TCD Question #1 - Fiction

by Arturo Perez-Reverte

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Re: TCD Question #1 - Fiction

Unread postby Liz » Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:40 am

Gemini, thanks for providing more food for thought on this topic with your definitions. Parlez, you are making perfect sense to me. Angelina, I think you’ve hit upon something significant here—if it is not a “good novel” it may not be logical because it is not well thought out.

Great answers all around today, Noodlemantras!
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Re: TCD Question #1 - Fiction

Unread postby Parlez » Tue Aug 05, 2008 11:14 am

I went back to page 298 and read the whole passage in context. The preceding sentences (which I won't quote here for those who haven't gotten that far in the book) make the sentence in question make complete sense. It also supports the notion many have posted here about the author's logic being the final authority and the reader either has to go along with it or not. Which brings up, for me, the issue of context in TCD in general. I have to agree with magpie regarding the plot. I found it hard to follow and, more often, hard to swallow. But we'll be getting to that, right mods? :heart2:
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Re: TCD Question #1 - Fiction

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Tue Aug 05, 2008 11:41 am

I'm thinking you know us well, Parlez! ;-)
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Re: TCD Question #1 - Fiction

Unread postby stroch » Tue Aug 05, 2008 7:01 pm

I agree with Corso. Anything that is found in a published work of fiction is there for a reason, whether the story is fantasy or thinly disguised biography. The author and editor decide what to include, and what to leave out. The plot does not have to make logical, as in rational, sense, and does not have to be linear, but it follows the construct of the author's intention. once you postulate a scenario where people time travel, you build your world.

Your real life is subject to the will of others and vagaries of thousands of events.
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Re: TCD Question #1 - Fiction

Unread postby suec » Wed Aug 06, 2008 1:46 pm

Corso has shades of Rochester here, I think. Perhaps I should leave that comparison well alone for the time being. But they both have some interesting points to make about real life and the fictional one.
It seems to me that in both TCD and The Three Musketeers, characters at times behave in ways that are illogical (IMO). On the other hand, their actions are logical in terms of being useful plot devices or ways of being tools for the writer. So, I also agree with Corso here.
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Re: TCD Question #1 - Fiction

Unread postby Liz » Wed Aug 06, 2008 2:03 pm

suec wrote:It seems to me that in both TCD and The Three Musketeers, characters at times behave in ways that are illogical (IMO). On the other hand, their actions are logical in terms of being useful plot devices or ways of being tools for the writer. So, I also agree with Corso here.

I agree that they behaved very illogically!
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Re: TCD Question #1 - Fiction

Unread postby Parlez » Wed Aug 06, 2008 2:26 pm

I can't speak to The Three Musketeers since I haven't read it, but in The Viscomte de Bragelonne the characters (the same 3M ones) behaved perhaps illogically but very humanly, IMO. I was quite surprised by that, actually - how fallible, inconsistent, prone to pettiness, etc., they were. I always figured the 3Ms would behave in a manner that was close to perfection; the fact that they didn't made them all the more likeable to me. The imperfection of the protagonists was a main ingredient that kept me engaged in their story through all 600+ pages.
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