Murder on the Orient Express Question #7: Stereotypes

Murder on the Orient Express by ‎Agatha Christie

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SnoopyDances
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Murder on the Orient Express Question #7: Stereotypes

Unread postby SnoopyDances » Wed Nov 08, 2017 1:45 pm

In creating her characters, Christie has depended on stereotypes -- the English colonel, the American lady, the Russian princess, the brash salesman, and the quiet, obedient servants. Using these short, quick sketches allowed the readers to quickly identify with the characters.

If Christie was writing today, could she rely on stereotypes?

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #7: Stereotypes

Unread postby nebraska » Wed Nov 08, 2017 2:06 pm

In our politically correct day and age where someone is ready to take offense at any minor thing, probably not. But I think the writing would suffer, I think the story would be less graphic, and it would become bland. With the stereotypes the story has a sort of cartoon-like largeness that couldn't be conveyed any other way.

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #7: Stereotypes

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:19 pm

nebraska wrote:In our politically correct day and age where someone is ready to take offense at any minor thing, probably not. But I think the writing would suffer, I think the story would be less graphic, and it would become bland. With the stereotypes the story has a sort of cartoon-like largeness that couldn't be conveyed any other way.

I would agree with that

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #7: Stereotypes

Unread postby SnoopyDances » Thu Nov 09, 2017 9:16 am

It would be difficult, but not impossible.

I noticed the movie version went for a more diverse cast, using a Spanish missionary and a bi-racial love affair between an African-American doctor and white British governess--perhaps not politically correct in the 1930s, but is accepted more today.

But that changed the character of the British colonel from India, since that reference might be difficult for younger audiences to comprehend.

It will be interesting to see what other changes they've made in her traditional stereotypes. :popcorn: :soda:

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #7: Stereotypes

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Thu Nov 09, 2017 9:49 am

SnoopyDances wrote:It would be difficult, but not impossible.

I noticed the movie version went for a more diverse cast, using a Spanish missionary and a bi-racial love affair between an African-American doctor and white British governess--perhaps not politically correct in the 1930s, but is accepted more today.

But that changed the character of the British colonel from India, since that reference might be difficult for younger audiences to comprehend.

It will be interesting to see what other changes they've made in her traditional stereotypes. :popcorn: :soda:

Yes and his very moral stance from what I recall of the 1974 film. Not sure why change that since its set in the 30's. Thats like trying to change history, if people don't get it maybe it might encourage them to look it up, they might learn something.

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #7: Stereotypes

Unread postby SnoopyDances » Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:06 am

Gilbert's Girl wrote:
SnoopyDances wrote:It would be difficult, but not impossible.

I noticed the movie version went for a more diverse cast, using a Spanish missionary and a bi-racial love affair between an African-American doctor and white British governess--perhaps not politically correct in the 1930s, but is accepted more today.

But that changed the character of the British colonel from India, since that reference might be difficult for younger audiences to comprehend.

It will be interesting to see what other changes they've made in her traditional stereotypes. :popcorn: :soda:

Yes and his very moral stance from what I recall of the 1974 film. Not sure why change that since its set in the 30's. Thats like trying to change history, if people don't get it maybe it might encourage them to look it up, they might learn something.

:agreesign:

I think it has more to do with the current PC climate that Hollywood is facing...putting more African-American actors in movies. If I recall correctly, casting was being finalized around the time of the Oscars debate when many African-American actors boycotted.
Leslie Odom jr., is a Tony Award winning actor from the hit musical Hamilton, so he was a great catch for Branagh.

It will be interesting to see how they play it.

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #7: Stereotypes

Unread postby fireflydances » Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:53 pm

I am extremely interested to see how the changes in characters affects the story line. This is a just a guess, I haven't see it yet, but Depp's Ratchett puts a spin on the old man that sure weren't there before. Seeing it Saturday. Can't wait!
"Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed and some few to be chewed and digested." Sir Francis Bacon, Of Studies


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