It is currently Tue Oct 21, 2014 3:02 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




 Page 1 of 1 [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: The Beat Goes On with Jack Kerouac
PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2005 3:54 am 
JDZ Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 2:13 pm
Posts: 12488
Location: The Left Coast
Much thanks to DeepinDepp for passing along this interesting interview regarding Jack Kerouac.

From: http://www2.townonline.com/westford/art ... eid=176978

Q & A: The Beats go on with Jack Kerouac
Thursday, February 3, 2005

(Editor's note: The following is an edited transcript of an interview with Westford novelist David Daniel on Jack Keruoac. Peter Costa is a senior editor with the Community Newspaper Company and editor of the Westford Eagle.)

Q: What is your title and role at UMass Lowell?

A: Unfortunately, it's a former title because it only lasted for one year, last year. Now I still teach part-time so I am on the adjunct faculty. But the title was: The Jack Kerouac Visiting Writer in Residence. So that was nice.

Q: Did you in that role do deconstruction of Kerouac's texts or did you try to get others to write like him?

A: Maybe drink like him. Not really (laugh). Basically, I taught a fiction writing course and gave a couple of readings. Beyond that, talking with John Sampas, who is the executor of the Jack Kerouac estate, he was impressed with the fact that I had read Kerouac and knew Kerouac. Apparently other people who have held that post, it's not a given that they know anything or have any connection to Kerouac but there's no formal duty in terms of having to interpret his texts or even teach his text.

Q: How did you get to read the early Kerouac when you were younger?

A: I first read "On the Road" when I was at basic training. Actually I read about half of it and then basic training ended and I just had too much stuff to carry so I left it behind for the next poor GI that was going to be in the barracks. I read it not until I was in my early- or mid-20s and then I liked it. I read that, I read "Dharma Bums." I read "The Town and the City," which is the first of his books and in some ways, the most conventional. Since then I have not read everything by any means. Some of it's very difficult to read, it's so experimental and so non-linear. But the best of it's good.

Q: What do you mean by experimental and non-linear?

A: He had a real belief, or a series of beliefs, in spontaneous poetics. He was a believer in first draft only. Don't mess with what the hand of God puts down on the page. He believed in divine inspiration in a way. He was a lightning-fast typist and he would write things in stream of consciousness prose. The original manuscript, the scroll manuscript of "On the Road," is 120 feet long teletype paper and it is completely unpunctuated. One long rant, no paragraphs, or anything. That of course was edited and reworked because it turns into a pretty good book.

But a lot of his stuff, "Visions of Cody," "Visions of Gerard," some of those. He's brilliant in what he's attempting to do but I almost have the feeling that I respect him in the way I really respect Charlie Parker as a saxophonist or Jackson Pollock as a painter. I'm not crazy about looking at two dozen Jackson Pollock paintings. I see two or three, that's enough. I don't like to listen to Charlie Parker much because he's hard on the ears. I'd rather listen to John Coltrane or to somebody who's smoother, more melodic. And Kerouac can be a bit that way as a writer. He doesn't have a smooth flowing well-structured narrative. He's got something that's very different. Now the good books, the ones that I've enjoyed, "On the Road," "The Dharma Bums," they are somewhat more conventional. But with each subsequent book I think he grew farther and farther away from that and some people claim that those other books are brilliant and I don't argue that. I have a great deal of fondness and respect for him but that doesn't mean that I like all of his stuff equally.

Q: He foreshadowed a whole decade of the 1960s of psychedelic thinking and his prose was spontaneous as you say, although John Dos Passos also wrote stream-of-consciousness. Tell me about how he forecast the hippie phenomenon out in Haight Ashbury.

A: He did. He was big into denial of that later on while people like Alan Ginsburg very naturally fell into that. Ginsburg would be at every peace rally advocating for smoking marijuana and love and peace and at the sit-ins, whereas Kerouac was completely absent from the scene then. I think by that point he'd already begun his alcoholic degeneration. His really brilliant work I think was done back in the early 1950s through the early 1960s. But he did forecast the notion of few attachments, of working occasionally and sporadically but being much more interested in going out and traveling and experiencing life and not having a lot of material connections. I think it was Timothy Leary's mantra about "tune in, turn on , drop out." I don't know the sequence but something like that. That really is in effect what Kerouac was doing. He was tuned in. He was smoking marijuana, using Benzedrine, taking drugs. They were very much into all-night rap sessions. A regular life pattern, punching a time clock, which a lot of his fellow American citizens circa 1955 were doing, they weren't. He would get sporadic checks. His mother helped him out. He'd get some GI checks. There was very much a kind of template being established, either consciously or unconsciously, that later people, a half-generation later, picked up on and actively did. San Francisco is very big in Kerouac's work, as is New York, as is Lowell. San Francisco was obviously a mecca for what became a counter-culture movement.

