OST Question #23 - Ashbless Quote

by Tim Powers

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Liz
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OST Question #23 - Ashbless Quote

Unread postby Liz » Fri Apr 15, 2011 11:50 am

One more quote to ponder…..


… And unmoor'd souls may drift on stranger tides
Than those men know of, and be overthrown
By winds that would not even stir a hair …

—William Ashbless



Speak to this quote in relation to On Stranger Tides.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: OST Question #23 - Ashbless Quote

Unread postby fireflydances » Sat Apr 16, 2011 3:25 pm

Ah now, to comment on a poem written by an invention who was born in 1785 I believe, and lives today, along with at least one co-authored cookbook? What kinds of recipes? BBQ I imagine. :-O I would love to read "On Pirates" I think, to further illuminate my understanding of the poet's perspective. :eyebrow:

But, to comment on this notable quote:

Some tides are in the sea, some tides are in the mind and those latter tides take us quicker out of the sight of land
Unmoor'd. Are we moored by reality or by our beliefs? But then our beliefs gives shape to our reality.
Winds. The most powerful winds are the emotional winds, love or hate, they blow us down faster and harder with less ability to recover than those Earth-based flows of gas and moisture.

Here, in terms of OST. Hurwood.
"Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed and some few to be chewed and digested." Sir Francis Bacon, Of Studies

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Re: OST Question #23 - Ashbless Quote

Unread postby gemini » Sat Apr 16, 2011 7:42 pm

Since we know that Tim can have Ashbless quotes for whatever he needs in the story, I took it at face value. There were certainly some strange things happening on those tides. Not only were those unmoored souls still drifting on the tides some of them were pretty corporal. I like that he uses tides because they are changing and controlled by unearthly forces like the moon. It sets the mystical theme.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." Will Rogers

Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

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Re: OST Question #23 - Ashbless Quote

Unread postby fireflydances » Sat Apr 16, 2011 7:48 pm

Yes, that sounds good too!
"Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed and some few to be chewed and digested." Sir Francis Bacon, Of Studies

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Re: OST Question #23 - Ashbless Quote

Unread postby TimPowers » Sat Apr 16, 2011 8:07 pm

I find that I've either got a title for a book in mind from the beginning, or else I can't think one up at all. I've read that whenever Hemingway was stuck for a title, he's ask Maxwell Perkins to send him a complete Shakespeare and a copy of the King James Bible, because he was certain he could find a fine title-phrase in one of them or the other. (Who was it that said he couldn't read Hamlet because it's nothing but a bunch of famous book-titles strung together?)

But for this pirate book I was stuck. I wanted a nice phrase from a poem, but I couldn't find anything -- so I just made up a phrase that sounded like a quote, and then made up three lines for it to be a quote from.

On a blog a while ago, people were wondering if Disney's "On Stranger Tides" was connected to Powers's, and somebody wrote and said, Well the phrase is from an old poem, so Disney and Powers may have found it independently.

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Re: OST Question #23 - Ashbless Quote

Unread postby Liz » Sat Apr 16, 2011 11:27 pm

Ha! Love it!

I had a feeling you'd weigh in on this one, Mr. Powers.
:grin:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: OST Question #23 - Ashbless Quote

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:49 pm

If you put the name William Ashbless into Google the following info comes up... ;-)

Wikipedia:


William Ashbless is a fictional poet, invented by fantasy writers James Blaylock and Tim Powers.

Ashbless was invented by Powers and Blaylock when they were students at Cal State Fullerton in the early 1970s, originally as a reaction to the low quality of the poetry being published in the school magazine. They invented nonsensical free verse poetry and submitted it to the paper in Ashbless's name, where it was reportedly enthusiastically accepted.

Ashbless is, however, best known in his incarnation as a 19th century poet, in which guise he appears in Powers' The Anubis Gates (1983) and as a lesser character in Blaylock's The Digging Leviathan (1984). Neither author was aware that the other's novel contained a William Ashbless until the coincidence was noticed by the editor responsible for both books, who suggested that the two consult one another so that their references would be consistent.

In 1985, Powers and Blaylock produced Offering the Bicentennial Edition of the Complete Twelve Hours of the Night: 1785-1985, a prospectus for a non-existent collection of Ashbless poetry, published by Cheap Street Press. ("The Twelve Hours of the Night" had been mentioned in The Anubis Gates as Ashbless's most famous work.) The prospectus included a sample poem and a replica of Ashbless's signature (the "William" was signed by one, and the "Ashbless" by the other, of the authors). This was followed in 2001 by On Pirates (ISBN 1-931081-22-0) — supposedly written by Ashbless, with an introduction by Powers, an afterword by Blaylock, and illustrations by Gahan Wilson — and in 2002 by The William Ashbless Memorial Cookbook.



These links are from Tim's home webpage:



Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!

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Re: OST Question #23 - Ashbless Quote

Unread postby fireflydances » Sun Apr 17, 2011 11:30 pm

On a blog a while ago, people were wondering if Disney's "On Stranger Tides" was connected to Powers's, and somebody wrote and said, Well the phrase is from an old poem, so Disney and Powers may have found it independently


I just love that, makes a person giggle. :grin:

Thank you too DITHOT -- yes, that is the page I found also. And the books, including the cook book. Really do have more questions about all of this for Tim. But I am more than happy to submit them for consideration.
"Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed and some few to be chewed and digested." Sir Francis Bacon, Of Studies


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