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 Post subject: Life Tidbit #27 ~ Managers
PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2011 5:11 pm 
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Sorry for the delay in this tidbit. But again "Life" interferes......



Andrew Loog Oldham


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Andrew Loog Oldham was born on Januray 29, 1944, in Paddington, London. His father, Andrew Loog, was a United States Army Air Force lieutenant of Dutch descent who served with the Eighth Air Force; he was killed in June 1943 when his B-17 bomber was shot down over the English Channel. His Australian mother, whose maiden name was Oldham, was a nurse and comptometer operator.

He attended a number of schools, including Aylesbury School for Boys, Cokethorpe School in Oxfordshire, St Marylebone Grammar School and Wellingborough School in Northamptonshire.

Andrew was a 19-year-old “hustler, a fantastic bullshitter”, with very little experience and a pocket full of big ideas when he was tipped off by Peter Jones of the Record Mirror about a band who were making waves at a regular gig in Richmond.

He made the trip to the South London suburbs to see and hear this band for himself, and within a few days he was their manager. Never having managed a band before wasn’t a problem for him. He had brief stints publicizing Bob Dylan on his first UK visit and work for Brian Epstein promoting The Beatles in early 1963.

It helped that the band already had an enthusiastic and growing following based on their impressive live performances. But Oldham – assisted by the mass hysteria phenomenon that came to be known as Beatlemania, and his native genius for manipulating the publicity machine (his one previous ‘job’ involved working as a PR stringer for The Beatles during their meteoric ascent from obscurity to ubiquity) – skillfully positioned them as the anti-Beatles - a rougher, more exciting and ‘dangerous’ alternative to the relatively clean-cut Liverpudlian popsters.

This public image was summed up by one of the most provocative questions ever asked of parents, but targeted squarely at their over-excited adolescent offspring – ‘Would you let your daughter marry a Rolling Stone?’ The headline resonates down the years and at the time created a category for The Stones that suited their attitude, looks and music perfectly.

Among many strategies devised and executed by Oldham in his campaign to propel the group to success:

• retaining ownership of the group's master tapes, which were then leased to Decca - an idea learned from Phil Spector, that allowed greater artistic freedom and financial rewards than a standard recording contract;

• he hailed Lennon and McCartney in the street to beg a tune off them; for Mick and Keith then to witness their friendly rivals ‘knock off’ I Wanna Be Your Man in ten minutes in the corner of the studio, and ‘give’ it to The Stones, served as a key moment of inspiration.

• encouraging Jagger and Richards to start writing their own songs

Oldham discovered Marianne Faithfull at a party, giving her Jagger and Richards' "As Tears Go By" to record. He also developed other studio talent with his Andrew Oldham Orchestra, in which Rolling Stones as well as London session players (including Steve Marriott on harmonica) recorded pop covers and instrumentals. These were rediscovered in the 1990s when the indie band The Verve used a string loop based on the orchestral arrangement of "The Last Time" in "Bitter Sweet Symphony"; in the ensuing court battle also involving Allen Klein, songwriting royalties for the Verve track were awarded to Jagger and Richards.

As his acts' success increased, Oldham thrived on a reputation as a garrulous, androgynous gangster who wore makeup and shades and relied on his bodyguard "Reg" to threaten rivals.

Oldham sold his share of the Rolling Stones' management to Allen Klein in 1966, but continued in his role as the band's de facto manager and producer until late 1967. Relations with the group were, however, becoming strained for a number of reasons, including Oldham's drug use and erratic personality; the legal problems that the band was facing in 1967 compounded the difficulties. After Oldham's departure, relationships between Oldham and the Rolling Stones were strained for several years.

In 1965 Oldham set up Immediate Records, among the first independent labels in the UK. Among the artists that Oldham signed and/or produced or guided were PP Arnold, Chris Farlowe, the Small Faces, John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers, Rod Stewart; the Nice; Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, the Amen Corner, the McCoys, the Strangeloves, Duncan Browne.

Oldham also helped Derek Taylor publicize the Beach Boys' Pet Sounds album by taking ads praising the album. Oldham enlisted songwriter Billy Nicholls to record a British response, the album Would You Believe?. After the Small Faces disbanded in 1969, he put together Humble Pie, featuring Steve Marriott (formerly of the Small Faces) and Peter Frampton (formerly of The Herd).

In the 1970s and 1980s, Oldham worked primarily in the USA. He produced Donovan and other artists. In the mid-80s, he made Colombia his primary residence after marrying Esther Farfan, a Colombian model. There he became a mentor for local bands.

