Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Author of THE GLASS BOOKS OF THE DREAM EATERS

Moderator: Liz

User avatar
Liz
ONBC Moderator
Posts: 12971
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 2:13 pm
Location: The Left Coast

Status: Offline

Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Unread postby Liz » Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:02 pm

ONBC: Why are your female characters so strong?

GD: First, simply because I like strong women in my life, and second, because I feel like most women in general are stronger than most men. But also, in terms of the book, the societal rules of the time period make it much harder for a woman to succeed in so many of the arenas where the novel goes – action, adventure, suspense, horror – these aren't easy things for any 19th century woman of any social position to wade into. So that automatically makes it more interesting for me to manage, and it means that the women themselves have to be more remarkable.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

User avatar
trygirl
Posts: 1048
Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2008 10:48 am
Location: in the shade

Status: Offline

Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Unread postby trygirl » Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:48 pm

Girl power is a beautiful thing. :lol: I appreciate strong female characters as well, so that's why I enjoyed The Glass Books so much. And I feel that Miss Temple and the Contessa were strong individuals but I was hesitant at first to consider Mrs. Marchmoor, Miss Poole, and Angelique as so. But I suppose one would have to be strong to leave your brothel, the only life you'd ever known, and embark on an adventure with strangers and an unheard-of scientific process. But I also praise the fact that the women were both mentally strong as well as physically. Women of the era were thought of as such delicate, helpless flowers and to have 19th century women who could go head-to-head with any man was brilliant.
I'm not a brand, I'm more of a variety. - Johnny Depp

User avatar
gemini
Posts: 3907
Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2006 9:28 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Status: Offline

Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Unread postby gemini » Mon Feb 09, 2009 2:31 pm

Very interesting! I find it fascinating that as a man you feel women are stronger than men. I know there are many men who would repel the thought. As a female I have always felt that we had more endurance to balance out that men have more physical strength. The thing that made your females stand out for me was that their strength was shown in their intelligence and they were able to match wits with the male villains.

As a female I always felt I was as intelligent as my brothers and lucky to be raised in an age where we were nearly treated as equals. The victorian era would require a bit more fortitude for women to match wits with men because they were financially inhibited. As a female reader, I also like strong women who don't shrink into the shadows and am glad you do too.

trygirl, said
I was hesitant at first to consider Mrs. Marchmoor, Miss Poole, and Angelique as so. But I suppose one would have to be strong to leave your brothel, the only life you'd ever known, and embark on an adventure with strangers and an unheard-of scientific process.


I agree with what you said about the female characters with one exception. That is, I think to survive in a brothel in the Victorian era (or any era) would require being strong even before they made the decision to try the process.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." Will Rogers

Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

User avatar
trygirl
Posts: 1048
Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2008 10:48 am
Location: in the shade

Status: Offline

Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Unread postby trygirl » Mon Feb 09, 2009 2:43 pm

gemini wrote:Very interesting! I find it fascinating that as a man you feel women are stronger than men. I know there are many men who would repel the thought. As a female I have always felt that we had more endurance to balance out that men have more physical strength. The thing that made your females stand out for me was that their strength was shown in their intelligence and they were able to match wits with the male villains.

As a female I always felt I was as intelligent as my brothers and lucky to be raised in an age where we were nearly treated as equals. The victorian era would require a bit more fortitude for women to match wits with men because they were financially inhibited. As a female reader, I also like strong women who don't shrink into the shadows and am glad you do too.

trygirl, said
I was hesitant at first to consider Mrs. Marchmoor, Miss Poole, and Angelique as so. But I suppose one would have to be strong to leave your brothel, the only life you'd ever known, and embark on an adventure with strangers and an unheard-of scientific process.


I agree with what you said about the female characters with one exception. That is, I think to survive in a brothel in the Victorian era (or any era) would require being strong even before they made the decision to try the process.


You're right, gemini, to survive a life of prostitution requires a certain inner fortitude but I wasn't judging Mrs. Marchmoor, Miss Poole, and Angelique based on their life in the brothel but rather outside of it. They don't really seem that strong to me in the book. They're pretty much manipulated and controlled from the start.
I'm not a brand, I'm more of a variety. - Johnny Depp

User avatar
gemini
Posts: 3907
Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2006 9:28 pm
Location: Florida
Contact:

Status: Offline

Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Unread postby gemini » Mon Feb 09, 2009 5:21 pm

trygirl wrote:
You're right, gemini, to survive a life of prostitution requires a certain inner fortitude but I wasn't judging Mrs. Marchmoor, Miss Poole, and Angelique based on their life in the brothel but rather outside of it. They don't really seem that strong to me in the book. They're pretty much manipulated and controlled from the start.

