TBIMG Question #26 ~ The Final Question

by Dr. Madhi Obeidi and Kurt Pitzer

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Liz
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TBIMG Question #26 ~ The Final Question

Unread postby Liz » Fri Aug 03, 2007 11:55 am

Well, it’s been fun, but we have to wrap this one up. :tear: Thanks to all of you who joined us. As usual, all of you have had great insights and have made me think in ways I wouldn’t have on my own. :cool: Hope to see you all for our next discussion. (see below)

So for our last question....


Are there any other comments you would like to make about TBIMG?



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You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Betty Sue
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Unread postby Betty Sue » Fri Aug 03, 2007 2:51 pm

Just want to say that I'm so glad you picked this book as it brought me enough into the world of Iraq that not only am I reading some news articles on Iraq now but even some on other countries that are very foreign to me.....still can't read much on the violence, but I'm starting to get educated. :baby: So thanks for that and, always, thanks for all your hard work and being so kind about answers! Much appreciated!! :bouquet:
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Unread postby nebraska » Fri Aug 03, 2007 3:10 pm

First, let me express my appreciation to our moderators and our members for conducting this discussion with intelligence and dignity. I know many of us have very strong feelings and opinions where Iraq and the Middle East are concerned and I am very proud of all of us for handling ourselves as we have. :bounce:

This is not a book I would have selected on my own. I read it and I studied the tidbits and I read all the discussion because I love ONBC and I know that I will grow from each selection that is made here. I don't know how much information I will retain, but I certainly learned a lot about many subjects.....centrifuges, Iraq history, Saddam's tyranny, the scientific community around the world and on and on. I think I also came to understand the Iraqi people a little more.......I tend to think either of guys in long white robes riding camels around the desert or guys in drab uniforms carrying weapons around the desert..... Dr. Obeidi was neither, and through him I saw something different from my stereotypes of the Arab world. Like many of you have mentioned, the recent celebration of the soccer championship touched me in a way I would never have felt before reading TBIMG. Knowing that Dr O is living anonymously in the States also gave me a different perspective on the people around me every day, I am suddenly more aware that everyone has a story and I cannot possibly know what I may learn from these people if I just take the time to listen.

I don't know if the whole story is factual or not. I will stay out of the war debate because I still don't understand it all enough to have a strong soapbox to stand on. But on a personal level, the book changed some of my more narrow thought patterns and opened some new ideas and gave me lots of things to think about. That seems to be one thing all the books here at ONBC have in common.

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Unread postby Liz » Fri Aug 03, 2007 5:55 pm

I agree with both of you. The book had the same effect on me, Nebraska, as it did on you. It broadened my narrow view and suspended some of my stereotypes and confirmed others. :eyebrow:

And I do so appreciate the respectful manner in which everyone discussed such a hot topic—more than you know. :yikes: I am sorry I didn’t mention that earlier.
:blush:
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The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Raven » Fri Aug 03, 2007 7:10 pm

Thank you Liz and DITHOT! Another great read and the tidbits were worthy of novels on their own.

I like reading anothers point of view and it certainly opened my eyes.

I am not surprised at the level of respect everyone had towards each other on this board. (Maybe I should be) ONBC is a great group of people and I expect nothing less of them.

Thanks again and see you during Wait Till Spring Bandini.
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Unread postby gemini » Fri Aug 03, 2007 10:35 pm

I agree with the previous comments that reading this book was a great learning experience not only about their culture but about many of the happenings our country was involved with that I didn't realize.

I never expected any controversy about the war because I have seen enough of how the Noodlemantras handled many touchy subjects with intelligence and grace. The subject matter was a little different than usual but I think Johnny is also expanding his interests as he sees more of the world and looks at how his children will grow up in it.

Thanks Liz and DITHOT, I can't wait for the next one.
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Unread postby Linda Lee » Fri Aug 03, 2007 10:39 pm

Thank you for choosing this book, I would not have read it on my own either. It was interesting to read it, and your questions and the responses made me think.

Thank you, Liz and Dithot, for all the time and effort you put into our ONBC discussions.
Serenity is not freedom from the storm but peace within the storm. ~ Unknown

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Unread postby Liz » Fri Aug 03, 2007 10:48 pm

I want to add that I’m glad we chose the book because it stretched me. However, I felt a bit out of my comfort zone with it. Sometimes it was hard for me to answer my own questions. :lol: Even at this ripe old age I'm still growing and learning.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Fri Aug 03, 2007 11:08 pm

Hey, all! I've been busy with family in town today and away from my computer. I have to say that both Liz and I thought this book would be quite a challenge but we knew you all would be up for it and we were right! I learn something new with every book and this one was certainly no exception. Thanks to everyone that hung in there with us! We are looking forward to welcoming everyone for our next discussion! :ONBC:
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Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby lizbet » Mon Aug 06, 2007 1:07 am

Eventhough I haven't been able to post anything (difficulty getting to my computer until just recently) I have been reading along - difficult subject to read about but none the less a very good read.

What a coincidence to finish up a book on nuclear weapons when August 6th is the 62nd anniversary of the dropping of the bomb on Hiroshima - there is no connection with ABIMG but I would like to let our Japanese zone friends know that however they spend today our thoughts and prayers are with them - :pray:
trying to live in "a profound state of ignorance"

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Unread postby Liz » Mon Aug 06, 2007 10:50 am

Thank you for that, Lizbet. My thoughts and prayers will be with them too.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Nickoftime » Mon Aug 06, 2007 1:02 pm

I have to say that I haven't picked up this book yet but after reading all of the questions and posts I definetely will. I loved reading the question of the day with a quote from the book and what everyone took from it. This is such an informative and diverse group and I saw so many different points of view that I would never have thought of if it hadn't been for the zone. Thank you ladies for letting those of us that haven't read the book yet, get a deeper understanding of what it is about. Wonderful book choice!!

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Tue Aug 07, 2007 8:07 am

Hi, Nickoftime and welcome to ONBC! :wave: I'm so glad to read that you enjoyed our discussion. We are definitely a diverse group and our discussions are always thought provoking. I hope you will join us for a book soon! :cool:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby San » Tue Aug 07, 2007 9:47 am

Thanks for an interesting discussion.
I enjoyed lurking very much.
I haven't read the book but thanks to all the great tidbits it was possible to understand the discussion of the book.
Art has to be forgotten: Beauty must be realised ~ ~ Piet Mondriaan (1872 -1944)

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Unread postby Liz » Tue Aug 07, 2007 1:37 pm

San and Nicoftime, glad you lurked. :cool: Hope you two can join us for a discussion soon.

I wanted to add one more thought to this discussion. It came out of Anita Thompson's mouth yesterday as she read from her book, The Gonzo Way (more on that in another thread later today). I thought what she said/wrote to be quite timely with our discussion of fear during the TBIMG discussion.

AT (from the book, pg. 98-99):


"He spent his life studying freedom, promotiong it, practicing it, and finally writing about it.....I think he learned that fear is the antifreedom--because as we gain freedom, which is the opposite of security, we also reap fear. And fear can drive us away from freedom, in a hurry. That , I believe, is why Hunter spent so much of his life fighting fear--and teaching others how to do the same: how to slay the dragon......Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is a 300-page argument for freedom in the face of fear. The list goes on, even to Hunter's memoir, Kingdom of Fear, a book that cannon be read without realizing that a nation governed by fear can never be truly free."
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.


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