Oldham co-wrote a (mostly fictional) biography of ABBA in the 1990s and two autobiographies: Stoned (1998) and 2Stoned (2001), in which he and other music figures recount his days as a manager, producer and impresario. Apparently there was to be a series on HBO based on these books but I cannot find anything in the works:



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In 2005 Oldham was recruited by Steven Van Zandt to host a radio show on Van Zandt's Underground Garage radio channel heard in North America on Sirius Satellite Radio. Oldham is heard daily with a three-hour show on weekdays and a four-hour weekend show. This week’s schedule:



Since 2006 Andrew has worked on many occasions with Argentine musician Charly Garcia. In 2008 he worked on the production of Los Ratones Paranoicos' new album. He also produced and arranged Canadian singer Wyckham Porteous's album 3 A.M. (2008). Since 2008 he has been managing and working with Colombian acoustic/pop artist Juan Galeano on the production of his debut album.

The song Andrew's Blues, sung by Gene Pitney with the Rolling Stones and appearing on the Black Box collection CD1, is a humorous if scathing evocation of Oldham.





Allen Klein

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I had something else all written up on Allen Klein, but it was so scathing (from Wikipedia) compared to the obits I found on him. Plus it was not complimentary of the Beatles, either. So I’ve decided to just post this obit from the BBC.



If you want more dirt, check out this Wikipedia article:



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Jane Rose

I could not find any biographical info on Jane, but did find some photos and an interesting account by studio owner, Gil Markel:




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1978


Pictured (from left to right) are Kathy Woods, Senator Ted Kennedy, Bill Carter, Mick Jagger and Jane Rose:

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At the 19th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony:

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Sources:

BBC
MSN
Rollingstones.com
Studiowner.com
Wikipedia



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You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.
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 Post subject: Re: Life Tidbit #27 ~ Managers
PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2011 6:39 pm 
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Jane Rose is easy to spot she is usually in the background of most pics of Keith :lol: apparently she is the one who arranged for Keith to get involved with Pirates or who made the deal if you see what I mean. She's a very savvy business woman from what I can gather.

The Andrew Loog Oldham books are supposed to be quite good although I haven't read them although there seems to be some very abd blood between him and Mick Jagger and no one knows what exactly.

I'm not surprised there isn't anything nice to say about Allan Klein.

Btw that Gil Merkel site is a good one the Stones went the to rehearse for their 1981 tour of the US and there are some interesting accounts of the Stones in his diary :ok:


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 Post subject: Re: Life Tidbit #27 ~ Managers
PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2011 7:14 pm 
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Mick seems to have had a negative relationship with a lot of people. :rolleyes: I am currently reading Up and Down With the Rolling Stones by Tony Sanchez and he can't seem to say anything nice about Mick at all. From reading that book, I get the impression that Mick fancied himself in control of everything all the time, and that might not have sat well with some of the managers. It makes Keith's comments about Mick seem rather tame and harmless by comparison.


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 Post subject: Re: Life Tidbit #27 ~ Managers
PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 3:14 am 
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nebraska wrote:
Mick seems to have had a negative relationship with a lot of people. :rolleyes: I am currently reading Up and Down With the Rolling Stones by Tony Sanchez and he can't seem to say anything nice about Mick at all. From reading that book, I get the impression that Mick fancied himself in control of everything all the time, and that might not have sat well with some of the managers. It makes Keith's comments about Mick seem rather tame and harmless by comparison.

Remember I said the book should be taken with a pinch of salt. :lol:
Although Mick certainly is a bit of a control freak, even his interviews are incredibley controlled. Better not say more in case its a topic of discussion. :biggrin:


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 Post subject: Re: Life Tidbit #27 ~ Managers
PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 1:53 am 
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Gilbert's Girl wrote:
nebraska wrote:
Mick seems to have had a negative relationship with a lot of people. :rolleyes: I am currently reading Up and Down With the Rolling Stones by Tony Sanchez and he can't seem to say anything nice about Mick at all. From reading that book, I get the impression that Mick fancied himself in control of everything all the time, and that might not have sat well with some of the managers. It makes Keith's comments about Mick seem rather tame and harmless by comparison.

Remember I said the book should be taken with a pinch of salt. :lol:
Although Mick certainly is a bit of a control freak, even his interviews are incredibley controlled. Better not say more in case its a topic of discussion. :biggrin:

Smart girl, GG. ;-)



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