Q: Did people take him more seriously because he came from Lowell, from parents who punched time clocks, as you say, and was a rebel with a cause?

A: I do think he had a real identification with the blue collar, working person but I do think he also saw his father work his whole life away, his mother continuing to work in the factories in Lowell even into her old age. Part of him always felt bad about that and yet I didn't see him in any hurry to go out and get a job himself to help give them checks to support them. He did have a rebellious spirit and I think once he hooked up with some of those other minds like Lucien Carr, William Burroughs and some of these people that came from very different backgrounds than he did, [educated and privileged] and he liked them and they liked him. I think they saw in Jack something that they liked. Clearly he was a ruggedly built guy, an athlete on a football scholarship to Columbia. But he was much more interested in playing football than being in the Columbia University Library and reading Proust and Thomas Wolfe.

Q: What happened? He had some falling out with a coach or something and then actually ended up not playing football?

A: He was recruited by Lou Little, the coach down there. In his first game as a JV, he ran like a 90-yard kickoff return for a touchdown but also got a hairline fracture on his leg and told the coach that he was injured.The coach thought that he was just malingering and played him anyway. Kerouac got embittered as sometimes people do and stopped showing up for practice and quit. I don't think he played beyond that first year and then dropped out.

Q: That was a pretty formative period for him that introduced him to society and high-minded intellectuals, people like Burroughs and Lucien Carr who could do anything they wanted to do and they decided to become Beats.

A: And Ginsburg was a classmate too. A very young Alan Ginsburg at Columbia. So New York really, that first novel of his, The City and the Town, was about Lowell, he calls it Galloway, and it's about New York City. It is that journey from small town (city) to big city and jazz and Times Square and these friends and musicians, marijuana.

Q: He was really writing about what he knew?

A: All of his work comes directly out of personal experience. The one novel that doesn't is not a very good novel, a delayed novel called "Pick."

Q: This one that you brought in today. It's a relatively unknown one. What is it?

A: This is a novel that he wrote when he was a student. The flap will tell you exactly what it is.

Q: I like that famous quote that Truman Capote said about him. "Jack that's not writing that's typewriting." Which book was that about?

A: It's come off over time as being this snippy little attack but actually Truman liked Jack Kerouac and respected him and admired him. In a way he was quipping about Jack's ability to type really fast and just kind of let the words flow.

Q: Do you think Kerouac was so popular as the rebel with the beat generation, the way some of our video stars are today, the Madonnas and the Sean Penns of the film world because then the reading public had heroes like Hemingway? Did that kind of literary celebrity-hood affect his life and his work more than it would today?

A: In many ways it affected it to the ill rather than to the good in that James Dean comes to mind - a young Marlon Brando with the image of a rebel and Kerouac was seen as that. A touseled-haired, unshaven, slightly barbaric guy writing in this prose that just didn't fit what had been done before. And coupled with the fact that he was very handsome and his early photographs show that, but by all accounts, he was sort of a shy introverted guy who found alcohol was sort of the thing that let the demon out of the bottle and he could interact with people. He was a hard-working guy who wrote a bunch of novels, and was having no luck with them. Between his first novel, "The Town and the City," and "On the Road," there was a seven-year span during which he was writing the whole time, but unpublished. Nobody would buy anything. Then "On the Road" became an overnight sensation. There was a famous review, Gilbert Milstein was the reviewer in the New York Times. He just said this is the book that speaks for a generation the way Hemingway's, "The Sun Also Rises" speaks for his generation. And the next day, Kerouac wakes up, reads the review and the phone's ringing off the hook and he's suddenly famous. And I think he felt compelled to live the image that people were projecting on him as this free-wheeling "On the Road" type, marijuana-smoking, sleeping around, hitch-hiking guy and that really wasn't an accurate image in some ways. He could also be a guy that was very dedicated even to sit down and write a million unpublished words , as he said, before he was able to get into print. You have to sit there a long time. I think his ability to feed into a need for idols and icons and fantasy figures worked for him to some extent, but as with Elvis and others we've seen, it also has a dark side, a deleterious side, corrodes them in some ways. I think that happened with Jack.

