CATCF Question #8 - Your Favorite Thing

by Roald Dahl

Moderator: Liz

User avatar
Liz
ONBC Moderator
Posts: 12971
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 2:13 pm
Location: The Left Coast

Status: Offline

CATCF Question #8 - Your Favorite Thing

Unread postby Liz » Wed Mar 09, 2005 4:43 am

What was your favorite aspect of the story (i.e. the plot)? The sky’s the limit here……
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

User avatar
gilly
Posts: 6552
Joined: Tue Mar 08, 2005 10:14 pm
Location: australia

Status: Offline

Question 8 Your Favourite Thing

Unread postby gilly » Wed Mar 09, 2005 7:57 am

I'll jump in here Liz ands say that my favourite thing was the fact it wasn't a cutesy story,that it showed the murkier side of character,combined with the idea of a tour through a chocolate factory.Who wouldn't want a glimpse of that-but it's not a chocolate factory that we could predict.I re-read this book through my Autistic son's eyes, and he loved the idea of parents being dominated by their kids,although sharing their fate ultimately and he really tuned into the idea of a child who is superior to everyone[almost],like Madeleine and who's transcendant qualities are eventually recognised and validated.

User avatar
es
Posts: 9964
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 2:56 pm
Location: den helder,aan zee

Status: Offline

Unread postby es » Wed Mar 09, 2005 8:52 am

well, i am loving the obvious,bad kids get their suited punishment,good kids are rewarded.
in visualisation i always wanted to see the chocaletcastlle wich mr wonka made for a prins.
greets,
es

User avatar
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
Posts: 10378
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Location: Austin

Status: Offline

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Wed Mar 09, 2005 9:34 am

gilly wrote: I'll jump in here Liz ands say that my favourite thing was the fact it wasn't a cutesy story,that it showed the murkier side of character,combined with the idea of a tour through a chocolate factory.


Welcome, gilly! :wave: Good to have you here! I like children's authors that don't talk down to kids. Dahl does that but still mangages to capture the reader's imagination in a grand way. I think that is my favorite part of the story, the richness of the imagination and all the fantastic inventions.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!

User avatar
KYwoman
Posts: 5958
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 7:26 pm
Location: Kentucky (KY); birthplace of Johnny Depp and Hunter S Thompson

Status: Offline

Unread postby KYwoman » Wed Mar 09, 2005 9:53 am

Agreed. I guess I'm like Tim Burton and like darker stories. I don't tend to like (excuse the pun) sugar-coated versions of things. Fairy tales are fine, but stories with some depth and shadows make them interesting. (Well, I guess even Fairy Tales can have some grusome parts!)

Also, HOW can anyone possibly not like a story with CHOCOLATE as one of the main characters?!! :cool:
"Buy the ticket, take the ride." :motorcycle:

User avatar
lumineuse
Posts: 5991
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 10:50 am
Location: Erie, PA, USA

Status: Offline

Unread postby lumineuse » Wed Mar 09, 2005 10:40 am

I just love the sheer eye-candy fantasy of it. Burton's version is goiung to be a major treat for me in that regard.
"Oh, good!........ No worries, then."

User avatar
Bohemian
Posts: 516
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2004 6:55 pm
Location: Following my inner compass

Status: Offline

Unread postby Bohemian » Wed Mar 09, 2005 11:01 am

lumineuse wrote:I just love the sheer eye-candy fantasy of it. Burton's version is goiung to be a major treat for me in that regard.


This is a major draw for me, too. Visually, whether on screen or in the mind's eye, this story is a feast.

Some of my favorite images are the elevator with all the buttons, the squirrel room and the square candies that look round (cracks me up every time). Since the last two were omitted from the first film, I really look forward to seeing Tim's take on these scenes.
"I feel sullied and unusual..."

"What do I want for the future? I know exactly what I want, everything: calm, peace, tranquillity, freedom, fun, happiness. If I could make all that one word, I would - a many-syllabled word."

User avatar
Liz
ONBC Moderator
Posts: 12971
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 2:13 pm
Location: The Left Coast

Status: Offline

Unread postby Liz » Wed Mar 09, 2005 1:20 pm

KYwoman wrote:Agreed. I guess I'm like Tim Burton and like darker stories. I don't tend to like (excuse the pun) sugar-coated versions of things. Fairy tales are fine, but stories with some depth and shadows make them interesting. (Well, I guess even Fairy Tales can have some grusome parts!)


I tend to like darker stories too. Little House on the Prairie type stories don't cut it for me. But that's not my favorite aspect of this book.

It's hard for me to pick just one thing. I think I enjoyed the story so much because I really had no idea what to expect. I had never read the book when I was younger, nor had I seen the movie. So I was tickled by every outrageous thing that happened, wondering what would happen next. Plus, I could envision Johnny as Willy--which always helps. :grin:

But I think my favorite aspect of the story was the chanting of the Oompa Loompas. I love rhymes. I enjoy reading them out loud and appreciate their cleverness. In this case they were clever and had a message.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

User avatar
Gypsylee
Posts: 735
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 5:47 pm
Location: Southern California

Status: Offline

Unread postby Gypsylee » Wed Mar 09, 2005 2:40 pm

Hi all!

