Howl; Fifty Years Later

Moderator: Liz

Charlene
Posts: 1407
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 1:37 pm
Location: VA

Status: Offline

Howl; Fifty Years Later

Unread postby Charlene » Fri Mar 31, 2006 9:02 pm

Entertainment Weekly ~ April 7, 2006 ~ listed this new book on it's "The Must List"

I peeked in at Amazon.com and found this (released March 21, 2006)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0374173435/sr=8-1/qid=1143853145/ref=sr_1_1/104-6670085-0471965?%5Fencoding=UTF8

From Publishers Weekly
If the opening lines of Allen Ginsberg's "Howl" aren't seared into your brain, they will be by the end of this collection of 26 essays compiled by Shinder, a poet (Among Women) who learned much of his craft as Ginsberg's pupil. It's a shame the poem isn't included, though it feels as if it's quoted in its entirety at various points (the hardcover edition does come with a Ginsberg reading on CD). This collection juxtaposes reflections by writers such as Rick Moody and Andrei Codrescu about the impact of "Howl' on their lives; Billy Collins writes, "...it wasn't a waste of time for a Catholic high school boy from the suburbs to try to sound in his poems like a downtown homosexual Jewish beatnik." Robert Pinsky writes that he was initially elated by the poem's linguistic freedom even more than by its raw emotion. Though everybody gives the poem its due as an American classic, personal reactions dominate, and nearly everyone has a Ginsberg story to tell, even if it's just about being blown away by hearing him read. For those who have been moved by Ginsberg's words, this collection serves as a stirring confirmation. Photos. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review


"THE POEM THAT CHANGED AMERICA is alive on every page. Ginsberg's "Howl" calls out to who we are at any given moment: bold, driven, tormented; ecstatic, solitary or joined in ecstasy. Ginsberg wanted us respond in our own voices, and because each writer here does, this wonderful book is more than a tribute -- it's a collaboration with the poet himself." —Margo Jefferson, cultural critic

"An absolutely indispensable revelation of how the best minds of succeeding generations considered "Howl." Let's hope that this book too might change America." —Lawrence Ferlinghetti




User avatar
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
Posts: 10378
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Location: Austin

Status: Offline

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Fri Mar 31, 2006 10:17 pm

Thanks, Charlene! :cool: Here is a little more info from Barnes & Noble on who has written essays. I also read a review that says the original poem is included.

FROM THE PUBLISHER
A tribute to Ginsberg's signature work, which stirred a generation of angel-headed hipsters to cultural rebellion.

In 1956, City Lights, a small San Francisco bookstore, published Allen Ginsberg's Howl and Other Poems with its trademark black-and-white cover. The original edition cost seventy-five cents, but there was something priceless about its eponymous piece. Although it gave a voice to the new generation that came of age in the conservative years following World War II, the poem also conferred a strange, subversive power that continues to exert its influence to this day. Ginsberg went on to become one of the most eminent and celebrated writers of the second half of the twentieth century, and "Howl" became the critical axis of the worldwide literary, cultural, and political movement that would be known as the Beat generation.

The year 2006 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of "Howl," and The Poem That Changed America will celebrate and shed new light on this profound cultural work. With new essays by many of today's most distinguished writers, including Frank Bidart, Andrei Codrescu, Vivian Gornick, Phillip Lopate, Daphne Merkin, Rick Moody, Robert Pinsky, and Luc Sante, The Poem That Changed America reveals the pioneering influence of "Howl" down through the decades and its powerful resonance today.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!

User avatar
Liz
ONBC Moderator
Posts: 12930
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 2:13 pm
Location: The Left Coast

Status: Offline

Unread postby Liz » Sat Apr 01, 2006 11:45 am

This sounds like a must read for anyone interested in Ginsberg and the Beats. :cool: I'm putting it on my list. Thanks Charlene.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

User avatar
Endora
Posts: 15670
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 5:03 pm
Location: Darkest UK~ Down in Albion

Status: Offline

Unread postby Endora » Sat Apr 01, 2006 12:01 pm

Cartainly sounds an interesting read. I found Howl very difficult, and so haven't re-read it in years. I think you have to know more than I do about American heritage and the American mind. Maybe I should try.
Work hard, learn well, and make peace with the fact that you'll never be as cool as Johnny Depp. GQ.

Solace in the flood

User avatar
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
Posts: 10378
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Location: Austin

Status: Offline

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sat Apr 01, 2006 8:03 pm

I think that helps, Endora. I found it easier to relate to than some other reads for that reason.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

User avatar
cait
Posts: 7521
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 5:40 pm
Location: NB, Canada

Status: Offline

Unread postby cait » Sat Apr 01, 2006 8:37 pm

I just read the book Whale Music by Paul Quarrington for my English Lit class. There were a few indirect and direct connections to Ginsberg and "Howl" throughout the book. It was a quirky and fun read. :cool:
Dirt...this is a jar of dirt.

User avatar
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
Posts: 10378
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Location: Austin

Status: Offline

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Apr 02, 2006 12:03 pm

I haven't read Whale Music, cait, but I like quirky reads! :cool:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

User avatar
cait
Posts: 7521
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 5:40 pm
Location: NB, Canada

Status: Offline

Unread postby cait » Sun Apr 02, 2006 12:49 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:I haven't read Whale Music, cait, but I like quirky reads! :cool:


:lol: I do too. I just finished writing a paper on the book a couple days ago.
Dirt...this is a jar of dirt.

User avatar
gilly
Posts: 6552
Joined: Tue Mar 08, 2005 10:14 pm
Location: australia

Status: Offline

Unread postby gilly » Tue Apr 04, 2006 7:17 am

I must admit to finding it hard too, Endora..even tried reading it out loud,but I couldn't grasp it. :-O ..Maybe reading the esays will help :cool:
Life is beautiful.

I have faith in you.

User avatar
Boo-Radley
Posts: 5358
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 11:53 am
Location: Missouri, USA

Status: Offline

Unread postby Boo-Radley » Wed Apr 12, 2006 5:04 pm

Thank you Charlene, one more for the list. :writer2: :reader:

Live in Depp
Boo
"With this hand I will cup your.... Oh goodness no!"~~Victor Van Dort

"The theater is my drug, and my illness is so far advanced that my physic must be of the highest quality."~~John Wilmot


Return to “Kerouac and The Beats”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests