.



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Very interesting tidbit, Liz - thanks! I'm in the Twin Cities, and I learned things I never knew.

Here's a fun thing (well, at least it was for me!). I work on the west side of downtown St. Paul, just a couple blocks off Lexington Ave. Last week I googled the Lincoln Court Apartments, knowing they couldn't be too far away. (In fact, it was the day I had to take Public Enemies back to the library :sad: ) Turns out it's only 1.2 miles from my office. I've driven by it hundreds of times!

But that day, I pulled into the very narrow side street and then into the back alley, and sat there soaking up the history - my Dillinger moment. There was an Apartment for Rent sign in the front yard. Wonder if it's 303? :lol:

Hey, Lucky13 - you're in Minnesota, too?


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LiMoss wrote:
Very interesting tidbit, Liz - thanks! I'm in the Twin Cities, and I learned things I never knew.

Here's a fun thing (well, at least it was for me!). I work on the west side of downtown St. Paul, just a couple blocks off Lexington Ave. Last week I googled the Lincoln Court Apartments, knowing they couldn't be too far away. (In fact, it was the day I had to take Public Enemies back to the library :sad: ) Turns out it's only 1.2 miles from my office. I've driven by it hundreds of times!

But that day, I pulled into the very narrow side street and then into the back alley, and sat there soaking up the history - my Dillinger moment. There was an Apartment for Rent sign in the front yard. Wonder if it's 303? :lol:

Hey, Lucky13 - you're in Minnesota, too?


Oh LiMoss, that's just too exciting. Are you going to find out which apt. it is? I am such a sucker for this kind of thing. :disco:



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 3:52 pm 
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Location: Minnesota, USA
Liz wrote:
LiMoss wrote:
But that day, I pulled into the very narrow side street and then into the back alley, and sat there soaking up the history - my Dillinger moment. There was an Apartment for Rent sign in the front yard. Wonder if it's 303? :lol:


Oh LiMoss, that's just too exciting. Are you going to find out which apt. it is? I am such a sucker for this kind of thing. :disco:


No, I never did Liz – I should (I love this stuff, too)! I do have an ID on #303's location, though, through the book John Dillinger Slept Here. It circles the larger 3rd floor window on the right side of the setback part of the building as #303.

Did a little more cruising the other day and found that the Grand Avenue apt. building that Karpis and the Barkers lived in is only about four blocks from Dillinger's place.


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