Public Enemies Tidbit #20 ~ Wisconsin

by Bryan Burrough

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Public Enemies Tidbit #20 ~ Wisconsin

Unread postby Liz » Sat Feb 02, 2008 4:54 pm

I am really late in posting this today :blush: , but sometimes things happen for a reason (see below)....

Wisconsin map (again the red dots indicate the significant locations):



Emma posted yesterday from Baraboo News Republic:

While scouts choose locations for filming, others on Mann's team will conduct a casting call for Depression-era vehicles to appear in the movie. Filmmakers want people with antique cars, trucks and buses from 1930 to 1935 to bring them, or pictures of them, to Milwaukee's Miller Park on Sunday between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. About 45 people turned out for a recent vehicle call in Madison, although nearly all just brought pictures of their vehicles due to road conditions.

And just added a few minutes ago due to Emma’s most recent post will be Richland Center at the end of this piece. The news clip she posted:



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MILWAUKEE

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Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin and 22nd largest (by population) in the United States. The city is the county seat of Milwaukee County and is located on the southwestern shore of Lake Michigan. As of the 2006 U.S. Census estimate, Milwaukee had a population of 602,782. The city is the main cultural and economic center of the Milwaukee–Racine–Waukesha Metropolitan Area with a population of 1,773,519.

The first Europeans to pass through the area were French missionaries and fur traders. In 1818, the French-Canadian explorer Solomon Juneau settled in the area, and in 1846 Juneau's town combined with two neighboring towns to incorporate as the City of Milwaukee. Large numbers of German and other immigrants helped increase the city's population during the 1840s and the following decades.

Once known almost exclusively as a brewing and manufacturing powerhouse, Milwaukee has taken steps in recent years to reshape its image. In the past decade, major new additions to the city have included the Milwaukee Riverwalk, the Midwest Airlines Center, Miller Park, an internationally renowned addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum, and Pier Wisconsin, as well as major renovations to the Milwaukee Auditorium and U.S. Cellular Arena. In addition, many new skyscrapers, condos, lofts, and apartments have been constructed in neighborhoods on and near the lakefront and riverbanks for the purpose of attracting new residents to the city.

Milwaukee's Name

The name "Milwaukee" comes from an Algonquian word Millioke, meaning either "Good/Beautiful/Pleasant Land" (c.f. Potawatomi language minwaking, Ojibwe language ominowakiing) or "Gathering place [by the water]" (c.f. Potawatomi language manwaking, Ojibwe language omaniwakiing). Early explorers called the Milwaukee River and surrounding lands various names: Melleorki, Milwacky, Mahn-a-waukie, Milwarck, and Milwaucki. For many years, printed records gave the name as "Milwaukie". A Short History of Milwaukee, by William George Bruce, gives the story of Milwaukee's final name:

"[O]ne day during the thirties of the last century [1800s] a newspaper calmly changed the name to Milwaukee, and Milwaukee it has remained until this day."

The spelling "Milwaukie" lives on in Milwaukie, Oregon, named after the Wisconsin city in 1847, before the current spelling was universally accepted.

History

Milwaukee has three "founding fathers," of whom French Canadian Solomon Juneau was first to come to the area, in 1818. The Juneaus founded the town called Juneau's Side, or Juneautown, that began attracting more settlers. However, Byron Kilbourn was Juneau's equivalent on the west side of the Milwaukee River. In competition with Juneau, he established Kilbourntown west of the Milwaukee River, and made sure that the streets running toward the river did not join with those on the east side. This accounts for the large number of angled bridges that still exist in Milwaukee today. Further, Kilbourn distributed maps of the area which only showed Kilbourntown, implying that Juneautown did not exist or that the east side of the river was uninhabited and thus undesirable. The third prominent builder was George H. Walker. He claimed land to the south of the Milwaukee River, along with Juneautown, where he built a log house in 1834. This area grew and became known as Walker's Point.

By the 1840s, the three towns had grown quite a bit, along with their rivalries. The 1840s brought on some intense battles between the towns, mainly Juneautown and Kilbourntown, which culminated with the Milwaukee Bridge War of 1845. Following the Bridge War, it was decided that the best course of action was to officially unite the towns. So on January 31, 1846 they combined to incorporate as the City of Milwaukee and elected L. Solomon Juneau as Milwaukee's first mayor. A great number of German immigrants had helped increase the city's population during the 1840s and continued to migrate to the area during the following decades. Milwaukee has even been called "Deutsches Athen" (German Athens), and into the twentieth century, there were more German speakers and German-language newspapers than there were English speakers and English-language newspapers in the city.

