TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Parlez » Sat Aug 09, 2008 9:32 am

Gilbert's Girl wrote:Interesting isn't it really how much the Chinese have influenced us in many ways that we probably don't realise.

And don't forget the fireworks! Woo! The mind boggles to think that if China could influence the West with their cultural goodies when they were essentially an isolated, remote, and self-contained country, imagine what influences are to come...
"Belay that! ...Do something else!" ~ Hector Barbossa
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby nebraska » Sat Aug 09, 2008 8:41 pm

I remember reading about Dick and Jane when I first learned to read - and Sally and Spot the dog and Puff the cat. It was a magical time for me, that first experience with being able to read! I think anyone who first learned to read with Dick and Jane would probably share that sense of wonder.

And look how much we as ONBC members share! Even though we are beyond that initial innocence, all the things we have shared over the years have created a real bond, I think!

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Liz » Sun Aug 10, 2008 2:00 am

nebraska wrote:I remember reading about Dick and Jane when I first learned to read - and Sally and Spot the dog and Puff the cat. It was a magical time for me, that first experience with being able to read! I think anyone who first learned to read with Dick and Jane would probably share that sense of wonder.

And look how much we as ONBC members share! Even though we are beyond that initial innocence, all the things we have shared over the years have created a real bond, I think!

Wow! I'm impressed. I don't remember that far back about reading. My first memories of reading are not good ones--and probably in 3rd or 4th grade. I remember the boring readers that we had to read in school, and then being tested on retention and comprehension and being told that I wasn't meeting expectations (although I'm sure it wasn't worded as politically correct as that back then). And then I remember telling the local librarian that I hated to read. Then I fast forward to sophomore year in high school when I did a 360 due to The Great Gatsby and Ethan Frome. Sorry to shock you guys like that. We all mature at different rates.
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby suec » Sun Aug 10, 2008 5:21 am

I loved reading as a child. My gran taught me to read before I went to school.. My first memory of a book that I owned is Cinderella and that was in the reception class when I was four. I spent all my time reading as a child. I loved being transported to another world. My favourite with The Lord of The Rings, and I used to read it regularly - but not at all since I saw the films. :-/ I loved the films - but there is nothing left to imagine now. But I still love fantasy writing.
T3M was a book I read as a child so I suppose it is part of my heritage. I think I like Balkan's reply to Corso - about Indiana Jones being the direct descendent. It's funny he should quote that one because didn't Spielberg say he was trying to create the kind of thing he used to like watching as a child? I was thinking that in a way, the film that T3M is most similar to in a way is Star Wars, but I also think the POTC films are in the same tradition. Very much so. And we all know how popular they are. Few books seem to have the same appeal these days but I agree with fansmom about Harry Potter. I rememember noticing at the CATCF premiere how many people were reading it while they were waiting. All of my friends have read it and most of my family apart from my dad who doesn't read fiction. And it was remarkable for being such a shared experience. It was such a talking point among friends. Who would die in the last book? What was Snape after all? Would Ron turn to He Who Must Not Be Named (a friend's theory). Waiting for the next book to be published must be like waiting for the next installment in the serial of books like T3M.
T3M is a fun read. When I thought about it, I remembered their escapapades and some very clearly. One stood out as a "stand alone" which was when they decide they need somewhere to have a private conversation so they accept a challenge to stay for one hour in a no-man's land between two warring armies. They stay for longer, not leaving until they have finished both their breakfasts and their conversations. What lingers in the memory is the panache, the banter, the coolness, the kind of thing we probably expect in an adventure movie. (Well, I do, anyway).
I picked up the book again with a bit of reluctance, because the language is old-fashioned, but I was caught up in it very quickly. It rattles along at such a fast pace. I'll always enjoy reading that kind of book. I read other books as well, for different reasons. But that young-at heart type of book will always be a firm favourite.
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Parlez » Sun Aug 10, 2008 10:18 am

Liz wrote:
nebraska wrote:I remember reading about Dick and Jane when I first learned to read - and Sally and Spot the dog and Puff the cat. It was a magical time for me, that first experience with being able to read! I think anyone who first learned to read with Dick and Jane would probably share that sense of wonder.

And look how much we as ONBC members share! Even though we are beyond that initial innocence, all the things we have shared over the years have created a real bond, I think!

Wow! I'm impressed. I don't remember that far back about reading. My first memories of reading are not good ones--and probably in 3rd or 4th grade. I remember the boring readers that we had to read in school, and then being tested on retention and comprehension and being told that I wasn't meeting expectations (although I'm sure it wasn't worded as politically correct as that back then). And then I remember telling the local librarian that I hated to read. Then I fast forward to sophomore year in high school when I did a 360 due to The Great Gatsby and Ethan Frome. Sorry to shock you guys like that. We all mature at different rates.

