Bandini Question #22 - Favorite Passages

by John Fante

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Liz
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Bandini Question #22 - Favorite Passages

Unread postby Liz » Tue Sep 25, 2007 3:08 pm

What are your favorite passages?

Sorry this is being posted so late. For some reason :-? I thought it was DITHOT's turn. :blush:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Betty Sue
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Unread postby Betty Sue » Tue Sep 25, 2007 3:51 pm

These may not be my very favorites (will look some more), but I know that Fante grabbed me with his writing the first time I opened the book. He sure got Svevo's plight across quickly and clearly and memorably: "He was cold and there were holes in his shoes. That morning he had patched the hole on the inside with pieces of cardboard from a macaroni box. The macaroni in that box was not paid for."
Then on the next page the story on the eyes got me. What a magical way of writing! "Svevo Bandini's eyes watered in the cold air. They were brown, they were soft, they were a woman's eyes. At birth he had stolen them from his mother--for after the birth of Svevo Bandini, his mother was never quite the same, always ill, always with sickly eyes after his birth, and then she died and it was Svevo's turn to carry soft brown eyes."
Actually, I don't think he wrote a single boring sentence. I love the way he gave life to inanimate things--the doorknob, the house, the movie, the shoes, the field, the church...
"I never wanted to be remembered for being a star."

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Betty Sue
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Unread postby Betty Sue » Tue Sep 25, 2007 4:08 pm

I love the drama of this paragraph about Christmas Eve:
"A footstep on the porch. All the men and women on earth could have mounted that step, yet none would have made a sound like that. They looked at Maria. She held her breath, hurrying through one more prayer. The door opened and he came inside. He closed the door carefully, as though his whole life had been spent in the exact science of closing doors.
'Hello.'"
Look forward to seeing everyone's favorites! Have a feeling they'll be mine, too!
"I never wanted to be remembered for being a star."

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Unread postby Liz » Tue Sep 25, 2007 4:09 pm

If you liked the writing in Bandini, just wait until you read Ask The Dust. IMHO the writing is even better.

I liked this one:

“A sweetness would at last pervade him, a soothing lull him, a breeze cool him, a loveliness caress him. He would walk out of the church in a dream, and in a dream he would walk, and if no one was looking he’d kiss a tree, eat a blade of grass, blow kisses at the sky, touch the cold stones of the church wall with fingers of magic, the peace in his heart like nothing save a chocolate malted, a three-base hit, a shining window to be broken, the hypnosis of that moment what comes before sleep.”

Ahh...the relief confession brings.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby gemini » Tue Sep 25, 2007 5:51 pm

I like his description of being captivated by a movie.
At once he was under the spell of that celluloid drug. He was positive that his own face bore a striking resemblance to that of Robert Powell, and he was equally sure that the face of Gloria Borden bore an amazing resemblance to his wonderful Rosa: thus he found himself perfectly at home, laughing uproariously at Robert Powell's witty comments, and shuddering with voluptuous delight whenever Gloria Borden looked passionate. Gradually Robert Powell lost his identity and became Arturo Bandini, and gradually Gloria Borden metamorphosed into Rosa Pinelli.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." Will Rogers

Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

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Unread postby nebraska » Wed Sep 26, 2007 2:46 pm

I flipped through my book to see if I had marked any passages.......not many, just a few, and they were marked mainly for content rather than poetry. I thought the whole book was just brilliantly written and I was completely taken in by it from the beginning. Only a couple of pages into the book, I was hooked.....my emotions had been overpowered and I already cared what happened. The writing is visceral, so raw and so real.......It would be hard to pick out any parts of the book that weren't beautifully written.

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Wed Sep 26, 2007 6:58 pm

His descriptive passages were definitely among my favorites. gemini, I had the movie passage marked as well. :cool:

Above all my favorite was the passage in Question #21, The rosary for Rosa. I noticed I had WOW! written in the margin. It is so beautifully written and so thought provoking.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!


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