Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Murder on the Orient Express by ‎Agatha Christie

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby SnoopyDances » Thu Nov 02, 2017 9:12 am

:loveshower: It's time to discuss the book, the movie, and the themes Christie uses throughout. :ONBC:

Some of the questions/discussion might contain spoilers from the book, but most are questions about themes, thoughts, and theory. :-D

So show your ticket to the conductor, take your seat, and enjoy the conversations. :popcorn: :soda: Don't be shy, speak right up when you have something to say! :press:


Do you like mystery stories? :sherlockholmes: What do you look for in a good mystery?
Last edited by SnoopyDances on Thu Nov 02, 2017 9:33 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Thu Nov 02, 2017 9:16 am

No I have never read any, but I like to watch them. I used to like the BBC Miss Marple series that were produced during the 1980's
I think a good mystery is one where you can't guess the culprit. So many seem a bit too obvious.

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby magpie » Thu Nov 02, 2017 3:42 pm

Mysteries have always been my favorite, beginning with the Nancy Drew series when I was a little girl.

First, there have to be characters I can care about, then a plot that is a challenge but not so convoluted that I can't remember what happened early on!

I enjoy historical settings, as well as present-day storylines. The more descriptive the better, I like to imagine myself there on the scene.
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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby Jackslady » Thu Nov 02, 2017 5:41 pm

Yes I like mystery stories. I am completely rubbish at guessing the plot endings, maybe that's why I find them so enjoyable.

I tend to like historical settings I really enjoyed The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton. Set in Holland in the 17th C. the protagonist marries a wealthy merchant, who gives her the gift of a mysterious cabinet. At heart it is a ghost story, but it has many other elements too.
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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Thu Nov 02, 2017 6:07 pm

Clearly I have read more than I thought. As a child I read many of Enid Blytons mysteries. And I have read an historical one or at least one set in modern times but investigating an historical person. Called Daughter in Time by Josephine Tay. . Maybe others I can't think of :lol:

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby nebraska » Thu Nov 02, 2017 8:00 pm

I typically have thought of myself as a non-mystery reader, but I am addicted to Anne Perry's books, so I guess I have to re-evaluate. It helps to have watched Downton Abbey since the stories are set in Victorian times with butlers and the green door, servants and proper rules for Society. I have read a dozen or more of her books now and I don't think I have ever guessed the answer, at least not completely.

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby fireflydances » Thu Nov 02, 2017 9:07 pm

Gilbert's Girl wrote:Clearly I have read more than I thought. As a child I read many of Enid Blytons mysteries. And I have read an historical one or at least one set in modern times but investigating an historical person. Called Daughter in Time by Josephine Tay. . Maybe others I can't think of :lol:


I remember my dad loving Daughter of Time, the best mystery ever he said. He introduced me to Sherlock Holmes (as a child) and Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler and others. I went through a major mystery stories passion period in my twenties.
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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby SnoopyDances » Fri Nov 03, 2017 12:25 pm

magpie wrote:Mysteries have always been my favorite, beginning with the Nancy Drew series when I was a little girl.

First, there have to be characters I can care about, then a plot that is a challenge but not so convoluted that I can't remember what happenedearly on!

I enjoy historical settings, as well as present-day storylines. The more descriptive the better, I like to imagine myself there on the scene.

:lol: The movie spoof Murder by Death did just that. The plot combined all of the greatest detectives of the 30s/40s and created a plot so twisted, no one understood the ending. :biglaugh:

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby SnoopyDances » Fri Nov 03, 2017 12:27 pm

Jackslady wrote:Yes I like mystery stories. I am completely rubbish at guessing the plot endings, maybe that's why I find them so enjoyable.

I tend to like historical settings I really enjoyed The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton. Set in Holland in the 17th C. the protagonist marries a wealthy merchant, who gives her the gift of a mysterious cabinet. At heart it is a ghost story, but it has many other elements too.

I haven't heard of Jessie Burton, but it sounds interesting.