During the middle and late 19th century, Wisconsin and the Milwaukee area became the final destination of many German immigrants fleeing the Revolution of 1848 in the various small German states and Austria. In Wisconsin they found the inexpensive land and the freedoms they sought. The German heritage and influence in the Milwaukee area is widespread. In addition to Germans, Milwaukee saw large influxes of immigrants from Poland, Italy, Ireland, and Central and Eastern Europe. By 1910, Milwaukee (along with New York City) shared the distinction of having the largest percentage of foreign-born residents in the United States.

During the first half of the twentieth century, Milwaukee was the hub of the socialist movement in the United States. Milwaukee elected three socialist mayors during this time: Emil Seidel (1910-1912), Daniel Hoan (1916-1940), and Frank Zeidler (1948-1960). It remains the only major city in the country to have done so. Often referred to as "Sewer Socialists," the Milwaukee socialists were characterized by their practical approach to government and labor. Also during this time, a small but burgeoning community of African Americans who emigrated from the south formed a community that would come to be known as Bronzeville.

Milwaukee continued to grow tremendously until the late 1950s. Milwaukee was home to immigrants from Ireland, Germany, Hungary, Poland and other central European nations. There was also great northward migration of African Americans from the Southern United States. With the large influx of immigrants, Milwaukee became one of the 15 largest cities in the nation, and by the mid-1960s, its population reached nearly 750,000. Starting in the late 1960s, however, Milwaukee, like many cities in the "rust belt," saw its population start to decline due to various factors, including the loss of blue collar jobs and the phenomenon of "white flight." Nevertheless, in recent years the city has begun to make strides in improving its economy, neighborhoods, and image, resulting in the revitalization of neighborhoods such as the Historic Third Ward, the East Side, and more recently, Bay View, along with attracting new businesses to its downtown area. The city continues to make plans for increasing its future revitalization through various projects. Largely due to its efforts to preserve its history, in 2006 Milwaukee was named one of the "Dozen Distinctive Destinations" by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. In 2007, the Census Bureau released revised population numbers for Milwaukee, that showed the city gained population between 2000 and 2006. This marked the first period of positive population growth since the 1960s.

Climate

Milwaukee's proximity to Lake Michigan causes a convection current to form mid-afternoon, resulting in the so-called lake effect, causing the temperatures to be warmer in the winter than regions farther from the lake, and cooler in the summer. "Cooler near the lake" is practically boilerplate language for local meteorologists during the spring and summer. Some local stations began tagging CNTL (Cooler Near The Lake) onto their weekly forecasts. Also, more snow falls in Milwaukee than surrounding areas, due to the lake effect. The lake causes relative humidity in the summer that is far higher than that of comparable cities at the same latitude, meaning that it feels hotter than the actual temperature.

Brewing

Milwaukee was once the home to four of the world's largest breweries (Schlitz, Blatz, Pabst, and Miller), and was the number one beer producing city in the world for many years. Despite the decline in its position as the world's leading beer producer after the loss of three of those breweries, its one remaining major brewery, Miller Brewing Company, remains a key employer by employing over 1,700 of the city's workers. Due to Miller's solid position as the second-largest beer-maker in the U.S., as well as basing its world headquarters in Milwaukee, the city remains known as a beer town despite now only representing a fraction of its economy. The historic Milwaukee Brewery, located in "Miller Valley" at 4000 West State Street, is the oldest still-functioning major brewery in the United States.

Besides Miller, the only other currently operating stand-alone brewery in Milwaukee is Lakefront Brewery, a microbrew located in Riverwest. The suburb of Glendale is home to Sprecher Brewery, another locally popular microbrew. Various brewpubs can also be found throughout the Milwaukee area.

Museums

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The Milwaukee Art Museum

Milwaukee's most visually prominent cultural attraction is the Milwaukee Art Museum, especially its new $100 million wing designed by Santiago Calatrava in his first American commission. The museum includes a "brise soleil," a moving sunscreen that unfolds like the wing of a bird. Milwaukee is also home to the America's Black Holocaust Museum. Founded by lynching survivor James Cameron, the museum features exhibits which chronicle the injustices suffered throughout history by African Americans in the United States.

