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 Post subject: Dillinger Question #13 ~ Interesting Bits
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 12:05 pm 
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What new bits in this book (as opposed to PE) did you find most interesting? If you haven’t read PE, no worries. Just share what you thought was most interesting in Giardin’s account?



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 Post subject: Re: Dillinger Question #13 ~ Interesting Bits
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 2:12 pm 
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I was interested in Dillinger's early life -- his mother's death, his sister's devotion, his stepmother's love for him, his early marriage, all of those things. I don't recall reading much, if any, of that personal background information in PE. In general, there was just a lot more detailed information about Dillinger, even his bank robbing days, in this book. I guess it shouldn't be surprising since this book centered on Dillinger while he was just one of a large cast in the other book, and most of it was really interesting to me.

I was also fascinated with O'Leary and Piquet's constant interaction with Dillinger. I also found the more graphic description of the plastic surgery to be an illustration of Dillinger's desperation as a fugitive.


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 Post subject: Re: Dillinger Question #13 ~ Interesting Bits
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 5:05 pm 
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I haven't read Burrough's Public Enemies but Piquett's bombardment with the so-called G-women is fascinating stuff. The authorities must have been really desperate to believe Dillinger's lawyer could be duped by these "ladies in red," or were these women just earlier versions of Anna Sage doing what Hoover and his boys' club ordered of them. If Hellmann was misjudged then why show up with Joseph Byer, a man Dillinger considered a stool pigeon? Maybe the agents were hoping that honor among thieves would prevail, and Dillinger might acquiesce to a cry for help. They should have picked a better way to him.



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 Post subject: Re: Dillinger Question #13 ~ Interesting Bits
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 6:38 pm 
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nebraska wrote:
I was also fascinated with O'Leary and Piquet's constant interaction with Dillinger.


Yes, the "relationship" between Dillinger and these two was very interesting. Supposedly representing two sides the law, but somehow crossing over the line blending into one another. Again, Shakespearean characters somehow. I missed them in the film.


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 Post subject: Re: Dillinger Question #13 ~ Interesting Bits
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 8:33 pm 
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I agree with Nebraska that I really enjoyed reading about his early life and his family. Which reminds me, I can't recall if it's in this book but in Helmer's thread he mentions that Dillinger was raised a Quaker. Interesting but if I read it before now it skipped my mind.

As deppaura said, the up close and personal dialog with Piquett and mostly O'Leary who tells some of his conversations with his gang members and Probasco, I found the most interesting. It gave a feel for what he was really like more than the newsreels where he was playing for the crowd. In PE Burrough's view of Dillinger was mostly from the point of the FBI and not his friends and family and good acquaintances. I thought "PE" was full of great information and really educational. I am really glad I read it, but "Dillinger The Untold story" was more interesting and entetaining for me because it was more personal.


Last edited by gemini on Mon Jul 20, 2009 2:28 am, edited 1 time in total.


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 Post subject: Re: Dillinger Question #13 ~ Interesting Bits
PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 12:39 pm 
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I have not read PE so I can't compare. As others have said - Girardin/Helmer made knowing Dillinger more personal. The early boyhood years were most interesting. Of course I must remember that the bank robbery time of Dillinger's life is as seen through Piquett's eyes. But this is probably as close to accurate as one can come. I think the FBI (Hoover) version would be more one sided. I enjoyed Girardin's account as it was written close to the real time in history.


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 Post subject: Re: Dillinger Question #13 ~ Interesting Bits
PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 2:14 pm 
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I was very glad I read PE first because it gave me a good historical perspective on the time period and all the different political forces that were at play. Girardin's account is much more personal and written in the style of the period and at the time everything was happening which made it more personal and as close to a first hand account as we will ever have. Like the rest of you, I liked the personal information on Dillinger and his background but I think the historical perspective of PE allowed me to enjoy Girardin's book even more. The interaction between the Piquett, O'Leary and the gang made for a good story, I missed that in the movie too.



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 Post subject: Re: Dillinger Question #13 ~ Interesting Bits
PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 3:08 pm 
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I agree with youse guys that the relationship/interaction with Piquett and O'Leary was quite interesting. Specifically, I thought the episode when the police came to O'Leary's door was exciting.

I also found the episode with Mrs. Chico Marx interesting and that she viewed the whole thing as a lark; and also the letter from Piquett to Mrs. Eulalia Callender, the elderly Ohio woman who wrote rambling letters contending that Dillinger could have escaped from Crown Point only with the help of God, and that it might therefore go hard on whoever shot him down. (pg. 93)



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 Post subject: Re: Dillinger Question #13 ~ Interesting Bits
PostPosted: Mon Jul 20, 2009 11:11 pm 

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Gosh, open the book to almost any page and I could probably point to a bit that I found fascinating. But I think what impressed me most about this account can be summed up in two words: details and dialog!

Some examples of details: The Unity Savings and Trust robbery p.43-44; the Sioux Falls robbery, p.114-116; the Crown Point escape, chapter 8, were all full of such incredible detail that I felt as though I were watching the events unfold before my eyes.
And dialog! p. 43: "Pardon me, Dad," said Dillinger, "I seem to have busted up your store." :dillingerhat:
Or p. 184: "We're from out of town," Dillinger said amiably as the two got up to leave. "We wouldn't want to do anything against the law." :rotflmao:
And one of my favorites repeated throughout the book: "H'yah counsel!" ;-)

Can't you just hear him?


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