Monday Night Thread ~ Talking with Authors

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Liz
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Unread postby Liz » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:28 pm

bluebird wrote:This is a wonderful question....It opens our minds to the "if only...."


My list is long...
1. Hunter...just because he's Hunter.
2. Greg Roberts...because I love the way he writes and because (I confess) I'd just like to meet him.
3.Tom Robbins
4. Jack Kerouac
6. William Blake
7. John Wilmot
8. William Shakespeare -- the Sonnets, et al
9. Anne Lamott -- Traveling Mercies and Bird by Bird
10. Anne Tyler -- Back When We Were Grownup and Accidental Tourist and Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant, etc., etc.
11. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee -- The Yarn Harlot -- the secret life of a knitter.
12. Edgar Allen Poe
13. Sir A. Conan Doyle
14. Agatha Christie

OK that's enough.... :blush: I get carried away about writers.

bluebird


I can't believe I forgot John Wilmot. Unfortunately, we probably wouldn't be able to post his answers in this PG-13 forum. :lol:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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nebraska
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Unread postby nebraska » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:32 pm

I suppose Irving Wallace would be at the top of my list. I loved his novels He crafted such intricate tales with bits of reality background, with solid writing technique. I loved his books, probably my favorite author of all time. Fletcher Knebel is another author who writes a bit in the same vein. The fellow who wrote the DaVinci Code.....him, too......would be fascinating to know what his beliefs are and how he came to create that story.

Can't remember names :blush: , but the rabbi who wrote When Bad Things Happen to Good People. He brought peace back to my life. I live by what I learned in that book.

John Jakes.....great writer, interesting historical works.......good writing, solid research.

Tom Robbins -- I would love it if he talked like he writes! One of the favorite people I have ever met in my life was a retired Air Force officer, a true Southern gentleman -- I could listen to him talk for hours because he talked a bit like Robbins writes, I love words, Col B used words like verbal art.It would be so cool to find out Tom Robbins talks like that.

Marla Cilly (the FLYlady) -- writer of Sink Reflections and Body Clutter.

Like someone else mentioned, whoever wrote the book I am reading at the moment...

NOTE TO SELF - read more of Hunter's books! The Rum Diary and Fear and Loathing are the only ones I have read, reading bits and pieces here and there I know I need to read more. I have seen flashes of brilliance in some of those brief passages.

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Bohemian
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Unread postby Bohemian » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:36 pm

Hello all - greetings from The Prodigal Reader :blush:

A few on my wish list match up with some of yours:
Dickens
Poe
The Brontes
Ursula LeGuin
John Fowles
Kazuo Ishiguro
J. P. Donleavy

What would I ask? Please - it took me 20 minutes to come up with my list! I would simply hope to convey my interest and appreciation in a respectful, thoughful manner. :hope:
"I feel sullied and unusual..."

"What do I want for the future? I know exactly what I want, everything: calm, peace, tranquillity, freedom, fun, happiness. If I could make all that one word, I would - a many-syllabled word."

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Unread postby lumineuse » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:39 pm

Edna St. Vincent Millay! What a wonderful poet. So descriptive, and forlorn. I'd like to talk to her. I'd like to talk to e.e. cummings. I'd like to talk to Robert Frost. I'd like to talk to the poet of my youth in Indiana: James Whitcomb Riley. And to quote him:

Little Orphant Annie's come to our house to stay,
An' wash the cups an' saucers up, an' brush the crumbs away,
An' shoo the chickens off the porch, an' dust the hearth, an' sweep,
An' make the fire, an' bake the bread, an' earn her board-an'-keep;
An' all us other childern, when the supper-things is done,
We set around the kitchen fire an' has the mostest fun
A-list'nin' to the witch-tales 'at Annie tells about,
An' the Gobble-uns 'at gits you
Ef you
Don't
Watch
Out!

Wunst they wuz a little boy wouldn't say his prayers,--
An' when he went to bed at night, away up-stairs,
His Mammy heerd him holler, an' his Daddy heerd him bawl,
An' when they turn't the kivvers down, he wuzn't there at all!
An' they seeked him in the rafter-room, an' cubby-hole, an' press,
An' seeked him up the chimbly-flue, an' ever'-wheres, I guess;
But all they ever found wuz thist his pants an' roundabout:--
An' the Gobble-uns 'll git you
Ef you
Don't
Watch
Out!