I like historical settings, too. There is something familiar about a story set in the past rather than the present. Maybe I just prefer escaping from today. :perplexed2:

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby SnoopyDances » Fri Nov 03, 2017 12:30 pm

Gilbert's Girl wrote:Clearly I have read more than I thought. As a child I read many of Enid Blytons mysteries. And I have read an historical one or at least one set in modern times but investigating an historical person. Called Daughter in Time by Josephine Tay. . Maybe others I can't think of :lol:

:lol:

Reading was always difficult for me as a product of the TV age. I remember watching Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys, but I don't think I ever read the stories. :blush: I've watched all of The Thin Man series.
And I've watched Miss Marple and Poirot, but this is the first Christie novel I actually read. :noodlemantra: I rather enjoyed it.

I've enjoyed reading all of the mysteries from ONBC so far, except for Daniel Depp's books...a little too twisted for my tastes. :spin:

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby SnoopyDances » Fri Nov 03, 2017 12:31 pm

nebraska wrote:I typically have thought of myself as a non-mystery reader, but I am addicted to Anne Perry's books, so I guess I have to re-evaluate. It helps to have watched Downton Abbey since the stories are set in Victorian times with butlers and the green door, servants and proper rules for Society. I have read a dozen or more of her books now and I don't think I have ever guessed the answer, at least not completely.

I still need to try the Anne Perry books. I know you have mentioned them before.

Still haven't seen one episode of Downton Abbey. :blush:

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby SnoopyDances » Fri Nov 03, 2017 12:34 pm

fireflydances wrote:
Gilbert's Girl wrote:Clearly I have read more than I thought. As a child I read many of Enid Blytons mysteries. And I have read an historical one or at least one set in modern times but investigating an historical person. Called Daughter in Time by Josephine Tay. . Maybe others I can't think of :lol:


I remember my dad loving Daughter of Time, the best mystery ever he said. He introduced me to Sherlock Holmes (as a child) and Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler and others. I went through a major mystery stories passion period in my twenties.

I always loved mystery movies and TV shows (Ellery Queen Mysteries, etc.), but reading the stories takes on a totally different aspect.
Even when I remember Who Dunnit from the movie/TV, I still find the books fun to read.

Good stories and good characters work best every time! :goodvibes:

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby Theresa » Fri Nov 03, 2017 10:57 pm

I guess that mysteries have always been a part of my reading...and watching. I used to read Nancy Drew and The Hardy Boys books, and I read all the Trixie Belden books (like Nancy Drew but the heroine was younger, only 13 years old). Nowadays, I like reading the cozy mysteries...mystery, but with a lighter touch.

As for TV, I wouldn't miss a single episode of Ellery Queen, with Jim Hutton. I particularly loved how just before the last commercial, he would talk to the camera and let us know that we now had all the clues necessary to solve the mystery. So you had the short break to try and figure it out before the show came back on.

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Sat Nov 04, 2017 3:17 am

Theresa wrote:I guess that mysteries have always been a part of my reading...and watching. I used to read Nancy Drew and The Hardy Boys books, and I read all the Trixie Belden books (like Nancy Drew but the heroine was younger, only 13 years old). Nowadays, I like reading the cozy mysteries...mystery, but with a lighter touch.

As for TV, I wouldn't miss a single episode of Ellery Queen, with Jim Hutton. I particularly loved how just before the last commercial, he would talk to the camera and let us know that we now had all the clues necessary to solve the mystery. So you had the short break to try and figure it out before the show came back on.

I remember watching Ellery Queen too.

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Murder on the Orient Express Question #1: The Mystery of Mystery Stories

Unread postby stroch » Sat Nov 04, 2017 8:41 am

Already late to the discussion :bigwave: I read a lot of mysteries because there are so many in the public library. P.D. James, Elizabeth George, and Dorothy Sayers are among my favorites, since I like a lot of description.
Theresa, I too read the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew, but the boys seemed to have the better adventures!
Netflix seems to think that I'm most interested in mysteries since they fill my suggestions screen. Their algorithms must be right. I like the ones set in England, as the actors look more like real humans, and the gore is more restrained.
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