Q: Do we have someone who speaks to the present generation. Is it David Sedaris or others? Are there too many to list as opposed to just one giant name?

A: The Kurt Cobains and some of the other self-destructive people who become the poets that young people listen to because they're getting their literature in other forms. In terms of writers, occasionally someone comes around and makes a little splash, but there aren't any figures of that stature, it seems to me.

Q: I was surprised that Kerouac died so soon at age 47. I guess he had a lifetime bout with alcoholism.

A: That's absolutely true and with the passing of years, he became more and more insular and isolated. He'd drive people away from him because as charming as he was and I've seen people who've interviewed him who swear that as much as he would drink, and he would drink usually about a quart of brandy a day, brandy was his drink of choice, Christian Brothers Brandy, but he put it away at the rate of a bottle a day and he probably had other things to drink also, and people would say, even in his cups, he was always a brilliant monologist and could talk and be interesting. But I do think that in his later life, and we're only talking his mid-forties, he became a really lonely man because other people were getting on with their lives. Ginsburg was involved in the peace movement, the counter culture, and Burroughs had his own thing going and I think he apparently would call up friends at all hours of the night and just want to carry on and talk - a lonely guy that dealt with everything through drinking, just became more and more inward. I don't think he was a very happy guy. I do know that he would occasionally return to Lowell. In fact, a guy gave me a copy of a page of the Lowell police blotter, it was 1968, a year before he died, he was in Lowell and he got arrested for intoxication. In the police report, the cop filling out report wrote name, Jack Kerouac, occupation, writer. I don't know if the cop even knew who he was because Kerouac didn't really become lionized again because he'd fallen into decline until years later when people began to rediscover him. I don't think at the time of his death much of his work was in print and now every year it seems there's new stuff coming out. He's translated into umpteen languages and his reputation gets bigger and bigger and bigger. And yet I look at college literary anthologies and many of them have nothing by or even about Jack Kerouac so that he's still popular among young people, sort of wannabe poets, rebels. Artists as diverse as Johnny Depp, who is a notorious Jack Kerouac fan, bought one of Jack's old raincoats for $15,000 or something and yet among some of the keepers of the literary establishment who determine the canon, Jack is still out.

Q: That was true of Ginsburg. Until recently, he was considered just a beat poet.

A: And now he's pretty well regarded. And I think the two of them, Burroughs also gets some due, but I found Burroughs hard to read.

Q: There was a kind of "Rat Pack" concept of the Beats. I don't know if that really exists in our culture today. You get certain loners and lonely guys and talented brilliant guys and women but they're sort of one-offs. They don't travel in a group the way the Beats did and everyone knew everyone else and sort of fed off each other and gave each other energy or shared experiences and kept the critical mass up.

A: And they were in some ways like a group of adolescent boys even though they were grown men because a number of them never married or they had unsuccessful relationships or they were gay and they didn't punch regular time clocks. They would say: "We'll link up in Mexico or we'll get together in Tangier in Morocco," they just had a kind of rootlessness, which I think against the backdrop of what we think of the 1950s when everyone was keeping up and consuming and getting life back to normal after the wars, they were very much out of step with that. I think that's to be admired and I think that's a throwback to Thoreau here in Concord and that little group of people that nurtured each other's thinking and all, but you don't think of movements like that anymore. That's kind of the last of them that I can think of.

Q: Do you think people, the pop psychologists, readers and deconstructionists make too much about Jack's relationship to his mother? He went back to his mother for the safety and nurturing or whatever he needed?

A: I'm sure it'll still be a factor and people will continue to look at that. And the fact that he had three marriages. One of them, I think the first one was very brief. Probably, I think that will continue to be fertile ground, especially people with a Freudian bent will love to dig into that whole mother thing. [He actually lived with her at the end of his life with his wife.] She outlived him and he would go back and she supported him off and on.

Q: What's the thing that you identified with when you read "On the Road?" What element was it that captured you?

