ATD Question #24 - Advice from Bandini

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ATD Question #24 - Advice from Bandini

Unread postby Liz » Sun Dec 09, 2007 2:14 pm

Pg. 23:

Bandini (being interviewed prior to departure for Sweden): “My advice to all young writers is quite simple. I would caution them never to evade a new experience. I would urge them to live life in the raw, to grapple with it bravely, to attack it with naked fists.”

Does Fante’s writing exemplify this advice? Do you think this advice could be useful in all areas of tackling this life?
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Unread postby nebraska » Sun Dec 09, 2007 4:53 pm

This is probably good advice for everyone, at least while they are young and have the freedom to do so.

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:05 pm

This sounds like something HST could have said. I think Fante's Arturo wants to attack life but he gets caught up in his own personal drama. Arturo's most successful writing seems to come when he adopts that attitude, just banging away at the typewriter without thinking he is really writing somthing structured, just experiencing the moment. The other characters in Ask the Dust seem to be drifting along lethargically most of the time. As nebraska said, it's probably good advice, or easier to follow, when you are younger but I don't think we should ever stop trying!
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Unread postby Betty Sue » Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:27 pm

Fante seemed to follow that advice as much as I could tell. And I heartily agreed with him until I got to the "attack it with naked fists." There's a time and a place for that, but I'm usually more comfortable with a velvet glove. :angel:
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Unread postby gemini » Sun Dec 09, 2007 7:25 pm

I think this was what Bandini was advising himself. He came up with this after all, just as he was propositioned by a prostitute and feeling manly, and his thoughts went right to Sweden. He does try to do this and I think he is correct that wirters are better when they experience what they want to write about, but this is easier said than done. Sometimes responsibilites get in the way. As Nebraska said, easier when you are young.

Funny, my first response when I read the tidbit title before reading the question was, I don't think I want any advice from Bandini.
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Unread postby Parlez » Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:35 pm

Right you are, Gemini ~ I wouldn't be taking advice about anything from Bandini! :freaked:

I also thought the advice sounded strange in light of the fact that, to me, it seemed Bandini spent a lot of time evading new experiences. He had a very old, well-used judgemental template through which he interpreted everything he encountered. Not the open mind I think of when I think of a person embracing life's experiences anew. Ergo, I didn't think Fante expressed any kind of real bravery through the character of Arturo.

But the rawness fits, and the no-holds-barred, gloves-off approach. He was a fighter.

But compared to Kerouac, who so successful got his ego out of the way and was truly an observer in and of the moment, thereby capturing the drama of pure, raw, unedited experience itself, Fante's writing doesn't hold up to his own advice. IMO.
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Unread postby Liz » Sun Dec 09, 2007 9:12 pm

Parlez wrote: Right you are, Gemini ~ I wouldn't be taking advice about anything from Bandini! :freaked:

I also thought the advice sounded strange in light of the fact that, to me, it seemed Bandini spent a lot of time evading new experiences. He had a very old, well-used judgemental template through which he interpreted everything he encountered. Not the open mind I think of when I think of a person embracing life's experiences anew. Ergo, I didn't think Fante expressed any kind of real bravery through the character of Arturo.

But the rawness fits, and the no-holds-barred, gloves-off approach. He was a fighter.

But compared to Kerouac, who so successful got his ego out of the way and was truly an observer in and of the moment, thereby capturing the drama of pure, raw, unedited experience itself, Fante's writing doesn't hold up to his own advice. IMO.

I think in his case, it was more like “do as I say, but not as I do”. I agree that he evaded experiences. I think he was scared and somewhat held back by his past and his religion. I think his writing that passage was more to himself than to young writers. I think he may have been trying to encourage himself. It could also be that in his fantasy world he felt he did experience life fully…..in the raw.

I think it is good advice, although, as a few of you have said, I wouldn’t be looking to Bandini for any advice. I think as I get older I get closer to living life this way…..although I have a ways to go. I have much more courage now than I did as a young adult.
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Unread postby fansmom » Sun Dec 09, 2007 9:46 pm

Liz wrote:It could also be that in his fantasy world he felt he did experience life fully…..in the raw.
Don Quixote? Walter Mitty? Snoopy and his Sopwith Camel? Don Juan De Marco?

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Unread postby gemini » Sun Dec 09, 2007 10:23 pm

fansmom wrote:
Liz wrote:It could also be that in his fantasy world he felt he did experience life fully…..in the raw.
Don Quixote? Walter Mitty? Snoopy and his Sopwith Camel? Don Juan De Marco?

Good point, If fantasy counts, Bandini is very worldly.
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Unread postby Liz » Sun Dec 09, 2007 11:12 pm

fansmom wrote:
Liz wrote:It could also be that in his fantasy world he felt he did experience life fully…..in the raw.
Don Quixote? Walter Mitty? Snoopy and his Sopwith Camel? Don Juan De Marco?


Option 4 please. :thud:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.


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