Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #3

Author of THE GLASS BOOKS OF THE DREAM EATERS

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Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #3

Unread postby Liz » Sun Feb 08, 2009 4:08 pm

ONBC: When writing The Glass Books did you plan on the style of parallel writing or did it come with the development of the characters?

GD: That came fairly early on, literally at the end of the first chapter when I wrote Chang into the train car - from there I knew who would be the focus of the second chapter. Similarly, when I got to the Institute and Chang's overlapping with Svenson, the whole structure was clear. What I enjoy most about it is that "rashoman" sense of getting partial views of events, and partial understandings to the various mysteries. My hope is this makes the characters' own experience feel more real, and also gives the reader a broader, if perhaps teasing, sense of the plot.
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Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #3

Unread postby gemini » Sun Feb 08, 2009 5:45 pm

I must admit here that this is what at times I found tedious reading, but I am an inpatient type and even the teasing of the story folding out kept me a bit rattled. I can see the plus side of learning only parts of events from different viewpoints. When one of the characters was not privy to the reprieve that saved another from being eliminated, we had to wait in suspense that much longer. For those who like suspense, being kept on pins and needles may add to the plot, especially if its made into a movie. It does let you add many character moments for each of our three main interlopers, and what the other cabal members were contributing to the plot. Sometimes as I was reading I kept thinking how the story was so perfect for a film.
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Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #3

Unread postby Liz » Sun Feb 08, 2009 5:50 pm

This clever writing technique surely added to the suspense for me. This will make a great film. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #3

Unread postby stroch » Sun Feb 08, 2009 8:18 pm

I think it could work better in a film. The amount of detail in the sequential viewpoints -- the sheer number of words -- is what I found difficult to cope with. In a movie, the visuals would take care of that, and you would have the unique viewpoint of each character. It would be very interesting to SEE the other characters through each one's eyes.
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Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #3

Unread postby fansmom » Sun Feb 08, 2009 8:49 pm

stroch wrote:I think it could work better in a film. The amount of detail in the sequential viewpoints -- the sheer number of words -- is what I found difficult to cope with. In a movie, the visuals would take care of that, and you would have the unique viewpoint of each character. It would be very interesting to SEE the other characters through each one's eyes.

I think you're exactly right. I've said several times in the discussion that the book seemed very visual to me. (By the way, stroch, I have the dough for a king cake rising in my kitchen right now. I know that if I lived in New Orleans, I'd buy one, not bake it myself, but I don't live in NO.)

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Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #3

Unread postby trygirl » Mon Feb 09, 2009 2:37 pm

I enjoyed this writing style because I like being on pins and needles but I did find myself going back and forth between chapters just to make sure I understood everything and that all was copacetic. But it will definitely make for an exciting movie.
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Re: Gordon Dahlquist Q&A #3

Unread postby ladylinn » Mon Feb 16, 2009 1:42 pm

This style of writing was confusing to me at first. But after figureing out the style, it slowed me as a reader and made me get a better view of each character as he or she got involved with the plot. I really enjoyed the suspense and ups and downs of the timing. Very interesting technique. I liked it!


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