A: I think there's a quality of excitement there. There's an enthusiasm, an energy that by contrast with many of the novels I read, Hemingway had that quality especially in "The Sun Also Rises" even though the people are sort of down in a lot of ways and spend a lot of time in sort of meaningless things. This sort of pursuit of kicks, there's an energy there. And in Kerouac, it's big, I mean, it's a novel that moves from here to there. It goes back and forth across the country a number of times. He says "the awful groaning continent" and whether it's on a bus or hitchhiking or riding with friends, there's a real energy there that I think at a certain point in one's life, grabs you because I thought at least, I haven't lived enough, I want to live like that too. I didn't necessarily do a lot of that. I did some but I think there was that. And the other thing I always like about Kerouac is that the character he always writes about is always himself. It's always so very autobiographical and is so thorough-goingly decent. He's kind, he's generous and even though he's down to his last dollar, if he sees someone on the street, he'll help that person out. So there's a real compassion for people in Kerouac that I think is very admirable. He never says a bad word about anybody in his character. And Jack didn't really either. He was very much a pacifist. Not a fighter. And so I found that combination of things: the energy, the enthusiasm and the compassion appealing. Those are attractive qualities.

Q: How about the language? There were two people that appealed to me just because of the sheer force of their language: Norman Mailer in 1968 when he was doing so-called new journalism and Kurt Vonnegut when he was becoming popular as an absurdist writer. The language captured me. Is there anything about Kerouac's language that spoke to you?

A: The two you mention, Mailer and Vonnegut, I felt the same way back around that time period. "Armies of the Night," "Miami and the Siege of Chicago," I loved that stuff. I loved the persona that he created. He was brash. He was letting it all hang out. And Vonnegut was so imaginative and fun and interesting and thought-provoking and subversive. With Kerouac the language is very very big. There are passages in "On the Road" especially, even the very beginning is very muted thing about it - The period I call my life on the road began... . He gets right into it. He talks about what he's been doing and next thing you know he's out on the road, it's nighttime and he's got his thumb out and he's going to go out West to visit some friends. But there are passages that are just beautifully written. He's the observer too. And Neal Cassady's character, Dean Moriarty is what he's called in the book, it's really this paeon to this western character who had been a jail kid, grown up on the streets of Denver, shooting pool. His father was a bum and a hobo and Sal Paradise, Jack Kerouac's character, is really drawn to this guy. He represents something that he as an easterner lacks. He's always looking at these other characters and he says something in there. I'm always drawn to these mad ones. The ones who are mad to live, mad for kicks. I spend my life shambling after them. He describes them as being like Roman candles and that go pop, pop, pop and everybody goes Aww. So there are just some beautiful passages in there. There's one when he's down in the South, down in New Orleans. Actually they go to see William Burroughs. Bull Lee is his name in that book. And as they leave to go farther west, they see the characters they're leaving behind sort of pinpointing the darkness. He says something like, you're always leaving people behind and seeing them disappear and fade away. So there are some language passages in there that are just beautiful. It's pure poetry.

Q: Critics praise you about your own works that you have the same ability when you're writing well, the reader reads those passages without knowing they're reading them. There's no author-reader in there. They're right in there with you just as Kerouac did for you - right there with him on the road. Some of the best things you've done, the readers are right there with your detective in Lowell. How does that happen as a writer?

A: Unlike Jack Kerouac who is a non-believer in revision, although some of his best work is revised, maybe at the behest of his editor, I revise. But he's a big believer in that spontaneous energy that you're not going to get it any better. I frankly don't believe that. I believe, for me at least, that the writing only gets good with reworking and with time. But there are certain times. With Lowell, Lowell was a fool's paradise for me because I never saw Lowell until I went there as an adult. I didn't grow up in Lowell and by not knowing Lowell, I feel completely unconstrained by facts. So consequently the Lowell I write about is one of my own imagining and I try to make it cohere to some sense that the street flows this way and the Merrimack River is over here but beyond that, my Lowell is a poetic Lowell of my own imagining and in that sense I feel I have license to write about Lowell with a kind of excitement and enthusiasm. Even when I am describing something, which on the face of it is pretty lowdown and gritty, it's never very far from being a song in celebration of the city of Lowell. So I found that when I'm writing, some of the passages I like best are where the character momentarily takes a little break from the action and he's sitting and he's looking at something. He's on a stakeout and he sees something or is driving through the streets and it's late at night and he's a loner so he can sort of meditate on what is going on. There's a scene in that book when he goes into a diner and just launches off into this thing about waitresses as sort of being angels of the night and suddenly brings himself up short and says, "you're hopeless, man." So I find those are the passages that grow out of my enthusiasm and then I try to rework them to give them a little gloss.

