TDB&TB Question #16 ~ Memory

by Jean-Dominique Bauby

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gemini
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Unread postby gemini » Wed May 21, 2008 2:41 pm

Where was I yesterday? Hmmm. Missed this one. You ladies have covered this one pretty well without me. Nice insights.
What part do you think memory played in his story

Everything! Jean Do at this point was his memories. Sounds cruel, but I believe reliving them was what he enjoyed of life.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." Will Rogers

Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

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Unread postby Parlez » Wed May 21, 2008 3:40 pm

Liz wrote:
suec wrote: Whether his memory got him through or not... Well, he drew on his memory to dictate the book, not only in terms of providing subject matter, but also in preparing the dictation. I kind of feel that the book itself is what got him through, if anything. Memories are all very well, but it was in sharing them that Jean-Do was able to reach out to other human beings, to communicate with them: surely a vital component in life and a way to try to deal with the awful loneliness he felt. Also, writing about the memories, and his flights of fancy, helped to shape those experiences, to some extent, and make them concrete.


Good points! I agree that communicating those memories was more important than having the memories themselves.....and probably even more important to him than the average person because communication was such a challenge for him.

Agreed! It's crucial to be able to share your life story with others...particularly when such a catastrophy strikes so suddenly and you're not the person you were just a few short months ago. Being invited to share memories and past experiences helped Jean-Do reflect and gain new insights on his life before the stroke and also helped him gain a sense of self-worth afterwards. Without an attentive 'listening ear' I don't think he would have been able to rise to the challenge of trying to communicate (or cope) at all. Once that system for sharing his memories and observations, etc., was in place, he could truly take off and fly.
"Belay that! ...Do something else!" ~ Hector Barbossa
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Unread postby magpie » Wed May 21, 2008 4:00 pm

Liz wrote:
suec wrote: Whether his memory got him through or not... Well, he drew on his memory to dictate the book, not only in terms of providing subject matter, but also in preparing the dictation. I kind of feel that the book itself is what got him through, if anything. Memories are all very well, but it was in sharing them that Jean-Do was able to reach out to other human beings, to communicate with them: surely a vital component in life and a way to try to deal with the awful loneliness he felt. Also, writing about the memories, and his flights of fancy, helped to shape those experiences, to some extent, and make them concrete.


Good points! I agree that communicating those memories was more important than having the memories themselves.....and probably even more important to him than the average person because communication was such a challenge for him.


Yes, I felt that the book got him through--it was a goal to strive for each day. Communication was indeed a great challenge, but he was in the 'business' of communicating, so to speak, being in the media. Communication was his purpose, and his memory was a vital part of writing his book.
I'm having a thought here. . . .
. . if you simply try to tell the truth you will, nine times out of ten, become original without ever having noticed it.
--C.S. Lewis


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