TDB&TB Question #9 ~ TV Watching

by Jean-Dominique Bauby

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Inthezone
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Unread postby Inthezone » Wed May 14, 2008 10:11 am

Parlez: You realized no matter how hard you work or how devoted you are, the need is not going to go away. That can lead to frustration and guilt and fear = stress! Boundaries are definitely called for.


No doubt a contributory reason for the marked deficit in trained healthcare workers and definitely the reason I had to move on. We internalize all the guilt and suffering we see every day and it leads to burnout ... I can in part contribute my hypertension to this. :banghead:
"For certain you must be lost to find the place what can't be found. Elseways everyone would know where it was." ~ Hector Barbossa

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Unread postby Parlez » Wed May 14, 2008 11:21 am

Sorry to hear that, Inthezone. :hug:
The good news is - things are changing (I hope)! In fact, I'm leaving this morning to attend a conference in Portland put on by the Pioneer Network (www.pioneernetwork.net), an organization of health care providers who are dedicated to shifting the paradigm for how we care for the elderly in this country.
Kind of ironic, innit! I guess that's why I'm on the soapbox :soapbox: this morning!
"Belay that! ...Do something else!" ~ Hector Barbossa
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Unread postby Inthezone » Wed May 14, 2008 11:48 am

Parlez wrote:Sorry to hear that, Inthezone. :hug:
The good news is - things are changing (I hope)! In fact, I'm leaving this morning to attend a conference in Portland put on by the Pioneer Network (www.pioneernetwork.net), an organization of health care providers who are dedicated to shifting the paradigm for how we care for the elderly in this country.
Kind of ironic, innit! I guess that's why I'm on the soapbox :soapbox: this morning!


Thanks for that! :hug:

That is a mighty task - changing the face of healthcare -- daunting to say the least... but entirely necessary.

I hope your conference is enlightening and helpful to you.
"For certain you must be lost to find the place what can't be found. Elseways everyone would know where it was." ~ Hector Barbossa

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Unread postby Liz » Wed May 14, 2008 11:51 am

teacher wrote:The helplessness of his situation is devastating, but despite not having the ability to choose, I see the TV as a bit of a help, actually - having Animal Planet or Discovery or whatever on, even without the sound is probably some distraction and maybe even a bit of entertainment. I'm imagining it would be even more monotone and depressive if he had had to be in a hospital, say 60-70 years ago - just him and the walls.

Very good point, Teacher. I don’t watch a whole lot of TV, like I used to. But that is because I have other things I would rather do, which would not be a possibility if I was in Jean-Do’s condition. The TV would be a life saver to me…..maybe the only thing to keep me afloat.

Inthezone wrote:I can't add much else for this discussion other than to reiterate something I've already read here. When you have a family member in the hospital, you must be there almost around the clock to be an advocate for their care. Especially when they cannot speak for themselves or are too sick to make demands.

Well, this is good to know, just in case I need to know it at sometime in the future. I know that there’s a good chance I wouldn’t be here right now having this discussion if my mom hadn’t noticed that I was hemorrhaging after my tonsillectomy when I was 4.

Parlez wrote:The good news is - things are changing (I hope)! In fact, I'm leaving this morning to attend a conference in Portland put on by the Pioneer Network (www.pioneernetwork.net), an organization of health care providers who are dedicated to shifting the paradigm for how we care for the elderly in this country.

I look forward to your sharing any information you get from that conference that might relate to our discussion.

nebraska wrote: I would like to add that in the USA, we need to remember the role insurance coverage has played in all of this. bang head Financial difficulties are reality, staff cuts, pay rates, etc.

Don't get me started. :mad:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby fansmom » Wed May 14, 2008 6:44 pm

Liz wrote: I know that there’s a good chance I wouldn’t be here right now having this discussion if my mom hadn’t noticed that I was hemorrhaging after my tonsillectomy when I was 4.
Wow, Liz! I'm glad she noticed!

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Wed May 14, 2008 7:47 pm

Parlez, what you said about a staff member walking right by someone who is trying to get their attention was something I witnessed myself last fall when I was visiting my uncle in a nursing home. There was the most wonderful elderly couple that lived there. They were easily into their 90's. They were both in wheel chairs and the wife seemed rather unresponsive. The husband appeared to be unable to speak but was sitting upright in his chair, attending to his wife, rearranging her blanket, etc. He was a most dapper fellow with a white hat and a jacket on. An attendant walked by and he tried to signal her, you could tell it was quite an effort and she just kep walking. You could see the frustration in his face. Another man, who appeared to be a stroke victim, was sitting in his wheelchair watching the world go by when an attendant came up behind his chair to wheel him elsewhere. She walked up behind him without a word and turned his chair. It scared him to no end! She could easily have said a word to him or let him know she was there before she just jerked his chair from behind. But, having said that, I also met some of the nicest most caring people that worked there as well. It's a very tough job and I admire anyone who can do it day in and day out!
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Unread postby Liz » Wed May 14, 2008 7:57 pm

fansmom wrote:
Liz wrote: I know that there’s a good chance I wouldn’t be here right now having this discussion if my mom hadn’t noticed that I was hemorrhaging after my tonsillectomy when I was 4.
Wow, Liz! I'm glad she noticed!


Me too.
:baby:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby nebraska » Sat May 17, 2008 11:15 am

Yesterday I had lunch with a friend who as a 40-ish mother of 3 is going to nursing school. During our conversation, this book club discussion came up and she told me that she had to read the book as part of her course study and write a paper on it. I think that is a really good example of how Jean-Do's legacy will go on and on.

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Liz
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Unread postby Liz » Sat May 17, 2008 1:08 pm

nebraska wrote:Yesterday I had lunch with a friend who as a 40-ish mother of 3 is going to nursing school. During our conversation, this book club discussion came up and she told me that she had to read the book as part of her course study and write a paper on it. I think that is a really good example of how Jean-Do's legacy will go on and on.

And kudos to that nursing school for making it required reading. :hatsoff:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.


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