Monday Night Thread ~ Talking with Authors

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Unread postby Liz » Mon Mar 20, 2006 10:52 pm

lumineuse wrote:I just finished reading "The Narnian", a book which was not so much a biography as a chronology of a man's changing beliefs over time and the effect that had upon his writing. A person who did not want to become a Christian, but did, despite himself, become a reknowned "apologist", and the effect that apologetics had upon his beliefs. A person who gave me the gift of "Narnia", which I have had for at least 40 years, and I see my nieces and nephews having for years beyond me. Yes, I wish I could talk to him.


Are you talking about C.S. Lewis?
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Unread postby lumineuse » Mon Mar 20, 2006 10:54 pm

Liz wrote:
lumineuse wrote:I just finished reading "The Narnian", a book which was not so much a biography as a chronology of a man's changing beliefs over time and the effect that had upon his writing. A person who did not want to become a Christian, but did, despite himself, become a reknowned "apologist", and the effect that apologetics had upon his beliefs. A person who gave me the gift of "Narnia", which I have had for at least 40 years, and I see my nieces and nephews having for years beyond me. Yes, I wish I could talk to him.


Are you talking about C.S. Lewis?


Yes
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Unread postby gilly » Mon Mar 20, 2006 10:56 pm

I'd love to be able to talk to Oscar Wilde..I've just read De Profundis,which Johnny is meant to have read and it's so profoundly beautiful..all about the old themes of forgiveness and redemption..Oh to be able to talk to the author of such a moving piece :bounce: ...The other 'author' that springs to mind is William Shakespeare..I am a Shakespeare fan and have read just about all his plays, including the boring comedies and I think it would be such an incredible privilege to be able to quizz this man's brain..If you throw in Jane Austen,The Bronte sisters and George Bernard Shaw..it would be heaven.. :cool: :cloud9:
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Unread postby luvdepp » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:00 pm

Leave it to the Noodlemantras to always expand my reading choices! I've now got the Outlander series on my "to be read" list. I've heard about that series for a long time and never have gotten around to reading them.

When I first read the question, my first thoughts were Gregory Roberts and Tom Robbins. Of course Hunter I'm sure would be a kick too. I'd be interested in asking Janet Evanovich who her inspirations are for her two main male characters in her Stephanie Plum novels because I can't help but picture Johnny in both roles. And he's been mentioned in her books.
Last edited by luvdepp on Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:00 pm

gilly, I have De Profundis in my reading stack as well. I'm glad to read your comments on it. :cool:
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Unread postby Liz » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:02 pm

lumineuse wrote:
Liz wrote:
lumineuse wrote:I just finished reading "The Narnian", a book which was not so much a biography as a chronology of a man's changing beliefs over time and the effect that had upon his writing. A person who did not want to become a Christian, but did, despite himself, become a reknowned "apologist", and the effect that apologetics had upon his beliefs. A person who gave me the gift of "Narnia", which I have had for at least 40 years, and I see my nieces and nephews having for years beyond me. Yes, I wish I could talk to him.


Are you talking about C.S. Lewis?


Yes


One of the most helpful books I ever read was Mere Christianity, by C.S Lewis. I think it is because he had been so resistant.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Veronica » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:05 pm

Liz wrote:KY, our list is very similar. Here is mine:

Hunter
Greg Roberts
Tom Robbins
Lisa See
Barbara Kingsolver
F. Scott Fitzgerald


oh yes Tom Robbins to be sure!!!
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Unread postby bluebird » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:08 pm

This is a wonderful question....It opens our minds to the "if only...."


My list is long...
1. Hunter...just because he's Hunter.
2. Greg Roberts...because I love the way he writes and because (I confess) I'd just like to meet him.
3.Tom Robbins
4. Jack Kerouac
6. William Blake
7. John Wilmot
8. William Shakespeare -- the Sonnets, et al
9. Anne Lamott -- Traveling Mercies and Bird by Bird
10. Anne Tyler -- Back When We Were Grownup and Accidental Tourist and Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant, etc., etc.
11. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee -- The Yarn Harlot -- the secret life of a knitter.
12. Edgar Allen Poe
13. Sir A. Conan Doyle
14. Agatha Christie

OK that's enough.... :blush: I get carried away about writers.

