Monday Night Thread ~ Talking with Authors

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es
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Unread postby es » Tue Mar 21, 2006 4:30 pm

sorrry to be late.RR has sent me.

nice to read your choices,and nice to look up autheurs I dont know.

For me I think I would like to talk with ms Jean M Auel,especially her ideas about the last book wich I really looked forward to but for me was such a dissapointment while the others were beautiful and for me soo hard to put down.

also a dutch writer who unfortuanutley has died,Thea Beckman,she was the autheur that kept me reading in my teens.

greets,
es
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Unread postby DisIllusionAngel » Tue Mar 21, 2006 4:48 pm

SweetSam wrote:

I have not heard of Michael Ondaatje. What did he write?


Yes, The English Patient! In case you didn't see the film, the book is a group of intricately woven threads that come together to form the lives of several characters who are all enmeshed during WWII. It is a tale of adventure, love and loss during wartime and the beauty of the story lies not just in the exciting narrative, or the multi-dimensional characters, but in the beauty of the way the story is told --it is like a mosaic of sights, sounds, and smells that slowly unfolds itself until your senses are heightened and you feel an overwhelming sense of oneness and appreciation for life itself. It is a song about life.

(I got carried away again...):)

He also wrote In the Skin of the Lion, and [/i]Anil's Ghost, along with tons of poetry. Some I have looked at are from [i]The Cinnamon Peeler.

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Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Tue Mar 21, 2006 6:12 pm

es wrote:sorrry to be late.RR has sent me.

nice to read your choices,and nice to look up autheurs I dont know.

For me I think I would like to talk with ms Jean M Auel,especially her ideas about the last book wich I really looked forward to but for me was such a dissapointment while the others were beautiful and for me soo hard to put down.

also a dutch writer who unfortuanutley has died,Thea Beckman,she was the autheur that kept me reading in my teens.

greets,
es


Me too I had enjoyed the other books by Jean M Auel but she seemed to loose her way with the last one and it has put me off bothering with anymore she might write.
Es if you like that sort of book you should try Raindeer Moon, I can't recall off hand who the author is, but it is also based in prehistoric times.

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Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Tue Mar 21, 2006 6:14 pm

DisIllusionAngel wrote:SweetSam wrote:

I have not heard of Michael Ondaatje. What did he write?


Yes, The English Patient! In case you didn't see the film, the book is a group of intricately woven threads that come together to form the lives of several characters who are all enmeshed during WWII. It is a tale of adventure, love and loss during wartime and the beauty of the story lies not just in the exciting narrative, or the multi-dimensional characters, but in the beauty of the way the story is told --it is like a mosaic of sights, sounds, and smells that slowly unfolds itself until your senses are heightened and you feel an overwhelming sense of oneness and appreciation for life itself. It is a song about life.

(I got carried away again...):)

He also wrote In the Skin of the Lion, and [/i]Anil's Ghost, along with tons of poetry. Some I have looked at are from [i]The Cinnamon Peeler.


the English Patient one of my favorite films, but I have not read the book as I know it is quite different. I have read Anil's Ghost though, that was very good.

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Tue Mar 21, 2006 7:15 pm

I am finally catching up today. After reading all your wonderful suggestions I am going to need an entire room just devoted to books and possibly another lifetime to get them all read. Thank you everyone for pointing out some really new (to me) and interesting authors as well as reminding me of old favorites. Keep 'em coming!
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Unread postby rustyred » Wed Mar 22, 2006 1:20 am

es wrote:sorrry to be late.RR has sent me.

nice to read your choices,and nice to look up autheurs I dont know.

For me I think I would like to talk with ms Jean M Auel,especially her ideas about the last book wich I really looked forward to but for me was such a dissapointment while the others were beautiful and for me soo hard to put down.

also a dutch writer who unfortuanutley has died,Thea Beckman,she was the autheur that kept me reading in my teens.

greets,
es


Oh es - I too very much enjoyed Jean Auel. Her last book was such a disappointment also for me.
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Unread postby lumineuse » Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:29 pm

Endora wrote:
Liz wrote:
lumineuse wrote:
Liz wrote:
lumineuse wrote:I just finished reading "The Narnian", a book which was not so much a biography as a chronology of a man's changing beliefs over time and the effect that had upon his writing. A person who did not want to become a Christian, but did, despite himself, become a reknowned "apologist", and the effect that apologetics had upon his beliefs. A person who gave me the gift of "Narnia", which I have had for at least 40 years, and I see my nieces and nephews having for years beyond me. Yes, I wish I could talk to him.


Are you talking about C.S. Lewis?


Yes


One of the most helpful books I ever read was Mere Christianity, by C.S Lewis. I think it is because he had been so resistant.


Lumi, perhaps you could try Out of the Silent Planet, Voyage to Venus, and This Hideous Strength, more CSL on a similar topic. I preferred them to Narnia.


