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I, Fatty Question #10 - You Be the Critic

by Jerry Stahl

Moderator: Liz

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dharma_bum
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Unread postby dharma_bum » Fri Jul 15, 2005 12:02 am

suec wrote:I do feel that the first person narrative gave an illusion of veracity that was totally unjustified.


Suec I agree, but the first person narrative was the one device that kept the book interesting, as long as I could tell myself it was fiction. I found all of Stahl's other devices a little too transparent. Most of the women were versions of Roscoe’s mother and most of men, versions of his father. And, of course Roscoe strives his whole career to for the love approval of the one person incapable of giving it… a bit simplistic for my taste.

I don’t know if anyone has talked about Stahl’s own memoir, Permanent Midnight, but in it he recounts being a successful television writer while in the throws of heroin addiction. He portrays everyone that was a part of the Hollywood machine as horribly callous—even after they discovered his secret they didn’t help because they didn’t want to get in the way of a runaway hit. No surprise, the train eventually wrecked at great personal cost. I think he tried to weave some of these personal experiences in I Fatty, but the fit wasn’t quite as accommodating.

The tales of early Hollywood were quite fun to read.
"You can't broom out your head. You certainly can't broom out your heart. And there's a hot wire between them, and everything shows in the eyes."
—Johnny Depp

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Raven
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Unread postby Raven » Fri Jul 15, 2005 1:14 am

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:I have to say I mostly did enjoy it (sorry Raven and neophyte :blush: ). Having said that, I liked it as a novel, as long as I remembered that it was not his true story. Parts of it had me laughing out loud but then I like wry humor. I enjoyed the first person perspective, thought it added to the story. I am also a lover of historical fiction and history in general so I especially liked learning more about the early years of Hollywood and the people that started it all while I was doing the research. The book made me sympathize with Roscoe even before I knew the real story.


Hey DITHOT!

never apoligize for likeing a book! everyone is so different and everyone has their likes and dislikes. This book did not do anything for me. But you saw lots of things in it that I never even noticed. Sometimes I think that when I am reading a book I have to be in the right frame of mind so to speak. And the then the book with actually speak back to me. Maybe I should read it again sometime in the future. summer has been busy here.

thanks again to you and Liz for all your hard work.

Raven
"In my experience, those who do not like you fall into two categories: the stupid
and the envious."
John Wilmot, the 2nd Earl of Rochester in The Libertine by Stephen Jeffreys

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Raven
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Unread postby Raven » Fri Jul 15, 2005 1:15 am

sorry I posted twice! time for bed!
"In my experience, those who do not like you fall into two categories: the stupid

and the envious."

John Wilmot, the 2nd Earl of Rochester in The Libertine by Stephen Jeffreys

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Liz
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Unread postby Liz » Fri Jul 15, 2005 2:01 am

Raven wrote:
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:I have to say I mostly did enjoy it (sorry Raven and neophyte :blush: ). Having said that, I liked it as a novel, as long as I remembered that it was not his true story. Parts of it had me laughing out loud but then I like wry humor. I enjoyed the first person perspective, thought it added to the story. I am also a lover of historical fiction and history in general so I especially liked learning more about the early years of Hollywood and the people that started it all while I was doing the research. The book made me sympathize with Roscoe even before I knew the real story.


Hey DITHOT!

never apoligize for likeing a book! everyone is so different and everyone has their likes and dislikes. This book did not do anything for me. But you saw lots of things in it that I never even noticed. Sometimes I think that when I am reading a book I have to be in the right frame of mind so to speak. And the then the book with actually speak back to me. Maybe I should read it again sometime in the future. summer has been busy here.

thanks again to you and Liz for all your hard work.

Raven


This may seem weird on my part, but I'm kind of excited about the fact that we seem to be split as a group on whether we like the book or not. I don't think we've been this split since "On The Road". :eyebrow: Sometimes I think it makes the discussion more interesting when we disagree. I know in my hometown book club that if we all like the book, we don't have a whole lot to say. That makes for a very boring meeting. :-/
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:36 am

I agree Liz, it makes for more interesting discussion. Afterall, there are no right or wrong answers!

Raven, I think different books speak to people in individual ways. I have definitely liked some of our ONBC books less or more than others.

dharma_bum, I have not read Permanent Midnight but I did watch the movie version. I agree that I could see some of Stahl in the character of Roscoe. That is probably unfortunate really, since it makes Roscoe into something he really wasn't, a heroin addict.

See you all later. I have a date with bix and Willy! :popcorn: :wonka: :giddy:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!


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