The Milwaukee Brewers

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Miller Park, home of the Milwaukee Brewers, opened in 2001.

The Milwaukee Brewers are a Major League Baseball team based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. They are in the Central Division of the National League. The team began in Seattle, Washington for one season before changing names and moving to Milwaukee. The Brewers were part of the American League from their creation as an expansion club in 1969 through the 1997 season, after which they switched to the National League.

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Undoubtedly, Miller Park's most unique feature is the roof. The only fan-shaped convertible roof in North America guarantees perfect conditions for every game. The 12,000-ton, seven-panel roof opens and closes almost silently in just 10 minutes.

Three panels, each as big as the roof over the Bradley Center in downtown Milwaukee, move over a fixed panel on the third base side. Two more panels move over a fixed panel on the first base side. The roof panels pivot on a fixed point behind home plate, and are each powered by a 60-horsepower engine, or "bogey," that moves along a semi-circular rail system, or "track beam," about 150-feet above the exterior outfield wall.

Inside, the roof reaches 200 feet above the playing field. Outside, the highest arch towers 30 stories, the newest fixture in Milwaukee's skyline.



RACINE

Pg. 162:

Racine, Wisconsin
Monday, November 20
2:30 P.M.

The numbing cold front had moved on, but as the five gang members
(the Dillinger Gang) cruised toward the American Bank and Trust Company, a cool wind was still blowing off Lake Michigan behind the bank.


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Racine is a city in Racine County, Wisconsin, located beside Lake Michigan at the mouth of the Root River. As of the 2006 census, the city had a total population of 79,592.[3] It is the county seat of Racine County.

History

On October 10, 1699, a fleet of eight canoes bearing a party of French explorers entered the mouth of Root River. These were the first known white men to visit what is now Racine County. They founded a French trading post in the area which eventually became a small settlement on Lake Michigan near where the Root River empties into Lake Michigan. That is why Racine has a French name: "racine" means "root" in the French language.

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The mouth of the Root River, Racine, Wisconsin

Before the American Civil War, Racine was well known for its strong opposition to slavery. Many slaves escaping to freedom via the Underground Railroad passed through the city. In 1854 Joshua Glover, an escaped slave who had made a home in Racine, was arrested by federal marshals and taken to a jail in Milwaukee. One hundred men from Racine, and ultimately 5,000 Wisconsinites, rallied and broke into the jail to free him. He was helped to escape to Canada. Glover's rescue gave rise to many legal complications and a great deal of litigation. This eventually lead to the Wisconsin Supreme Court declaring the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 unconstitutional, and later, the Wisconsin State Legislature refusing to recognize the authority of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Waves of immigrants, including Danes, Germans, and Czechs began to settle in Racine between the Civil War and the First World War. African Americans started arriving in large numbers during World War I, as they did in other Midwestern industrial towns, and Mexicans started migrating to Racine from roughly 1925 onward.

Racine was a factory town almost from the very beginning. The first industry in Racine County included the manufacture of Fanning mills, machines that separated wheat grain from chaff. Racine also had its share of captains of industry, including J. I. Case (heavy equipment), S.C. Johnson (cleaning and chemical products), Secor, and many others, including shipping. Racine's harbor was very central to the shipping industry in the late 1800's.

In 1887, malted milk was invented by Englishman William Horlick in Racine, and Horlicks remains a global brand. The garbage disposal was invented in 1927 by architect John Hammes of Racine. He founded the company InSinkErator in Racine, which still produces millions of garbage disposers a year. In addition, Racine is the home of Johnson Wax, with its headquarters designed in 1936 by Frank Lloyd Wright, who also designed the Wingspread Conference Center and two homes in Racine. The city is also home to the Dremel Corporation as well as Twin Disc.

Racine claims to be the largest North American settlement of Danes outside of Greenland. Racine is particularly known for its Danish pastries, especially kringle. Several bakeries have been featured on Food Network.