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Unread postby lumineuse » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:10 pm

It's an endless list, isn't it? There are too many books I still want to read, but there are many authors I would still like to understand better. I guess James Joyce is supposed to be brilliant, and I guess I wouldn't mind asking him why he is SO brilliant that the rest of us should work so hard to comprehend him. I can talk above a lot of people's heads, but that is not communication. How does he define communication? If he is the only one who is THAT brilliant, how is that art, let alone communication? Isn't every art a form of communication? How was he able to set his self above all coherence? I don't get it. Maybe he could explain.
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Unread postby lumineuse » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:13 pm

Liz wrote:
lumineuse wrote:
Liz wrote:
lumineuse wrote:I just finished reading "The Narnian", a book which was not so much a biography as a chronology of a man's changing beliefs over time and the effect that had upon his writing. A person who did not want to become a Christian, but did, despite himself, become a reknowned "apologist", and the effect that apologetics had upon his beliefs. A person who gave me the gift of "Narnia", which I have had for at least 40 years, and I see my nieces and nephews having for years beyond me. Yes, I wish I could talk to him.


Are you talking about C.S. Lewis?


Yes


One of the most helpful books I ever read was Mere Christianity, by C.S Lewis. I think it is because he had been so resistant.


I have found that book especially helpful to me, because he seems like someone who lived my own spiritual struggles.
"Oh, good!........ No worries, then."

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:19 pm

bluebird, have you read Ladder of Years by Anne Tyler? I enjoyed that one very much. And of course John Wilmot!

lumi, I recently came across a quote by Jame Joyce and he said that he had put enough enigmas and puzzles in Finnegans Wake to keep scholars guessing for years.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby Liz » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:22 pm

lumineuse wrote:
Liz wrote:
lumineuse wrote:
Liz wrote:
lumineuse wrote:I just finished reading "The Narnian", a book which was not so much a biography as a chronology of a man's changing beliefs over time and the effect that had upon his writing. A person who did not want to become a Christian, but did, despite himself, become a reknowned "apologist", and the effect that apologetics had upon his beliefs. A person who gave me the gift of "Narnia", which I have had for at least 40 years, and I see my nieces and nephews having for years beyond me. Yes, I wish I could talk to him.


Are you talking about C.S. Lewis?


Yes


One of the most helpful books I ever read was Mere Christianity, by C.S Lewis. I think it is because he had been so resistant.


I have found that book especially helpful to me, because he seems like someone who lived my own spiritual struggles.


Yes.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby bluebird » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:25 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:bluebird, have you read Ladder of Years by Anne Tyler? I enjoyed that one very much. And of course John Wilmot!

lumi, I recently came across a quote by Jame Joyce and he said that he had put enough enigmas and puzzles in Finnegans Wake to keep scholars guessing for years.


DITHOT ~~ No, I haven't read Ladder of Years, or Saint Maybe, both are waiting patiently on my bookshelf but have been pushed aside by others on my "pile."
RE: John Wilmot....I ordered A Profane Wit from Amazon last week and just got notice that it's back ordered!! wonder if ONBCers have anything to do with that??????

RE: James Joyce...I've tried, really I have, to read Finnegan's Wake, several times because I think I should, but since I'm no scholar, I'm not up to the challenge of all his "enigmas and puzzles." Of course, we had enough of those in Gangemi's Inamorata!!!

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Unread postby lumineuse » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:27 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:[lumi, I recently came across a quote by Jame Joyce and he said that he had put enough enigmas and puzzles in Finnegans Wake to keep scholars guessing for years.[/b]


I know he did. But what I have to wonder is = Why should we care? That work seems like the most supremely arrogant thing I have ever tried to read! Why should I? Has any scholar actually figured out anything profound about it? Or are they just pretending it's profound because they don't get it?

Personally, I tried to read it ONCE. My time is more valuable than that. Perhaps it's the world's greatest book, but if it is deliberately incoherent to people of above average intelligence, it is not going down in history with Shakespeare, nor Homer
Last edited by lumineuse on Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Mon Mar 20, 2006 11:27 pm

Noodlemantras, DITHOT is checking out for the evening. :zzz: After being off last week for spring break, work has come as a rude shock to my system today! :freaked: I'll look forward to seeing more of your answers in the morning. :cool:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!


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