TPAOL Question #15 ~ Parallels

by James Meek

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Bix
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Unread postby Bix » Thu Feb 15, 2007 1:33 am

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:gemini, the party never ends so you can't be late! The suicide bombers are a good example of doing something for the "greater good" as one perceives it to be. There have been so many atrocities that have been committed for political or religious reasons for centuries. It boggles the mind. :-/

What you said here made me remember that I had copied out a quote years ago from a book called Blackbird Days by Ken Chowder (1980): Will loaded his [ceramic] pots into the trunk of his car carefully, wrapping them with newspaper and laying them side by side in a bed of crumpled news. Around the world there had been small wars: a question of religion was answered with theological spatterings from machine guns; a division of opinion as to the ownership of a certain territory was resolved by the destruction of same (Solomon's justice); humans of one tint made colorful messes on the street with those of another; these all chronicled by black markings on soft white paper."
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Unread postby Liz » Thu Feb 15, 2007 10:44 am

Wow, that quote leaves quite an impact, Bix. :-O Although it is such a sad passage, it is beautifully and artfully written.
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Unread postby Linda Lee » Thu Feb 15, 2007 11:14 am

Liz wrote:Wow, that quote leaves quite an impact, Bix. :-O Although it is such a sad passage, it is beautifully and artfully written.


Liz, you are right, reading that quote gave me chills.

This morning, I was thinking of this question and a few more possible parallels came to mind, the assasinations of Abraham Lincoln, John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy as acts of anarchy. The need for the civil rights movement in the US and the violence that accompanied it.
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Thu Feb 15, 2007 12:05 pm

What a great piece of writing, Bix. I can see why it stuck with you.

Linda Lee, the civil rights movement is a good example. In fact I think the decade of the 60's is a good parallel in general. It was a time of social upheaval in this country that left many people fearful and unsettled.
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Unread postby Liz » Thu Feb 15, 2007 3:57 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:What a great piece of writing, Bix. I can see why it stuck with you.

Linda Lee, the civil rights movement is a good example. In fact I think the decade of the 60's is a good parallel in general. It was a time of social upheaval in this country that left many people fearful and unsettled.


Hunter was somewhat of a revolutionary--in a more peaceful way.
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Unread postby suec » Thu Feb 15, 2007 9:17 pm

Well, I am very late to this thread, but have dithered a bit in my choices.
Here is one parallel from English history: the Peasants' Revolt of 1381. Although it is called this, it included others apart from peasants. It sprang up in the south of England after the imposing of the poll tax. Some villagers refused to pay up, and it escalated from there. Anyway, to cut a long story short, the 'peasants' marched on London and laid siege to the then king, a 14 year-old Richard II. It may seem quite trivial, but castles were stormed - or rather sympathisers let them in - buildings were destroyed, some of the king's advisers were murdered - being dragged from the Tower of London. Richard rode out, listened and agreed to their demands - essentially the end to serfdom – and the peasants began to disperse, trusting him. Others stayed, to deliver more, revolutionary, demands the next day. But then the leader of the peasants was killed. Richard gained control, persuading the people to follow him to another place, where a trap had been set. The ringleaders were summarily dealt with. The peasants were under control again - but the poll tax wasn't dared again for another 600 years. Not a bad achievement for medieval times. I wonder what would have happened had the leader not been killed - or Richard been less a Samarin type. It seems, for instance, that the king was genuinely revered and trusted. The people distrusted his advisors and felt that they only needed to present their case to him.
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Unread postby Liz » Thu Feb 15, 2007 10:30 pm

The end of serfdom? Trivial? I think not. Thank you for sharing some English history with us, Suec. I don’t have a very clear picture of that time period. I remember hating that period in history class--probably because I was on the side of the serfs. I was also bored. But that is because I was 14 or younger. I didn’t have a clue then.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.


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