TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

by Arturo Perez-Reverte

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TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Liz » Fri Aug 08, 2008 11:56 am

Pg. 325. “I smiled. “That’s the rule: no names, no starring roles…As you can see, the matter is scholarly and slightly childish at the same time. A nostalgic literary game that rediscovers long-lost novels and returns us to our innocence, to how we used to be. As we mature, we admire Flaubert or prefer Stendhal, or Faulkner, Lampedusa, García Marquez, Durrell, Kafka. We become different from each other, opponents even. But we all share a conspiratorial wink when we talk about certain magical authors and books. Those that made us discover literature without weighing us down with dogma or teaching us rules. This is our true common heritage: stories faithful not to what people see but to what people dream.” Comment.
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Fri Aug 08, 2008 1:03 pm

Interesting passage took me a while to find it as my copy is different. I think I'd have to agree with what he says.

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby fansmom » Fri Aug 08, 2008 4:18 pm

My comment would be that I've only read four of the authors he listed, and I have no desire to read any more of their works. (That may mean my taste hasn't matured yet. :blush:) The books I listed yesterday that I loved--LOTR, the Narnia books, and Sherlock Holmes--are indeed things I have loved since adolescence, and two of the three literally involve magic.

The fact that so few of us have read T3M would imply to me that it's not part of our cultural heritage. We're culturally literate enough to be able to identify characters and plot points but we're not passionate about the stories.

And I think he's quite wrong he implies--a bit after Liz's quote--that children and young people will no longer get any spiritual heritage from books. Ask J.K. Rowling what she thinks about that.

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Parlez » Fri Aug 08, 2008 5:07 pm

Here I think Perez-Reverte is showing his scholarly approach to literature and lamenting it to some degree, harking back to the good old days when he didn't bring so much baggage along when he read a book. All in all that sentiment makes me glad I didn't pay too much attention in English Lit 101 and never entertained the notion of studying the subject beyond the required coursework. I can adopt a disciplined, scholarly approach to non-fiction, like philosophy books, but not to fiction.

Having said that, this passage confuses me because when I think of an author who inspires pure magical pleasure for moi it's Garcia-Marquez. And there he is, listed on the erudite side of the ledger. Who knew?? Does that make me a pseudo-scholarly-literary snob in
P-R's eyes? :-?
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby fansmom » Fri Aug 08, 2008 5:10 pm

Parlez wrote:Does that make me a pseudo-scholarly-literary snob in P-R's eyes? :-?
Well, I read it as saying those were the tastes of maturity, not pseudo-anything.

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Parlez » Fri Aug 08, 2008 5:45 pm

fansmom wrote:
Parlez wrote:Does that make me a pseudo-scholarly-literary snob in P-R's eyes? :-?
Well, I read it as saying those were the tastes of maturity, not pseudo-anything.

Well, one might equate maturity with erudition (as in literary-scholarly snobbery). My point was that I don't consider Garcia-Marquez as a writer who appeals to any of those things, least of all maturity. To me his writing is innocent, magical and pure fun.
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Fri Aug 08, 2008 5:48 pm

fansmom wrote:The fact that so few of us have read T3M would imply to me that it's not part of our cultural heritage. We're culturally literate enough to be able to identify characters and plot points but we're not passionate about the stories.

And I think he's quite wrong he implies--a bit after Liz's quote--that children and young people will no longer get any spiritual heritage from books. Ask J.K. Rowling what she thinks about that.


I think thats true I think though certainly in the Uk we do study alot of our own culteral heritage in lituratre but these days even that is shifting to more modern writers more international writers.
But I also think although children enjoy the Harry Potter books will they still look at them in the same way we looked at books from our youth when so many don't read for pleasure.

Parlez wrote:
Here I think Perez-Reverte is showing his scholarly approach to literature and lamenting it to some degree, harking back to the good old days when he didn't bring so much baggage along when he read a book

:cool: good point

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby gemini » Fri Aug 08, 2008 5:49 pm

Well, I think the point here is that our literary tastes change but we all have those learning experiences with certain books where we look back on and like to compare the reading experience with others. We are all different but have shared some of the same past.
I do read more nonfiction now than when I was young and read more for the learning experience but I could never be considered a literary snob because I will read anything that holds my interest, fact or fiction.
I don't read authors because they are famous or considered good reading by the masses, unless the story holds my interest, including childrens books.
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Fri Aug 08, 2008 5:53 pm

gemini wrote:Well, I think the point here is that our literary tastes change but we all have those learning experiences with certain books where we look back on and like to compare the reading experience with others. We are all different but have shared some of the same past.
I do read more nonfiction now than when I was young and read more for the learning experience but I could never be considered a literary snob because I will read anything that holds my interest, fact or fiction.
I don't read authors because they are famous or considered good reading by the masses, unless the story holds my interest, including childrens books.


My tastes have certainly changed and perhaps broadened alot too

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Liz » Fri Aug 08, 2008 8:10 pm

Gilbert's Girl wrote: But I also think although children enjoy the Harry Potter books will they still look at them in the same way we looked at books from our youth when so many don't read for pleasure.

I wonder that too, GG. I think our generation read more for pleasure than the kids do today. But I do think they will look with fondness on Harry Potter.

For those of you who can’t find this passage, it is about half way through Chapter XV. Corso and Richelieu. And I just now got what you were talking about, Fansmom, about children lacking a spiritual heritage. Corso says he disagrees with Balkan’s words here and that children, young people, no one has a spirtitual heritage because they all watch TV. I would agree that children today have less of a love for books in years past because of the TV, video games and computers. But I wouldn't term that as a lack of a spiritual heritage as he does.

I look at Balkan's statement from a broader perspective, in that I think those of us who love reading enjoy losing ourselves in books, disappearing for a while...... lost in mysteries, adventures, romances or other peoples lives—other people’s dreams and maybe our own. It is an escape for our mundane lives and our worries. We live vicariously through the protagonist(s).

Very interesting answers all around! :cool:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Fri Aug 08, 2008 9:13 pm

"Those that made us discover literature without weighing us down with dogma or teaching us rules. This is our true common heritage: stories faithful not to what people see but to what people dream.”


I think he is speaking to all of us, asking us to remember what inspired to be readers and not to get bogged down with comparisons and technique. It doesn't matter in the long run what authors you admire or prefer, just remember that first book that made you want to read more, that transported you into another world, that made you realize how the written word touched you.
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby fansmom » Fri Aug 08, 2008 9:40 pm

Literary criticism--
http://xkcd.com/451/
:grin:

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Fri Aug 08, 2008 10:55 pm

We moderators would know nothing about that... :grin:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Liz » Sat Aug 09, 2008 1:28 am

:lol:

I'm still reeling over the references to paper, printing blocks and caligraphy and the influence on these by the Chinese as expressed in the opening ceremonies on 8/8/8. :-O What more can one say? :notworthy:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Sat Aug 09, 2008 1:45 am

I'd agree with both your comments Liz and DITHOT :cool:

Interesting isn't it really how much the Chinese have influenced us in many ways that we probably don't realise.


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