Two more books Johnny has read

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gilly
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Two more books Johnny has read

Unread postby gilly » Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:41 pm

FAN posted some tidbits about Johnny from when he was filming From Hell....Here's the pagehttp://www.johnnydepp-zone.com/boards/viewtopic.php?t=23103
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Unread postby Theresa » Thu Dec 29, 2005 10:18 pm

Confessions of an English Opium Eater and The Hashish Eaters

I'm not so sure that these two books are going to end up in my stack. I think the subjects might be a little too "specialized" for me. :-O :lol:

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DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Thu Dec 29, 2005 10:36 pm

Thanks for the link, gilly! Hashish bonbons? :eyebrow:
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Unread postby Bix » Fri Dec 30, 2005 1:39 am

Dang, hashish bonbons would be my first choice of victuals for my covered wagon trip across the country - way ahead of fatback and hardtack and cornmeal mush and stuff like that! Hell, I might have even made it the whole way!
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Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Fri Dec 30, 2005 4:19 am

Well if anyone does feel the need to read here is the first one from Amazon UK

Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (Dover Thrift S.)
Thomas De Quincey

Paperback 80 pages (October 1995)
Publisher: Dover Publications
Language: English
ISBN: 0486287424

Anyone looking to read a juicy, scandalous account of opium in the 19th century will be bitterly disappointed. That is not to say that De Quincey's work is not brilliant and engaging. However, his prose style can be frustrating to the reader in search of simple entertainment. It is only towards the end of the book that De Quincey begins to describe his opium visions-- the rest of the narrative is a dense, minutely detailed account of his childhood and the struggles of his adolescence. He takes the reader through various stages in his life in passages which are extremely digressive and wordy. However, If the reader is patient enough to labor through the prose, he or she will be richly rewarded by the eloquence of a brilliant mind. De Quincey's style could be compared to a musical work which moves slowly, yet progresses to a crescendo all the more grand for its deliberation. His stock of knowledge is immense, and he writes with authority on virtually every subject from the poetry of Wordsworth to the etymology of his own name. He seems to delight in the process of memory and its property of magnifying incidents of the past to mythical proportions and setting patterns for the future. He takes a psychoanalytic view of his life years before Freud. To him, opium seems a prism through which to examine the themes of his past, and his narrative is largely a psychological self-scrutiny. In his early life, De Quincey runs away from school, tramps around in Wales, sets off for London, and lives penniless and starving among prostitutes and men of dubious reputation. A highly sympathetic character, he strives to learn from all humans regardless of station. He describes his wanderings in detail, discusses the impact of opium upon his life, and concludes by describing a few of his dreams in passages which approach virtuosity in style. He reveals himself as a thoughtful nonconformist driven to share his innermost perceptions of himself and the world. Alethea Hayter's introduction details his life and works, and the carefully chosen excerpts from his letters and revised version of the Confessions round out the reader's view of De Quincey

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Unread postby gilly » Fri Dec 30, 2005 6:17 am

I read this at Uni. and I quite liked it at the time.I loved his descriptions.....I must revisit it. :noodlemantra: ..
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Fri Dec 30, 2005 1:58 pm

Bix, it certainly would have made the trip more interesting! :hypnotic:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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gilly
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Unread postby gilly » Fri Dec 30, 2005 11:17 pm

I'm not sure who wrote The Hashish Eaters..it could be this,as the hashhish is delivered in a box,later in the story :cool: http://users.lycaeum.org/~sputnik/Ludlow/Texts/anon.html There was also a poem called The Hashish Eater written by Clark Ashton Smith back in 1922
Life is beautiful.



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