Late coming back to this topic! After having read The Narnian, I am interested in those other works. A suggestion where to start, Endora?
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Unread postby lumineuse » Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:36 pm

Mark Twain - wow, would THAT be an interesting guy to talk to!

I think I'd rather talk to A.A. Milne than Beatrix Potter, but that's just my childhood preferences coming out. I thought the original Pooh books were brilliant and hilarious. Too bad Disney trivialized them for generations.

I'd love to hear a deabte between C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien - I think they had an interesting relationship that was divisive due to differences in personal philosophy. It would be fascinating to hear them air it, the way they did when they were alive.

Poe - I don't know. It would be intriguing, but separating the psychological/psychiatric baggage from the talent would be a challenge.
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Wed Mar 22, 2006 11:08 pm

lumi, thank you for metioning Milne. He is my childhood favorite as well. :cool:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby lizbet » Thu Mar 23, 2006 1:14 am

lumineuse wrote:I'd love to hear a deabte between C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien - I think they had an interesting relationship that was divisive due to differences in personal philosophy. It would be fascinating to hear them air it, the way they did when they were alive.


I find these two men fascinating as well: two extremely intelligent men, one teaching language the other romance literature, both wrote fantasy, both were extremely devoted Christians, one wrote for the masses while the other wrote for himself, one let his writing inform others of his faith while the other let his faith inform his writing (I think this maybe were some of the "divisiveness" lumineuse refers to comes into play) and both were extremely private men Tolkien more so than Lewis.

As much as I admire both authors and love their writings I'd rather have seperate ongoing correspondances (snail mail) with each man rather than have them both in one room together.

Now if JK Rowling were finished book seven and free for tea one afternoon I'd love to talk with her about the influence she has already indicated these two authors have had on her and her passion for children & literacy.

Good taste in authors luminuese :cool:
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Unread postby es » Fri Mar 24, 2006 4:54 am

Gilbertsgirl wrote
es


Me too I had enjoyed the other books by Jean M Auel but she seemed to loose her way with the last one and it has put me off bothering with anymore she might write.
Es if you like that sort of book you should try Raindeer Moon, I can't recall off hand who the author is, but it is also based in prehistoric times.


GG,I looked it up for the autheur,;E Marshall Thomas,when I go to the library I will look for it,thanks,
greets,
es
who laughs the last didnt got the joke,

freek&sjaak

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Unread postby fansmom » Sat Mar 25, 2006 11:37 pm

gilly wrote:I read 'A Portrait of an Artist 'at University and I just couldn't get my head around it..Joyce was called arrogant by more than one person who met him and apparently regarded himself as the best writer to have come out of Ireland...So I probably would have ended up bopping him,if I'd met him.. :capnjack:
Pitiful that I'm just getting to Monday's thread on Saturday evening, isn't it? But anyway, my daughter just read "Portrait" for school and although I haven't read it, it seems to have some superficial similarities to TGM--namely Ireland as a setting and a main character with the initials SD. (And I might bop both those authors, given a chance.)

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Unread postby DisIllusionAngel » Sun Mar 26, 2006 12:33 am

Gilbert's Girl wrote:

the English Patient one of my favorite films, but I have not read the book as I know it is quite different. I have read Anil's Ghost though, that was very good.


GG I realized I meant to ask you what you thought of Anil's Ghost? (before this thread disappeared and is suddenly appeared again)

Also (sort of off topic)...anyone have any especially controversial favorites to recommend? (besides already mentioned Earl of Rochester reads)

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Unread postby DisIllusionAngel » Sun Mar 26, 2006 1:09 am

fansmom wrote:

Pitiful that I'm just getting to Monday's thread on Saturday evening, isn't it? But anyway, my daughter just read "Portrait" for school and although I haven't read it, it seems to have some superficial similarities to TGM--namely Ireland as a setting and a main character with the initials SD. (And I might bop both those authors, given a chance.)


I read "Portrait" recently and not sure I understood any more than when I had begun it... though Joyce does have some of the most melodiously embroidered passages I've ever read. :perplexed:

I think 1)either I re-read it, or 2) there's going to be some heavy auteur bopping going on. ;-)

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Unread postby suec » Sun Mar 26, 2006 6:15 am

The person I would most like to talk to right now is J.P. Donleavy. This is because I had the immense privilege of meeting him recently on one of those ONBC jaunts that I go on from time to time. But looking back on it, I do feel so frustrated, because of all those questions that I should have asked at the time, and didn't. :blush: So, I sure would like another go. But that is greedy of couse.
I have promised Liz and DIDHOT that I will write it up. But this does seem an appropriate place to share a couple of things about Mr Donleavy and James Joyce, because he did have a couple of things to say about that. One was that he had been accused of being like James Joyce and that he had had to go the library and look him up because he didn't know anything about him at the time. The other was that Joyce tried to make his work as difficult as possible, whereas he tried to make his writing as simple as possible.
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