I liked how Grandpa and Charlie were so amazed at everything they saw. I liked how Charlie clung to his Grandpa and the two became ageless........both very excited with each new adventure. I also like how respectful they were of Mr. Wonka even on some of the craziest parts of the tour. They never yelled at him or disobeyed him because they appreciated the fact that that was HIS factory and they were his guests. I can't handle snotty disrespectful people who act "better than thou" and there was definitely a lot of that in this story. Loved the squirrels too!
"In the time of your life, live....so that in that wondrous time you shall not add to the misery and sorrow of the world, but shall smile to the infinite delight and mystery of it." Saroyan

User avatar
axelsgirl
Posts: 380
Joined: Sat Oct 16, 2004 3:54 am
Location: Oregon

Status: Offline

Unread postby axelsgirl » Wed Mar 09, 2005 3:42 pm

First of all I loved the squirrels, I can't wait to see that in the movie. Who would of thought they could teach so many squirrels to sit still and do what they were trained to do.
:eyebrow: This just cracks me up! Squirrel wranglers!
I also love the fact that Charlie was rewarded for his good behavior and that Wonka didn't tolerate the other childrens bad behavior. He just quickly sent them on their way and gave his attention to the ones that were left. So often when I work in elementary and middle schools the unruly kids seem to get all the time and attention and the kids that are behaving themselves have to suffer by having their class time taken away . In one school if a student is out of control, they remove all the rest of the kids from that classroom and they lose all that class time. They can't go back until the problem child is dealt with. So I think in that way Mr. Wonka was fair and a good example to parents and kids. :cool:
"Yeah, well, let's keep on truckin'!"

deppraved
Posts: 5002
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 9:24 pm

Status: Offline

Unread postby deppraved » Wed Mar 09, 2005 4:05 pm

There's a lot to like, but I think the part that touched me the most was when Charlie found the dollar and spent it the second candy bar and found the ticket, and the way the shopkeeper was genuinely happy for Charlie and protected him against the vultures who were trying to bilk him out of his ticket. And I really loved Grandpa Joe. And the way Willie Wonka was always asserting his authority! So masterful! :sigh:

lizbet
Posts: 679
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 8:27 pm
Location: London, Canada

Status: Offline

Unread postby lizbet » Wed Mar 09, 2005 6:55 pm

Gypsylee wrote: I liked how Grandpa and Charlie were so amazed at everything they saw. I liked how Charlie clung to his Grandpa and the two became ageless........both very excited with each new adventure.


This was the first time I read CATCF (can't imagine how I missed it as a kid - missed the first movie also?!?) so just about everything caught my attention but from the beginning, the relationship between Charlie and Grandpa Joe stood out. It was really sweet how Charlie's parents gave up their opportunities to go with Charlie to the chocolate factory to Grandpa Joe and I really loved their reactions all the way through the tour - they really were like 'two kids in a candy shop'!!! (sorry, I couldn't resist!). :disco: :bounce:
trying to live in "a profound state of ignorance"

User avatar
Liz
ONBC Moderator
Posts: 12971
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 2:13 pm
Location: The Left Coast

Status: Offline

Unread postby Liz » Wed Mar 09, 2005 7:39 pm

lizbet wrote:It was really sweet how Charlie's parents gave up their opportunities to go with Charlie to the chocolate factory to Grandpa Joe and I really loved their reactions all the way through the tour - they really were like 'two kids in a candy shop'!!! (sorry, I couldn't resist!). :disco: :bounce:


:thumbsup: :lol: Good one, Lizbet!
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

lizbet
Posts: 679
Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 8:27 pm
Location: London, Canada

Status: Offline

Unread postby lizbet » Wed Mar 09, 2005 8:24 pm

guess the longer you are away from ONBC the punnier you get?! looks like I have a lot of reading to do to get caught up (I had to shut down while going from my old machine to a wonderful new one) :eyebrow:
trying to live in "a profound state of ignorance"

User avatar
Caitlin
Posts: 213
Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2004 3:59 pm
Location: AZ

Status: Offline

Unread postby Caitlin » Wed Mar 09, 2005 8:46 pm

Well, when I read this at a younger age, I always loved the part when Violet chews the gum and swells into a blueberry. I saw a cute play of this at a local theater when I was about 7 and I thought that seeing her blow up into a blueberry was the funniest thing I'd ever seen. I guess it's the little things that catch the attention of kids.
Now that I'm reading it as a teenager, I guess I just like the silly things that I never noticed before, such as the different rooms of outrageous chocolate and candy inventions. The deeper meaning that is attached as well is enthralling. I'd never think to look at a children's story in order to learn something about society, life, anthing really! (Although, just read through Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass and you will learn sooo much!) It's just refreshing to read a story that doesn't sugar-coat everything and leaves you thinking about things.
"Do you like avocados?" -Sam
"Life would be a whole lot more interesting with a bunch of Willy Wonkas running around."


Return to “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests