Hunter Question #3 - More on Big Sur

by Edgar Allen Poe, William Saroyan, Jack Kerouac and Hunter S. Thompson

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Liz
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Hunter Question #3 - More on Big Sur

Unread postby Liz » Wed Nov 18, 2009 11:06 am

Are you attracted to Big Sur? To visit or to live? Why? Are there any other places you can think of that hold an attraction, magnetism or reputation similar to Big Sur?
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: Hunter Question #3 - More on Big Sur

Unread postby deppaura » Wed Nov 18, 2009 4:15 pm

Recently I have been curious about Big Sur and considered visiting it. Not sure how I would react to the enviroment. Weather was not mentioned, and I am not a big fan of fog. Too gloomy! I must admit I would love to be able to stay at the upscale places!! Don't know that I could handle a rustic, drafty cabin set deep in the redwoods. Hunter did mention loneliness. Maybe at least a drive through with as stop at Nepenthe... Something to consider in the future.

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Re: Hunter Question #3 - More on Big Sur

Unread postby ladylinn » Wed Nov 18, 2009 4:30 pm

I too would love to drive up the Pacific Coast Hwy. and see Big Sur. Not only because of the beauty but to see where so many varied stories orginated. I have only seen the Pacific ocean once while visiting San Fransico and I am sure Big Sur would hold a very different vision.
There are many places and attractions in the US that I have visited and would still love to visit - but as far as magnetism and reputation - I think California has the other states beat. The east and midwest have many interesting places, but they are of older history. California's places are more current (say my lifetime). And with ONBC showing us in tidbits many interesting places - I must make a return visit to California! :hope:

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Re: Hunter Question #3 - More on Big Sur

Unread postby Buster » Wed Nov 18, 2009 5:07 pm

I spent several years living near the coast of Oregon, so Big Sur holds a certain fascination for me. I've pretty much always lived in remote rural locations (the only cities I've spent much time in are Austin,Texas and Madras, India), so to me, sparse population and privacy are big draws.

One of the things that make certain locations "mystical", I think, is just that - it is hard to live there. Not everyone can deal with being snowed in, or rugged terrain, or desert heat, though the sheer beauty of the environment makes for great visits.
Some examples are the Malpais in New Mexico, the Great Salt Flats, or the Everglades...Not exactly hospitable, but incredibly compelling.

I think there are many awe-inspiring spots in the world, sometimes tucked away in very unlikely places. It takes a certain kind of person to thrive in relative isolation. To be self-sufficient, both physically and emotionally, is a rare attribute. (Just curious - what is the longest you've gone without speaking to anyone at all? What is the least amount of money you've lived on for a year?)

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Re: Hunter Question #3 - More on Big Sur

Unread postby Liz » Wed Nov 18, 2009 10:26 pm

Deppaura, the weather there can actually get pretty hot at certain times of year—but that would be more inland. We used to go to Big Sur Campground & Cabins every August or Sept. with friends. It is in the Redwoods and on the Big Sur River, next to the Big Sur River Inn. It is on Hwy 1, but inland at that point--so hardly ever gets foggy. The state campground is right across the way. I have a feeling that some of the places that Hunter refers to were inland. I have seen clear days on the coast but many foggy days. The fall tends to be less foggy. Hey Deppaura, you should be used to fog. One of the things I hated about growing up in Oakland was that there were so many overcast days. But I have to say that my time in Berkeley was more sun-filled. Maybe you folks up there get more sun.

California is great, ladylinn, because it has so many different terrains & cultural settings to offer….many of them dramatic. But I think this is a very personal question, as far as attraction. It’s an individual thing. There are just so many places that attract me.

Buster, you make a really good point that those so-called mystical places are not easy places to get to or to live in. To answer your question, probably the longest I've gone without talking to someone was 6 or 7 hours. That is because I work out of my house, and sometimes it is empty that long. I think one needs to do a lot of planning to avoid talking to people that long. And I don’t remember what I lived on back in the 70’s when I lived in Berkeley….but it was the cheapest I’ve ever lived.

When I think of equivalent places with equivalent reputations, I think of very bohemian and left wing types of places….like La Honda, San Gregorio, Marin County, San Francisco, Berkeley, Sedona, Aspen, Topanga Canyon, Laurel Canyon and Greenwich Village, etc.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: Hunter Question #3 - More on Big Sur

Unread postby nebraska » Wed Nov 18, 2009 10:31 pm

The first time hubby and I drove through the Sandhills of Nebraska and I saw a ranch house nestled in at the bottom of a "hill" I wanted desperately to live there (as long as I had internet). Those folks live miles and miles from everything and I think they can be really isolated in the winter. It would be a different world. I think there are areas of Wyoming and Montana also that are sparsely populated and separate from the craziness of civilization.

A few years ago I was blessed to go to the Black Hills of South Dakota. One of the most beautiful places in the world! :cloud9: To the American Indians, like the Lakota tribe, it is sacred ground. To see all the cabins being built up in Spearfish Canyon and know that biker bars are being constructed close to the native's "cathedral" of Bear Butte is so so so sad!

A middle ground is good, a bit of nature and isolation close to shopping and conveniences like electricity. I really feel like I have the best of both worlds.

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Re: Hunter Question #3 - More on Big Sur

Unread postby deppaura » Thu Nov 19, 2009 1:52 am

Liz...no, I will NEVER get used to the fog.. Seriously, I was raised in the bestest, sunniest, part of San Francisco...The Potrero...not glamourous...but, heavenly weather. We used to say that the city had been planned all wrong and that Golden Gate Park should have been established in the Potrero! For awhile I spent time in beautiful, wonderful Marin. There fog is practically unknown. I guess fog serves the purpose of attempting to cool the folks inland.. otherwise it can just go away...as far as I'm concerned. I figured I would hit Big Sur perhaps in September, October.

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Re: Hunter Question #3 - More on Big Sur

Unread postby Liz » Thu Nov 19, 2009 1:37 pm

nebraska wrote:A middle ground is good, a bit of nature and isolation close to shopping and conveniences like electricity. I really feel like I have the best of both worlds.

Me too. And that's where I live--in the redwoods, where the feeling of isolation exists, but I'm literally 8 minutes from schools and shopping.


Deppaura, I always thought if some of SF had fog, it all did. I think the Sunset district tends to be foggier than the bay side. And Portrero is on the bay side, with that big hill to block the fog off the ocean (if I'm picturing it correctly).
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: Hunter Question #3 - More on Big Sur

Unread postby shadowydog » Thu Nov 19, 2009 2:49 pm

Well I dragged my house down the coast highway in 2004 from the tip of Washington State to San Franciso. (Loved driving through the redwoods) It is beautiful country but a scary drive with your house bouncing along behind you especially when it is foggy. I wanted to go down the coast to Big Sur but that road looked a little too scarey; so I took the inland route. Someday I hope to get to travel through that area. It looks really beautiful.

I love the desert because you can lose yourself out there. My ideal is to camp somewhere where there isn't another human being in sight, so I would probably feel right at home in Big Sur.
I have nothing to do and all day to do it in.

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Re: Hunter Question #3 - More on Big Sur

Unread postby deppaura » Thu Nov 19, 2009 6:01 pm

Liz wrote:Deppaura, I always thought if some of SF had fog, it all did. I think the Sunset district tends to be foggier than the bay side. And Portrero is on the bay side, with that big hill to block the fog off the ocean (if I'm picturing it correctly).



Yes, Liz, bay side, therefore more industrial because of the waterway access.There were times I would look up and see a line of demarcation separating fog from our blue sky. And the Sunset is "socked in" as they say!!


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