Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

by Garry Kilworth

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Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

Unread postby Liz » Fri Sep 25, 2009 11:48 am

A Garry Kilworth quote from St. James Guide to Science Fiction Writers:

I am not greatly interested in the "science" in Science Fiction. I am more concerned with unusual societies, anthropological aspects, social misfits, and exotic cultures. The issues might be contemporary, as I feel they are in A Theatre of Timesmiths, or universal, ageless questions such as the nurture-nature theme of In Solitary. I wish to explore the ordinary human spirit in a stressful state of adversity, and in its relationship to the natural world. I write science fiction and fantasy because their imaginative scope allows me more sweep than would mainstream fiction. Mysticism, including religions of all kinds, forms a thread through my work. On the entertainment level I find the best vehicle for carrying these themes is the adventure novel. In a sentence: jungles, deserts, wastelands and the man-a-lost looking for himself.

Discuss Attica in reference to his above comments about his work.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

Unread postby ladylinn » Fri Sep 25, 2009 12:09 pm

First of all - sorry to say that this is the only Garry Kilworth book I have read. Taking from his quote, I think he wove all of his interests into Attica.
It is fiction that includes fantasy and a great adventure. In the attic the children experienced jungles, deserts, wastelands and each gave the children a lesson to be used in life. It was written so that both children and adults could and should learn its' lessons.
As for "man lost looking for himself" - Jordy, Chloe and Alex were looking for somthing even if at the time they didn't understand what it was. In the end they all found something in the attic that added to their character.
I enjoyed the book and find Mr. Kilworth's writing most entertaining and uplifting. Had a lesson for all ages!! :applause2:

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Re: Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

Unread postby deppaura » Fri Sep 25, 2009 2:01 pm

Yes, Attica is the only Kilworth book I have read. I think Garry is on the same quest as his characters. The mystery and wonderment of our existence to the level we are able to understand it, or not. His explorations visit all facets. He presents his observations with adventure, spirit and affection. And takes us along on a fun journey.

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Re: Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

Unread postby trygirl » Fri Sep 25, 2009 2:42 pm

Attica isn't about fantasy but people. The book is a journey into humans. Take for instance the wardrobe Atticans, and their society, or the African masks, or the mannequins. They each have their own culture, a certain way of doing things and you're either born into these groups or you create your own as with the board combers and bortrekkers, great examples of social misfits and outcasts. He takes his characters out of their comfort zone by literally taking each of them out of their own world, the ultimate test of adversity and the human will. And the mysticism, and other religions, is evident with the voodoo dolls and the collector of souls. The adventure genre is an easy way to convey "man looking for himself" without saying as much in the story. It's Indiana Jones, always searching for treasure, but finding human nature.
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Re: Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

Unread postby gemini » Fri Sep 25, 2009 6:49 pm

I think Garry makes a good point here, not all science fiction is about science. I think of science like our reading of parallel worlds and most of the sci fi I read is paranormal or more mystic in nature. He uses the fantasy and mysticism in Attica to make, as try girl said, his real story about people more interesting.
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Re: Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

Unread postby fansmom » Fri Sep 25, 2009 7:04 pm

I agree; I wouldn't call Attica science fiction at all, because there's no science involved. The attic is a fantasy world. Mysterious forces have created it and established its rules. Inanimate objects awaken and live. An arm inexplicably heals. People are mistaken for other people.

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Re: Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

Unread postby nebraska » Fri Sep 25, 2009 7:15 pm

trygirl wrote:Attica isn't about fantasy but people. The book is a journey into humans. Take for instance the wardrobe Atticans, and their society, or the African masks, or the mannequins. They each have their own culture, a certain way of doing things and you're either born into these groups or you create your own as with the board combers and bortrekkers, great examples of social misfits and outcasts. He takes his characters out of their comfort zone by literally taking each of them out of their own world, the ultimate test of adversity and the human will. And the mysticism, and other religions, is evident with the voodoo dolls and the collector of souls. The adventure genre is an easy way to convey "man looking for himself" without saying as much in the story. It's Indiana Jones, always searching for treasure, but finding human nature.


trygirl, those are some very interesting observations! Even on my second reading of Attica, I have missed some of the layers of meaning.

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Re: Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

Unread postby trygirl » Fri Sep 25, 2009 8:26 pm

nebraska wrote:
trygirl wrote:Attica isn't about fantasy but people. The book is a journey into humans. Take for instance the wardrobe Atticans, and their society, or the African masks, or the mannequins. They each have their own culture, a certain way of doing things and you're either born into these groups or you create your own as with the board combers and bortrekkers, great examples of social misfits and outcasts. He takes his characters out of their comfort zone by literally taking each of them out of their own world, the ultimate test of adversity and the human will. And the mysticism, and other religions, is evident with the voodoo dolls and the collector of souls. The adventure genre is an easy way to convey "man looking for himself" without saying as much in the story. It's Indiana Jones, always searching for treasure, but finding human nature.


trygirl, those are some very interesting observations! Even on my second reading of Attica, I have missed some of the layers of meaning.


Thank you, Nebraska!
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Re: Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

Unread postby Liz » Fri Sep 25, 2009 8:40 pm

I agree with all that has been said. Upon first reading Garry’s comments on his writing above, I would say to myself, Yes! Yes! on every single aspect he mentions. I especially think that Attica exemplifies “the man-a-lost looking for himself.”
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

Unread postby Theresa » Fri Sep 25, 2009 8:55 pm

Liz wrote:I agree with all that has been said. Upon first reading Garry’s comments on his writing above, I would say to myself, Yes! Yes! on every single aspect he mentions. I especially think that Attica exemplifies “the man-a-lost looking for himself.”

I have to say "Ditto, ditto!" to everything said here. :ok:

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Re: Attica Question # 18 ~ Kilworth’s Interests

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sat Sep 26, 2009 9:46 am

Yes to all! Well said. :cool: I can certainly see how the quote below fits the story as well with all the different villages and cultures he has created that inhabit Attica.

I am more concerned with unusual societies, anthropological aspects, social misfits, and exotic cultures
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!


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