LITTLE BOHEMIA

Pg. 300-322:

The first family of the Manitowish area was the LaPortes. The elder daughter, Ruth, married a Milwaukee printer named Henry Voss, who began building tourist cabins in 1912. In 1928 the Vosses completed the area’s premier resort, the grand Birchwood Lodge on Route 51, which boasted a modern kitchen, a lavish dining room overlooking Spider Lake and a roaring fire in its great lobby hearth. There were three LaPorte boys: Lloyd, a fishing guide; lean, stoic George, who ran the grocery store; and the black sheep, Louis, a bootlegger who kept two stills running on Grants Lake all through the Depression.

The younger daughter, Nan, transported her brother’s moonshine downstate, selling it to speakeasies there. In Racine, Nan met Emil Wanatka, a squat, gregarious Austro-Hungarian restaurateur. The two married and moved to Chicago, where they ran a rough little bar, a favorite of underworld figures, called Little Bohemia. In 1926 the Wanatkas returned to Manitowish and Emial bought land on Star Lake, just up from Birchwood Lodge, for a lodge of his own, a new Little Bohemia, completed in 1931……

At one point Nan’s sister Ruth brought her daughter over from Birchwood Lodge to chat. Dillinger asked Wanatka who they were, then bought them drinks. Ruth’s daughter asked why the nice man had hair a different color from his eyebrows. The women hushed her.



MANITOWISH WATERS


Map (note the purple dots):



Manitowish Waters, Wisconsin is truly a vacation paradise in Wisconsin's Northwoods.

The Lake Superior Chippewa Indians were the first people to have an impact on this beautiful area. Establishing a camp on the east shore of Manitowish Lake, they made sugar, fished, raised corn, picked berries and buried their dead in the area.

In 1860, government officials established township boundaries and noticed the valuable timber resources and chain of lakes convenient for floating logs to sawmills. By 1884, canoe flotillas looking for timber had established the first white settlements in what is now Manitowish Waters, and in 1887-1888 the dam was built to hold chain waters for logging and river driving.

In 1927, the Town of Spider Lake was officially established; it was renamed Manitowish Waters in 1940. Then, in 1946, cranberry farming began around Wild Rice Lake, establishing what is now one of Manitowish Waters' largest businesses.

Today, the Manitowish Waters area is the ideal spot to "get away from it all." Located in Northwestern Vilas County in Wisconsin's Northwoods, Manitowish Waters is known for its quiet, less stressful surroundings perfect for a family vacation, reunion, romantic getaway, hunting or fishing excursion, or leisure day trip (or gangster hideout?). With a year 'round population of roughly 670, Manitowish Waters sees quite an increase throughout the seasons from a combination of seasonal residents, second home owners and vacationers.

The area takes pride in offering a fantastic selection of first class restaurants with unique cuisine choices to satisfy every taste. Whatever your preference, relax in a bed & breakfast, American Plan, resort cottage, private home, motel or campground. Quaint shops invite you to browse for special gifts, distinctive clothing, intricate original artwork, Northwoods decor, something for the kids or cranberry-related items. All the conveniences of home are also available to make your stay complete.



LITTLE BOHEMIA LODGE

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The sign on Hwy 51

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Little Bohemia Lodge offers visitors a chance to dine among friends in the heart of Manitowish Waters, on Little Star Lake. Known for excellent food and memorable times since the 1920's, the lodge was the famous hideout of John Dillinger & Baby Face Nelson. Serving nightly 'til 10 p.m., lunch seasonally. (715) 543-2305


I want to know if there are any of you out there who have gone here to eat. Referred to as “Little Bo” on their website, Little Bohemia Lodge is now just a restaurant. However, according to the quite helpful woman at the Manitowish Waters Chamber of Commerce, there is a chalet for lodging that was added on to the property years later. It is called Adorable Chalet on Little Star Lake. A worker at LBL told me that he doesn’t think it is being rented out anymore, but has left a message for the manager to call me. I asked both of these folks about the possibility of shooting here. The woman at the chamber said that they were contacted a couple of years ago when the movie was in different hands, but she doesn’t know of anything coming through her office this go around. The man I talked to at LBL indicated that there had been some contact, but nothing definite. He made it sound like it could go either way, at this point.

