TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

by Arturo Perez-Reverte

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Gilbert's Girl
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Mon Aug 11, 2008 4:05 am

gemini wrote:Reading everyones posts had me wondering how childhood reading affects whether you enjoy reading or not. Parlez, I loved Hawaii too and it got me to read several more of Michner's books. I think reading about Merlin as a child got me hooked on sci fi and fantasy and fiction. My parents both read but are not really into it. Like some of you, my dad is a big fan of the comics. My brother is an avid reader but only for research or education, never fiction. I read everything he reads plus my escape candy. I do have to admit that when I read fiction to escape it is more relaxing and that is how I read when I was a kid. I read research and heavy topics to learn but I never relax and just enjoy it for the fun of reading.


I can remember the bookcases being filled with books mostly of my mothers, but I never recall her reading much although she does love it and has done much more since we left home. My father was and still is not a great reader. Some of my earliest memories though were going to library's with my mother so she obviously pushed me in the right direction although she never had any influence on what I read.
My children are extremely avid readers too although sometimes my eldest does not broaden his tastes beyond his Sci fi and fantasy . He did read The Dumas Club though while we were away after I finished it, because he had run out of books :lol:
My DH reads very heavy stuff as far as I am concerned and doesn't read novels of any sort. Lots of Philosophy and trying to understand the meaning of the universe etc. :-/

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Kittycat88 » Mon Aug 11, 2008 7:32 pm

Liz wrote:
nebraska wrote:I remember reading about Dick and Jane when I first learned to read - and Sally and Spot the dog and Puff the cat. It was a magical time for me, that first experience with being able to read! I think anyone who first learned to read with Dick and Jane would probably share that sense of wonder.

And look how much we as ONBC members share! Even though we are beyond that initial innocence, all the things we have shared over the years have created a real bond, I think!

Wow! I'm impressed. I don't remember that far back about reading. My first memories of reading are not good ones--and probably in 3rd or 4th grade. I remember the boring readers that we had to read in school, and then being tested on retention and comprehension and being told that I wasn't meeting expectations (although I'm sure it wasn't worded as politically correct as that back then). And then I remember telling the local librarian that I hated to read. Then I fast forward to sophomore year in high school when I did a 360 due to The Great Gatsby and Ethan Frome. Sorry to shock you guys like that. We all mature at different rates.


Hmmm. How can I say this. I am still about 90 pages shy of the end of the book. Honestly, I have to tell you, my fellow commenters, that literary level smart stuff, is over my head. I'm not saying I am dumb, but my brain worships the logical, the orderly. Anything that can be proved or disproved by phsyical science...I love the law and regulations and statutes and rules and boundries. But anyways, I have to admit I am not very bright when it comes to literature. I think some of the book went over my head. I found the book its own worst enemy...it kept throwing distractions at you, as if to keep you amused while the plot wandered around...but that is for a different thread maybe.

I quoted Nebraska up there because I remember my first day of reading class. I also learned from Dick and Jane. The first page showed Jane in a puddle or something and the first word I read was LOOK...the teacher said we could remember that word, because it had two eyes in the middle of the word.. :lol: and I never forgot that. I loved reading as a child. It was a companion, a parent, a friend, an escape. I have not read very erudite books, because I majored in history and thereby was allowed to skip most literature classes. I am not familiar with any great writers of fiction except mystery...PD James, Christie, everything else I read is non fiction or history. Biographies.

Mr. KC actually read Ulysses...(James Joyce) and he understands it...not me...no way.

I guess then my comment would be some us never get beyond those books that made us fall in love with reading, the melodramtic romances, the thrillers, anne frank and sylvia plath...because I never grew beyond them. I should be ashamed...but well, there you have it. I can't stand reading anything I dont viscerally like and most of the classics way over my head.
I have finally found a way to live just like I never could before.
I have finally found a way to live in the presence of the lord ~ E. Clapton

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Liz
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Liz » Mon Aug 11, 2008 7:44 pm

Kittycat88 wrote: I guess then my comment would be some us never get beyond those books that made us fall in love with reading, the melodramtic romances, the thrillers, anne frank and sylvia plath...because I never grew beyond them. I should be ashamed...but well, there you have it. I can't stand reading anything I dont viscerally like and most of the classics way over my head.

I think what matters is that you enjoy reading....whatever it may be. I don't think I will ever have the patience for Joyce. :yawn:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby Parlez » Mon Aug 11, 2008 8:40 pm

Booksellers say the same thing: it doesn't matter what people (especially young people) read as long as they're reading. Some people might argue with that, but, for the most part, I agree. I have faith in the evolutionary reader. Today's trash will lead to tomorrow's classic. If the love of reading is there, the sky's the limit.

And, Liz, in the catagory of intimidating authors, I never thought I could tackle Dumas either, let alone enjoy him. Maybe Joyce isn't as bad/hard as he seems...? :eyebrow:
"Belay that! ...Do something else!" ~ Hector Barbossa
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DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
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Re: TCD Question #5 - Dreaming

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Mon Aug 11, 2008 9:58 pm

I think reading material is such a personal choice and there is certainly enough out there for everyone. The point is to read and enjoy! :noodlemantra:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!


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