I am not shocked - I was a late bloomer too, Liz. :highfive:
I can remember my favorite children's book, The Story of Ferdinand, by Munro Leaf, but then I draw a blank until much later, when I picked up a copy of Michner's Hawaii one boring summer in Iowa. That certainly set up my taste for looong novels! And, like you, gemini, I favor stories (real or imagined) that take me out of my mundane reality and get me totally lost in another place and time.
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Aug 10, 2008 10:36 am

I definitely remember Dick, Jane, Spot and company! My favorite book as a child was Winnie the Pooh. I had a nice hardcover edition that my dad would read to me every night. He often travelled to New York City and would go to the big toy store, FAO Schwartz, and bring me back one of the Winnie the Pooh stuffed animals. I still have my original Pooh Bear. :blush: I think that book started me on the road to be a life long reader.
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Parlez » Sun Aug 10, 2008 10:56 am

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:I definitely remember Dick, Jane, Spot and company! My favorite book as a child was Winnie the Pooh. I had a nice hardcover edition that my dad would read to me every night. He often travelled to New York City and would go to the big toy store, FAO Schwartz, and bring me back one of the Winnie the Pooh stuffed animals. I still have my original Pooh Bear. :blush: I think that book started me on the road to be a life long reader.

OMG, DitHoT - thanks for that memory. My Dad read to me every night too - only it was Pogo comics! Not a literary heavyweight, my Dad, but oh, how we would laugh! Now I flash on what I was reading during all those blank years in school: comics! Archie, Little Lulu, Prince Valiant, etc., etc.. What a hoot! I haven't thought about those in years!
"Belay that! ...Do something else!" ~ Hector Barbossa

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Sun Aug 10, 2008 11:42 am

Interestingly I have no memory of anyone reading to me ever.
I know one of my favorites as a child was called The Little Wooden Horse and I look on it with fond memories.

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Liz » Sun Aug 10, 2008 12:09 pm

suec wrote:I picked up the book again with a bit of reluctance, because the language is old-fashioned, but I was caught up in it very quickly. It rattles along at such a fast pace. I'll always enjoy reading that kind of book. I read other books as well, for different reasons. But that young-at heart type of book will always be a firm favourite.

The one chapter that I read I rather liked. I thought it an easy read and it kept my interest.

GG I don't remember anyone ever reading to me either. But I know that my mom must have. I just don't remember much before 3rd grade. The detailed memories don't kick in until 5th grade.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Aug 10, 2008 2:16 pm

Parlez, Pogo might not have been great literature but it was certainly wonderful social commentary. That was one for kids and adults! :cool:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby nebraska » Sun Aug 10, 2008 8:16 pm

Liz wrote:
nebraska wrote:I remember reading about Dick and Jane when I first learned to read - and Sally and Spot the dog and Puff the cat. It was a magical time for me, that first experience with being able to read! I think anyone who first learned to read with Dick and Jane would probably share that sense of wonder.

And look how much we as ONBC members share! Even though we are beyond that initial innocence, all the things we have shared over the years have created a real bond, I think!

Wow! I'm impressed. I don't remember that far back about reading. My first memories of reading are not good ones--and probably in 3rd or 4th grade. I remember the boring readers that we had to read in school, and then being tested on retention and comprehension and being told that I wasn't meeting expectations (although I'm sure it wasn't worded as politically correct as that back then). And then I remember telling the local librarian that I hated to read. Then I fast forward to sophomore year in high school when I did a 360 due to The Great Gatsby and Ethan Frome. Sorry to shock you guys like that. We all mature at different rates.


Liz, I don't remember much from my early childhood - in fact, if not for pictures, I wouldn't remember much of anything. But I clearly remember those Dick and Jane stories - that first experience reading a book must have really been important to me.

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby gemini » Sun Aug 10, 2008 8:59 pm

Reading everyones posts had me wondering how childhood reading affects whether you enjoy reading or not. Parlez, I loved Hawaii too and it got me to read several more of Michner's books. I think reading about Merlin as a child got me hooked on sci fi and fantasy and fiction. My parents both read but are not really into it. Like some of you, my dad is a big fan of the comics. My brother is an avid reader but only for research or education, never fiction. I read everything he reads plus my escape candy. I do have to admit that when I read fiction to escape it is more relaxing and that is how I read when I was a kid. I read research and heavy topics to learn but I never relax and just enjoy it for the fun of reading.
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Aug 10, 2008 9:02 pm

gemini, both of my children enjoyed reading when they were young. The younger one has kept it up much more than the older one has so I don't know. In fact the younger one is currently reading Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates. :cool:
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Wow! What a ride!

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby gemini » Sun Aug 10, 2008 9:09 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:gemini, both of my children enjoyed reading when they were young. The younger one has kept it up much more than the older one has so I don't know. In fact the younger one is currently reading Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates. :cool:

Well, I was an adult when I read FIHFHC but that is exactly the type of book I loved when I was young. Pure escapism!
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." Will Rogers



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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby nebraska » Sun Aug 10, 2008 10:13 pm

When my children were growing up I read to them every night. In fact, it was a serious punishment if they had done something bad enough to be deprived of their bedtime story. I like to think that special time together, sharing a book, influenced them to become good readers.


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