LBL Menu:



Satellite Map of Little Bohemia:



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The entrance, 1950s

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Little Bohemia Lodge, 1934

and

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The rear of the Lodge

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The way they escaped

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Today

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Dillinger and Emil Wanatka

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Nan Wanatka

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The Dining Room Today

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The Bar Today

and

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Dillinger artifacts on display at Little Bohemia Lodge:

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VOSS's BIRCHWOOD LODGE


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Voss’s Birchwood Lodge is still in existence but makes no mention of Dillinger, Nat or its hosting the FBI on their website even though there is a long history page. Daughter, Audrey, is still at the helm of the Birchwood. I guess she doesn’t want to remember the nice man with hair a different color than his eyebrows.

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1934

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Today


LAC DU FLAMBEAU INDIAN RESERVATION


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Pg. 327 & 332:

Lac Du Flambeau Indian Reservation, Wisconsin
2:00 P.M.

Outside a tarpaper shack deep in the north woods, a fifteen-year-old girl named Dorothy Schroeder was pinning up clothes to dry when she saw the man tromping through the brush toward her…..”Can I buy a cup of coffee?” Baby Face Nelson asked.


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1933

The Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa are an Ojibwa Native American tribe, with an Indian reservation lying mostly in the Town of Lac du Flambeau in southwestern Vilas County, and in the Town of Sherman in southeastern Iron County in the state of Wisconsin. The Lac du Flambeau Indian Reservation has a land area of 108.065 sq miles and a 2000 census resident population of 2,995 persons. Its major settlement is the unincorporated census-designated place of Lac du Flambeau, which had a population of 1,646 persons.

Located at Waaswaagani-zaaga'igan and translated into French as Lac du Flambeau (Torch Lake), the Reservation of the Lac du Flambeau Band, called Waaswaaganing in Ojibwe, was established under the Treaty of 1854.

For centuries, Waaswaagani-zaaga'igan served as the trade hub connecting the waterways between Lake Superior (via Montreal River) and Wisconsin River and Flambeau River.

Being signatories to the 1837, 1842 and 1854 Treaties, Lac du Flambeau Band enjoys traditional hunting, fishing and gathering practices guaranteed in these treaties.

Lac du Flambeau is the location of sacred Strawberry Island "the place of the little people," which is recognized by the National Register of Historical Places. This island is the place where the last battle between the Sioux and the Ojibwe was fought in 1745. In 1966, the island was identified through an archeological survey as a place with artifacts and remains dating back to 200 B.C.

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LAKE GENEVA


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Pg. 471-483: Luck was with them: without hesitation the deputy identified the resort town of Lake Geneva, where there was a character named Eddie Duffy who ran errands for the Lake Como Inn—an inn agents had inspected the previous summer after finding one of its pillow cases in Tommy Carroll’s luggage……If Nelson returned to Lake Geneva for the winter, they would be waiting.


Some Interesting Facts About Lake Geneva:

• The city is Lake Geneva, the lake is Geneva Lake.
• Population: 7,148
• Popular with tourists from metropolitan Chicago and Milwaukee.
• An elephant was buried in Delavan Lake during the city's days as a winter home for circus troupes.
• At the bottom of Geneva Lake you can find: a 50's era cabin cruiser south of Black Point, a Nash over by Cedar Point, a Volkswagen North of the Academy, the Lucius Newberry by Geneva Bay Estates, and the Hull of the Lady of the Lake by Geneva Inn.
• Geneva Lake is the second deepest lake in Wisconsin (5,262 acres, 135 feet deep, 21 miles around, 2.1 miles wide, and 7.6 miles long).
• Was a haven for Al Capone and other mobsters.
• Lake Geneva was the home of Sidney Smith , creator of the Andy Gump comic strip. A statue of Andy Gump stands in Flat Iron Park.
• The Geneva Lake area is the home of Buddy Melges, 1972 Olympic yachting gold medallist and helmsman of the winning America's Cup team in 1992.
• Producers/creators William Bell and Lee Phillips developed the soap opera "The Young and the Restless" while living in Lake Geneva, and set the popular daytime drama in the nearby town of Genoa City.
• The famed "Dungeons & Dragons ® Role-playing Game" was founded in Lake Geneva. "Dungeons & Dragon's" is a registered trademark of TSR, Inc.
• The home of Joseph Philbrick Webster, who wrote the famous Civil War camp song "Lorena" and the popular hymn "The Sweet By and By" is in Elkhorn and now the Webster House Museum.
• Folklore is that over 70 species of evergreen trees are planted on Black Point.
• Hugh Hefner chose Lake Geneva as the home for the nationally acclaimed Playboy Club & Resort. Now the Grand Geneva Resort & Spa.
• Guns N' Roses lead singer, Axl Rose owned property on the southwest side of Lake Geneva from 1988 until 1998.
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LAKE COMO INN


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The site refers to it as Lake Como Hotel. But when I questioned the French Country Inn yesterday they said it was also referred to as Lake Como Inn.