Yes, thats true since the process seems to have been invented for control and it seems the smartest of the ladies, the Contessa, and Celeste avoided it.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." Will Rogers



Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

User avatar
Theresa
JDZ Webmaster
Posts: 26851
Joined: Sun May 01, 2005 1:21 am
Location: Houston, Texas

Status: Offline

Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Unread postby Theresa » Mon Feb 09, 2009 11:41 pm

trygirl wrote:You're right, gemini, to survive a life of prostitution requires a certain inner fortitude but I wasn't judging Mrs. Marchmoor, Miss Poole, and Angelique based on their life in the brothel but rather outside of it. They don't really seem that strong to me in the book. They're pretty much manipulated and controlled from the start.

Perhaps it was an intentional study in contrasts. The weakness of these three women play up the strength of Miss Temple and the Contessa, emphasizing their strength even more.

User avatar
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
Posts: 10378
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 10:43 pm
Location: Austin

Status: Offline

Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Tue Feb 10, 2009 5:40 pm

I agree it would have taken fortitude to be a prostitue, in any age, but they had little control over their daily lives or destinies in the brothels. Just as we discussed women in general had very little control over their lives in Victorian times. The prostitutes ended up substituting one form of control for another with The Process perhaps believing it would give them more control and power.

Theresa, these three women do make a nice counterpoint to Celeste and The Contessa.
:cool:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!

User avatar
trygirl
Posts: 1048
Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2008 10:48 am
Location: in the shade

Status: Offline

Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Unread postby trygirl » Tue Feb 10, 2009 7:36 pm

Theresa wrote:Perhaps it was an intentional study in contrasts. The weakness of these three women play up the strength of Miss Temple and the Contessa, emphasizing their strength even more.


DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:I agree it would have taken fortitude to be a prostitue, in any age, but they had little control over their daily lives or destinies in the brothels. Just as we discussed women in general had very little control over their lives in Victorian times. The prostitutes ended up substituting one form of control for another with The Process perhaps believing it would give them more control and power.


You both make excellent points. It's like day and night, how would you ever know to recognize one if the other didn't exist. I think these women did help emphasize the strength of the Contessa and Miss Temple. And they merely traded one form of subjugation for another. I also believe the 3 were chosen merely because they were so used to being controlled by others. They didn't really leave the brothel, they just took it with them.
I'm not a brand, I'm more of a variety. - Johnny Depp

User avatar
Theresa
JDZ Webmaster
Posts: 26851
Joined: Sun May 01, 2005 1:21 am
Location: Houston, Texas

Status: Offline

Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Unread postby Theresa » Tue Feb 10, 2009 11:49 pm

trygirl wrote:
Theresa wrote:Perhaps it was an intentional study in contrasts. The weakness of these three women play up the strength of Miss Temple and the Contessa, emphasizing their strength even more.


DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:I agree it would have taken fortitude to be a prostitue, in any age, but they had little control over their daily lives or destinies in the brothels. Just as we discussed women in general had very little control over their lives in Victorian times. The prostitutes ended up substituting one form of control for another with The Process perhaps believing it would give them more control and power.


You both make excellent points. It's like day and night, how would you ever know to recognize one if the other didn't exist. I think these women did help emphasize the strength of the Contessa and Miss Temple. And they merely traded one form of subjugation for another. I also believe the 3 were chosen merely because they were so used to being controlled by others. They didn't really leave the brothel, they just took it with them.

Good observation, trygirl.

User avatar
Liz
ONBC Moderator
Posts: 12971
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 2:13 pm
Location: The Left Coast

Status: Offline

Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Unread postby Liz » Wed Feb 11, 2009 12:33 am

Theresa wrote:
trygirl wrote:
Theresa wrote:Perhaps it was an intentional study in contrasts. The weakness of these three women play up the strength of Miss Temple and the Contessa, emphasizing their strength even more.


DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:I agree it would have taken fortitude to be a prostitue, in any age, but they had little control over their daily lives or destinies in the brothels. Just as we discussed women in general had very little control over their lives in Victorian times. The prostitutes ended up substituting one form of control for another with The Process perhaps believing it would give them more control and power.


You both make excellent points. It's like day and night, how would you ever know to recognize one if the other didn't exist. I think these women did help emphasize the strength of the Contessa and Miss Temple. And they merely traded one form of subjugation for another. I also believe the 3 were chosen merely because they were so used to being controlled by others. They didn't really leave the brothel, they just took it with them.

Good observation, trygirl.

:ohyes: I totally agree.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

User avatar
trygirl
Posts: 1048
Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2008 10:48 am
Location: in the shade

Status: Offline

Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #4

Unread postby trygirl » Wed Feb 11, 2009 9:44 am

Theresa wrote:Good observation, trygirl.


Liz wrote: :ohyes: I totally agree.


Thank you ladies! :blush:
I'm not a brand, I'm more of a variety. - Johnny Depp


Return to “Gordon Dahlquist”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests