TDB&TB Question #15 ~ Butterfly Hearing

by Jean-Dominique Bauby

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Parlez
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Unread postby Parlez » Mon Jun 02, 2008 11:45 pm

Liz wrote:

But youse guys may need the extra time, too. TCD is not a quick read. So the extra time might be a relief to some.[/color][/b]

No kidding! I just finished it, with underlining and highlighting and everything, and inspite of my best efforts to pay attention, I know I need to read it again! I can't imagine what the research for the tidbits is going to entail on this one...yikes! Among other things, there are so many references to strange books and characters and quotes and locations (all no doubt from classic literature, which I missed in my erstwhile education) I felt like I got a bit lost in translation...from Spanish to English to...what?!? :perplexed:
Then there's the whole occult thing...yikes again! :fear:
"Belay that! ...Do something else!" ~ Hector Barbossa
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nebraska
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Unread postby nebraska » Tue Jun 03, 2008 6:44 am

We have an accord.:bounce: I read and loved TCD several years ago but am reading it again now for our discussion here. It will be a relief to not have to rush to finish the book and maybe for once, when the tid bits start, I will be able to keep up with them,

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Unread postby suec » Tue Jun 03, 2008 4:17 pm

Ditto. I have read it a couple of times, but speed reading, so will have to read it again more thoroughly. I am really looking forward to the discussion because I have been curious for some time about everyone thinks of it. In the meantime, I've been indulging myself reading some more of his books, which I have enjoyed very much. And Liz and DIDHOT, take your time. I'm amazed at how you both get so much done here anyways. :cool:

Inthezone, I wouldn't trade my old lifestyle either, not with the inner peace coming with such a high price tag.Parlez, your question reminds me of Fierce Invalids and what Swiitters has to give up with not putting his feet on the ground for a while.
"Luck... inspiration... both only really happen to you when you empty your heart of ambition, purpose, and plan; when you give yourself, completely, to the golden, fate-filled moment."

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Parlez
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Unread postby Parlez » Tue Jun 03, 2008 4:41 pm

suec wrote:Ditto. I have read it a couple of times, but speed reading, so will have to read it again more thoroughly. I am really looking forward to the discussion because I have been curious for some time about everyone thinks of it. In the meantime, I've been indulging myself reading some more of his books, which I have enjoyed very much. And Liz and DIDHOT, take your time. I'm amazed at how you both get so much done here anyways. :cool:

Inthezone, I wouldn't trade my old lifestyle either, not with the inner peace coming with such a high price tag.Parlez, your question reminds me of Fierce Invalids and what Swiitters has to give up with not putting his feet on the ground for a while.

That's interesting, suec ~ I just picked up a copy of Purity of Blood, by Perez-Reverte, and I can't put it down. Which title/s would you recommend I read next? And, in a bit of six degrees of separation, Viggo Mortensen (my other guy) recently completed the film, "Alatriste", based on the character in many of Perez-Reverte's books. It was filmed in Spain, in Spanish, and I don't know if/when it will be distributed here in the States. But now that I know the same guy authored books that turned into movie projects for both JD and VM, I'm bound to become a big fan. :heart2:

As far as the price tag for inner peace goes, if all I had to do was keep my feet off the ground for a while and make outrageous tongue-in-cheek remarks like Switzer, whilst wearing sassy white linen and a Panama hat, I'd do it! :thumbsup:
"Belay that! ...Do something else!" ~ Hector Barbossa

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Unread postby suec » Tue Jun 03, 2008 7:00 pm

Parlez, Purity of Blood sounds like a must -read! Thanks for your comment about that - I was wondering which one to read next and it looks like you've answered that for me. :cool: So far, I've read The Seville Communion and The Flanders Panel. Of the two, I preferred The Flanders Panel. Reasons being The Seville Communion switches narratives quite a bit at the start and I personally find that harder to get into, and TFP is more similar to TCD in some ways. It'll be interesting to see how it compares to A Purity of Blood.
Viggo - - :drool: And I thought he was very good in A History of Violence. I'm getting very drawn to this author also, although by a different route. One factor is I've realised I've been to the town where he was born and really liked it there actually - that kind of odd "connection" is a plus.

As far as the price tag for inner peace goes, if all I had to do was keep my feet off the ground for a while and make outrageous tongue-in-cheek remarks like Switzer, whilst wearing sassy white linen and a Panama hat, I'd do it!


He was pretty outrageous :lol:
"Luck... inspiration... both only really happen to you when you empty your heart of ambition, purpose, and plan; when you give yourself, completely, to the golden, fate-filled moment."

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Tue Jun 03, 2008 9:37 pm

I am enjoying TCD but there is a lot to pay attention to! The tidbits could last a year. :lol:

Real life is claiming most of my attention at the moment but it sure is nice to have a book to escape into when I can!

I'm sure several viewings of TNG will be necessary! :popcorn:

Thank you all for your patience.
:bouquet:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!


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