From the French Country Inn website:


The Lake Geneva You Never Knew
by Sharyn Alden, Madison Magazine

Everyone's familiar to some extent with the Geneva Lakes area. But you may not know one of my favorite getaways - The French Country Inn, a fine water's edge restaurant, lodge and former gangster getaway.
Back in the 1920s, dapper Chicago gangsters, including "Scarface" Capone, George "Bugs" Moran, Jack "Machine Gun" McGurn and John Dillinger, drove north for their rest and relaxation, away from the pressures of Prohibition. One of the hideaway retreats was the Lake Como Hotel, now The French Country Inn. Locals tell stories about an underground speakeasy called the Sewer, and the secret tunnels that connected to the building for fast getaways. That hideaway feeling is still evident. Practically invisible from the street, the only way in is via a narrow wooded road.

In 1986 the resort was purchased by the Navilio family, who completely revamped it and gave it an elegant European flavor. The main guesthouse was shipped from Denmark at the turn of the century and is a masterpiece of Danish craftsmanship. It originally was showcased at the Chicago World's Fair in 1893. The 33-room inn has lovely accommodations all in the name of pampering.

Kirsch's, the inn's smartly appointed restaurant, offers award-winning dinner entrees, including chateaubriand and Chilean sea bass. The restaurant also puts on a wonderful brunch. Reservations recommended. For more information, call The French Country Inn at (262) 245-5220.


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Lake Como Inn 1930s

The French Country Inn today:

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RICHLAND CENTER

Richland Center is a city in Richland County, Wisconsin. The population was 5,114 at the 2000 census.

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Main Street

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Richland Center in the Fall



Sources:

City of Richland Center
Geneva Lake Area Chamber of Commerce &
Lake Geneva Area Convention and Visitors Bureau
Little Bohemia Lodge
Manitowish Waters Chamber of Commerce
Milwaukee Brewers
The French Country Inn
Voss’s Birchwood Lodge
Wikipedia
http://www.geocities.com/jdillinger34/index.html
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby fansmom » Sat Feb 02, 2008 7:41 pm

Thanks! Again, excellent work!
I like the LBL menu, which lists a 1/2 pound burger under "Lighter Fare." :lol:

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sat Feb 02, 2008 7:44 pm

The Milwaukee Art Museum is really interesting architecture. I'd love to see the inside. I would also love to take a trip to the Little Bohemia Lodge and see those artifiacts. I suspect their business just might pick up in the near future. Richland Center looks perfect, almost stuck in time. You can just picture cars from the 30's along those streets.
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Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby Barb7472 » Sat Feb 02, 2008 9:39 pm

I cannot tell you how excited I am that Johnny may be coming to Milwaukee! Who would ever think Hollywood would come to sleepy Wisconsin? Must be those new tax breaks!! The one thing I wonder about..in March, we are usually still in winter mode. We can get snowstorms into May.

By the way, I live in Franklin, just 15 minutes SW of Milwaukee.

Also..the art museum is unique. I'll bet Johnny would love to see it, and I would be happy to show it to him!!

Keep your fingers crossed that maybe I could finally get to meet Mr. Depp!!
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sat Feb 02, 2008 9:43 pm

Hi, Barb7472 and welcome to ONBC! :welcome: Good luck to you on that meet up and museum tour... ;-) I think it's great that so many of our Midwestern Zoners might get their chance! :hope:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby Barb7472 » Sat Feb 02, 2008 11:16 pm

Thanks! Does anyone know of the best way to find out when and where they might be filming? One of my Johnny friends suggested Variety magazine.
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Unread postby Lady Jill » Sat Feb 02, 2008 11:28 pm

Wow! 20 Tidbits and I just read my second! I don't know whether to read the book or read these great tidbits!
Loved the LBL menu! Ha! It's dinnertime for me in Nevada! I'll bet if Johnny is anywhere near this place he'll somehow be eating there! I sure can identify with his love of history and old things.
Thanks so much Liz. . .
back to dinner and the book!
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Unread postby Liz » Sat Feb 02, 2008 11:56 pm

Lady Jill, I wonder if we'll be hearing about one of his favorite dishes (like the sticky toffee pudding). I know what I’d have if I ever had the pleasure to dine there (which seems VERY appealing right about now)….