Q: Writers always have those moments when they're shaving or driving to work or at the market when they hear a little bit of dialog or they see something and it flips in and you have a whole kind of thing you're writing in your head and it comes out on the page.

A: And when it happens, then I've got to quickly try to get it down. But it's amazing, sort of like the lepidopterist who captures this beautiful butterfly, and as soon as he gets it in the killing jar, already the colors are starting to fade. I find that when I do sit down, even if it is only a few minutes later and start writing it, somehow the words on the page don't match what that moment of inspiration was. You can come close but it's something not quite there. It's almost too deep for words as Wordsworth said.

Q: We keep reading in the popular press about the death not only of the novel but of the death of words. Yet there are Barnes and Nobles and other bookstore chains springing up everywhere.

A: I was just looking at Stephen Hocking's book and he was talking about the rate at which knowledge expands. He said that just to be able to keep up with the rate at which books are published (if you were stacking them end to end) you'd have to be moving at 90 miles an hour. That's how fast, that length of books is moving forward. There are a lot of books. The word hasn't died. But publishing is in tough straits these days. It's difficult getting a book published these days. I think it's probably sales-driven. It's partly new models that businesses doing. I don't like that. There's room for that but I don't think it should be everything. It's like Proctor and Gamble buying Gillette. It's the big companies. I think there are two or three really big ones, European companies that own most of the New York companies.

Q: Are you in your rhythm of a book a year? Can you keep it going now?

A: Barring unforeseen accident or death. I'd like to do, in addition to a book a year in the mystery series, I'm working actively on other things and would like to see some of those through to fulfillment as well. It's not a given that they are as publishable. But they're bigger non-mystery-type, more literary. The one that I still have hopes for is one called, "Jack Kerouac's Ghost." Several chapters have appeared as stand-alone pieces in literary journals. But it's a book about a guy whose a writer who comes to Lowell and he's sort of run out of ideas. He begins to spend his nights sort of walking around the streets of the city and one night looks into an old bar that seems to be boarded up and sees someone in there and it looks like Jack Kerouac. In fact it's an old bar, Nicki's bar that did exist back then and Jack Kerouac did go there. And he goes in there and it's Jack Kerouac. Of course, Jack's been dead 30 years. But that's not mentioned. It takes place in 1999 and that's 30 years after the death of Jack. And they become friends. And they hang out and they talk. And Jack says to him at one point, "I'd like to write a new book but I don't know how to use computers. Why don't you become my ghostwriter?" They set up this relationship but Jack insists that if it's going to happen they have to go on the road first and take a trip together. The guy's not sure he can do that. He's married and got a family. He's got a job. How's he going to do that? But he decides to stake it all and do it. So it's kind of an interesting meandering through late 20th-century America. I like it. It's fun. It's not a mystery. I haven't been able to interest anyone in it. The idea grew out of a dream one night. It was a snowy winter. I woke up. I know it was St. Patrick's Day weekend. For some reason I just woke up and this dream was roughly that story. And I just sat down and wrote out long-hand about 20 pages of it that morning. And I said I'd like to do this. And I just stole time from other things and wrote the book. That was one that wrote pretty easily.

Q: Now that you have a body of work, is it easier or harder to add to that body of work?

A: It never comes any faster. I find. I had a nice little break from the university between ending before Christmas and starting back this week. I find given a lot of extra time I'm no more productive than when I'm busy. So I have a routine where I do a certain amount of writing every day and if I have a lot more time, I just don't do any more. That's about all I can stand. I read about writers who can stay at it eight, 10 hours a day. Jack London used to go at it 15 hours a day. I just can't do that. A good four-hour day would be a good day.