An' one time a little girl 'ud allus laugh an' grin,
An' make fun of ever' one, an' all her blood-an'-kin;
An' wunst, when they was "company," an' ole folks wuz there,
She mocked 'em an' shocked 'em, an' said she didn't care!
An' thist as she kicked her heels, an' turn't to run an' hide,
They wuz two great big Black Things a-standin' by her side,
An' they snatched her through the ceilin' 'fore she knowed what she's about!
An' the Gobble-uns 'll git you
Ef you
Don't
Watch
Out!

An' little Orphant Annie says, when the blaze is blue,
An' the lamp-wick sputters, an' the wind goes woo-oo!
An' you hear the crickets quit, an' the moon is gray,
An' the lightnin'-bugs in dew is all squenched away,--
You better mind yer parunts, an' yer teachurs fond an' dear,
An' churish them 'at loves you, an' dry the orphant's tear,
An' he'p the pore an' needy ones 'at clusters all about,
Er the Gobble-uns 'll git you
Ef you
Don't
Watch
Out!
The goblin's 'll get you if you don't watch out!
"Oh, good!........ No worries, then."

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Bohemian
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Unread postby Bohemian » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:47 pm

lumineuse wrote:I'd like to talk to e.e. cummings. I'd like to talk to Robert Frost.

Two great choices! Someone who might have been great fun to sit down with is Edward Gorey. Not a novelist, but a kind of poet, certainly an artist, humorist and man of words.
"I feel sullied and unusual..."

"What do I want for the future? I know exactly what I want, everything: calm, peace, tranquillity, freedom, fun, happiness. If I could make all that one word, I would - a many-syllabled word."

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Unread postby Liz » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:55 pm

Bohemian wrote:Hello all - greetings from The Prodigal Reader :blush:

A few on my wish list match up with some of yours:
Dickens
Poe
The Brontes
Ursula LeGuin
John Fowles
Kazuo Ishiguro
J. P. Donleavy

What would I ask? Please - it took me 20 minutes to come up with my list! I would simply hope to convey my interest and appreciation in a respectful, thoughful manner. :hope:


Bohemian, glad to see you here. :wave: Hope you join us for The Ginger Man discussion.

I forgot about the second part of the question. :blush: I would have different questions for each author. That will take some thought.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Still-Rather-Timid » Tue Mar 21, 2006 12:15 am

What a blast from the past! Lumi, that James Whitcomb Riley poem was in a very dogeared poetry book I had as a child and it haunted my youth; it was one of my favorites! Like gilly and Bohemian, I would like to talk to the Brontës. But since I have read all of Charlotte's published letters and juvenilia, and they're quite abundant, I would really like to talk to Emily, who left almost nothing behind but her one novel and a few poems and was very mysterious and shy.

I have met Maya Angelou, several times--in fact I once taught in the same English department with her. At departmental parties, she could be a very mean drunk! (In fact I once had too much of her and told her she was rude--wasn't too sober myself.) But I got to hear her perform her poetry a lot, and for very small, casual groups, and that was truly a "great gift."

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Unread postby lizbet » Tue Mar 21, 2006 12:23 am

What an interesting question considering I was thinking about this last night as I watched a docu-drama about the Bronte sisters ~

Towards the end of her life Charlotte (Jane Eyre) 'came out of the literary closet' and went to London to meet with her publisher during that time she had dinner with Wm. M. Thackery (Vanity Fair) and Elizabeth Gaskell (North & South - british novel not the american civil war mini series) - Charles Dickens was a contemporary - wonder why he wasn't there!? Oh well three of my favorite authors in one room at the same time - what I would have given to listen in on that evening!