The Escargot and the Canadian Walleye—the escargot because I love escargot and not many restaurants serve it, and the Walleye because I have never heard of it before this tidbit—which is always tempting to me.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

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Unread postby Liz » Sun Feb 03, 2008 12:04 am

Barb7472, glad to see you here at ONBC. :welcome: I'm hoping you get to meet Mr. Depp. I have to tell you that I think this is my favorite state on this tour. I find it quite beautiful and fascinating. And I would love to go to your art museum one day.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

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Unread postby Lady Jill » Sun Feb 03, 2008 12:24 am

Liz wrote:Lady Jill, I wonder if we'll be hearing about one of his favorite dishes (like the sticky toffee pudding). I know what I’d have if I ever had the pleasure to dine there (which seems VERY appealing right about now)….

The Escargot and the Canadian Walleye—the escargot because I love escargot and not many restaurants serve it, and the Walleye because I have never heard of it before this tidbit—which is always tempting to me.


Liz, I missed the desserts. Dillenger's Rockerfeller is what caught my eye!
Ha! still haven't had dinner. I love garlic. .and fish.
" After we're gone, the only thing that matters is the love we left behind."

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Unread postby Barb7472 » Sun Feb 03, 2008 12:36 am

Liz wrote:Barb7472, glad to see you here at ONBC. :welcome: I'm hoping you get to meet Mr. Depp. I have to tell you that I think this is my favorite state on this tour. I find it quite beautiful and fascinating. And I would love to go to your art museum one day.


Thanks! I've actually been a lurker for a while. It seems that by the time I get to reading the topic, the conversations have been over for hours! I do appreciate the hard work that the ladies do here. I know this is a class place, and I was thrilled for you when I found out that Johnny may be a lurker here too! He really should endorse The Zone as his official fan club! I know he doesn't want that kind of thing, but wouldn't it be wonderful?

Barb
Barb7472

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DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Feb 03, 2008 1:43 am

Barb7472, welcome from lurkdom! I hope you will join us for the discussion. As far as finding out about locations, I would keep a weather eye on the Zone as one source. The Zone sleuths seem to do a pretty good job in that regard. Also watch local reports if you are in any of the areas being considered.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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fansmom
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Unread postby fansmom » Sun Feb 03, 2008 5:08 pm

Barb7472 wrote:Thanks! I've actually been a lurker for a while. It seems that by the time I get to reading the topic, the conversations have been over for hours!
Barb, I don't think our conversations ever really end. I don't set the rules, but I'd say you can feel free to add to a topic whenever you like.

And I've been posting here for years, but I still read--or lurk--much more than I post.

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DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Feb 03, 2008 6:09 pm

fansmom wrote:
Barb7472 wrote:Thanks! I've actually been a lurker for a while. It seems that by the time I get to reading the topic, the conversations have been over for hours!
Barb, I don't think our conversations ever really end. I don't set the rules, but I'd say you can feel free to add to a topic whenever you like.

And I've been posting here for years, but I still read--or lurk--much more than I post.


ONBC is open 24/7. As fansmons said, Barb7472, feel free to jump in anywhere at any time!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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LiMoss
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Unread postby LiMoss » Thu Feb 07, 2008 3:40 pm

Another very interesting tidbit, Liz - thanks so much for putting it together! I have so many to catch up on!!!

It's funny how these cities that grew up near each other (Milwaukee's east/west sides, Minneapolis/St. Paul) began with such rivalry and animosity! War on the bridge!!!

Great picture of downtown Richland Center. It still looks very "original." Great atmosphere. I wonder if they'll do any filming there beyond the bank?

Do you suppose all those entrees on the Little Bohemia menu that bear Dillinger’s name were his favorites? :lol:


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