_________________________________________________________
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2005 2:42 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 1:57 pm
Posts: 1381
Location: uk
That's a very interesting interview, Liz. It is great to "keep in touch" with writers we've discussed!
Coincidentally, I saw something in Premiere about the adaptation of OTR:

DEPT. OF DEVELOPMENT HELL
GETTING LIT IS ALL THE RAGE IN HOLLYWOOD; IT'S GETTING GREEN-LIT THAT'S THE PROBLEM

On The Road

WHAT: Jack kerouac's classic 1957 tome recalls his cross-country wanderings with Beat icon Neal Cassady.
WHEN: Nearly half a century and counting. Francis Ford Coppola owns the rights and has long hoped to produce a version.
FLIRTATIONS: Director Joel Schumacher and actors Brad Pitt and Billy Cruddup.
POSSIBLE HOLDUP: Adapting a near-plotless book by a mythic author who looms large.
STATUS: Coppola's company, American Zoetrope, promises some new developments shortly.



_________________________________________________________
"Luck... inspiration... both only really happen to you when you empty your heart of ambition, purpose, and plan; when you give yourself, completely, to the golden, fate-filled moment."
Offline
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2005 3:42 pm 
JDZ Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 2:13 pm
Posts: 12488
Location: The Left Coast
suec wrote:
That's a very interesting interview, Liz. It is great to "keep in touch" with writers we've discussed!
Coincidentally, I saw something in Premiere about the adaptation of OTR:

DEPT. OF DEVELOPMENT HELL
GETTING LIT IS ALL THE RAGE IN HOLLYWOOD; IT'S GETTING GREEN-LIT THAT'S THE PROBLEM

On The Road

WHAT: Jack kerouac's classic 1957 tome recalls his cross-country wanderings with Beat icon Neal Cassady.
WHEN: Nearly half a century and counting. Francis Ford Coppola owns the rights and has long hoped to produce a version.
FLIRTATIONS: Director Joel Schumacher and actors Brad Pitt and Billy Cruddup.
POSSIBLE HOLDUP: Adapting a near-plotless book by a mythic author who looms large.
STATUS: Coppola's company, American Zoetrope, promises some new developments shortly.


Wow, Suec. That sounds exciting. :bounce: I'd love to see this as a movie--even if Johnny is too old to play a part. But wait a sec. Isn't Brad the same age as Johnny?



_________________________________________________________
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.
Offline
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2005 8:38 am 
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 1:57 pm
Posts: 1381
Location: uk
Liz wrote:
suec wrote:
That's a very interesting interview, Liz. It is great to "keep in touch" with writers we've discussed!
Coincidentally, I saw something in Premiere about the adaptation of OTR:

DEPT. OF DEVELOPMENT HELL
GETTING LIT IS ALL THE RAGE IN HOLLYWOOD; IT'S GETTING GREEN-LIT THAT'S THE PROBLEM

On The Road

WHAT: Jack kerouac's classic 1957 tome recalls his cross-country wanderings with Beat icon Neal Cassady.
WHEN: Nearly half a century and counting. Francis Ford Coppola owns the rights and has long hoped to produce a version.
FLIRTATIONS: Director Joel Schumacher and actors Brad Pitt and Billy Cruddup.
POSSIBLE HOLDUP: Adapting a near-plotless book by a mythic author who looms large.
STATUS: Coppola's company, American Zoetrope, promises some new developments shortly.


Wow, Suec. That sounds exciting. :bounce: I'd love to see this as a movie--even if Johnny is too old to play a part. But wait a sec. Isn't Brad the same age as Johnny?


Isn't there only 6 months between them? Or 18 - I forget which. But Johnny looks younger! I find it mighty strange to see Brad's name associated with this project, when Johnny's isn't. Funny ole world and all.



_________________________________________________________
"Luck... inspiration... both only really happen to you when you empty your heart of ambition, purpose, and plan; when you give yourself, completely, to the golden, fate-filled moment."
Offline
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2005 11:29 am 
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Posts: 10376
Location: Austin
It seems to be one of those projects that puts fear into those that contemplate it. Kerouac is such an icon and the book is not really a linear story, I can see the difficulty involved. Maybe Johnny feels it can't be done proper justice on film? I don't see Brad Pitt though as Kerouac. Cassady maybe?



_________________________________________________________
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!
Offline
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2005 1:05 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 06, 2004 1:57 pm
Posts: 1381
Location: uk
I agree, DIDHOT. I'm not very good at imagining actors as characters, I must say. But I did think of him as Cassady.



_________________________________________________________
"Luck... inspiration... both only really happen to you when you empty your heart of ambition, purpose, and plan; when you give yourself, completely, to the golden, fate-filled moment."
Offline
 Profile  
 
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 Page 1 of 1 [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


phpBB skin developed by: John Olson
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group