Like Cait, I am a really big Jane Austin fan (don't forget to put Mansfield Park on your reading list - its now my favorite Austin novel) but I think meeting her would be like meeting Johnny - I'd be so awed that I'd be speechless so I'd need someone else to ask the questions!!! And if she didn't want to discuss her writings I'd be thrilled if she'd read from any of her works or anything else she'd like to read - sorta like Johnny reading from the phone book and still have us swooning!!!!
trying to live in "a profound state of ignorance"

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Unread postby dharma_bum » Tue Mar 21, 2006 1:05 am

We have an accord... Hunter, Jack, Tom, Greg, without a doubt.

Other comtemporary authors:
John Irving
Chuck Palahniuk
Neal Stephenson... if you love historical ficton, the Baroque Cycle is spectacular

Back in time...
Fitzgerald
Dickens
Thomas Hardy... ah, Tess of the d’Urbervilles
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Liz
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Unread postby Liz » Tue Mar 21, 2006 1:42 am

SRT, interesting tidbit on Maya. :eyebrow:

Dharma, I don't know how I could forget about John Irving? I guess that would be the same way I forgot about John Wilmot. :blush:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby lumineuse » Tue Mar 21, 2006 2:15 am

Still-Rather-Timid wrote:What a blast from the past! Lumi, that James Whitcomb Riley poem was in a very dogeared poetry book I had as a child and it haunted my youth; it was one of my favorites! Like gilly and Bohemian, I would like to talk to the Brontës. But since I have read all of Charlotte's published letters and juvenilia, and they're quite abundant, I would really like to talk to Emily, who left almost nothing behind but her one novel and a few poems and was very mysterious and shy.

I have met Maya Angelou, several times--in fact I once taught in the same English department with her. At departmental parties, she could be a very mean drunk! (In fact I once had too much of her and told her she was rude--wasn't too sober myself.) But I got to hear her perform her poetry a lot, and for very small, casual groups, and that was truly a "great gift."


What a hoot that you recall that James Whitcomb Riley poem, SRT! I grew up with it, and it seems like no one else remembers it (hence my quoting it in full - sorry, Noodlemantra's). Riley, like Hogey Carmichael, is a southern Indiana hero.

Yes. I guess I would like to meet the Bronte's. Emily Dickenson would be interesting. Louisa May Alcott. But you got to meet Maya Angelou! And told her about herself! Wow.
"Oh, good!........ No worries, then."

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Unread postby DisIllusionAngel » Tue Mar 21, 2006 2:25 am

Hey Zoners!

Relaxing at home this evening and enjoying all the wonderful insights into the authors listed and I wanted to add a few that I haven't heard mentioned .

Authors I'd love to sit down and talk to:
(listed in no particular order)
********************
Dostoyevsky
Nabokov
Kundera
Tolstoy
Anais Nin
Henry Miller
D.H.Lawrence
Hugo
Dumas
Gibran
Allende
Marion Zimmer Bradley
Frisch
J.K.Rowling
*******************

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Unread postby gilly » Tue Mar 21, 2006 4:15 am

db :disco: ..I'd forgotten Hardy..and I used to read his short stories over and over..So sad and beautiful at the same time.lumi...I read 'A Portrait of an Artist 'at University and I just couldn't get my head around it..Joyce was called arrogant by more than one person who met him and apparently regarded himself as the best writer to have come out of Ireland...So I probably would have ended up bopping him,if I'd met him.. :capnjack:
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Unread postby SweetSam » Tue Mar 21, 2006 4:16 am

DisIllusionAngel wrote:Marion Zimmer Bradley
J.K.Rowling


Yes, Marion Zimmer Bradley, J.K.Rowling, and also Francesca Leah Block, and Neale Donald Walsch!

I know this may sound like a strange combination, but all of these have had a strong influence in my life!
Depp: It's true. I don't sing along to music.
Q: "Brown Sugar" comes on …
Depp: I might sing a little harmony. I might air guitar. Drumming. I like to drum.

'ello, Beastie! — CJS, DMC
I wish to be moved. — JD as JW

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Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Tue Mar 21, 2006 5:32 am

Interesting choices, some I agree with too, but I can't think of anyone in particular or what I would want to talk to them about.
Tolkien maybe, perhaps Anne McCaffrey another favorite author.
What about Samuel Pepys or Beatrix Potter?


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