Happy Days Question #18 ~ The Message

by Laurent Graff

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DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
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Happy Days Question #18 ~ The Message

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Thu Dec 21, 2006 10:52 am

Noodlemantras, we have once again come to the end of another fabulous discussion. :bawl: This one has been particularly thought provoking for such a tiny book. :perplexed: Thank you all for your participation and wonderful, insightful ideas. :ohyes: Whether you have been posting or just reading, we are glad to have you on board. :sailboat: Be sure you have The People’s Act of Love on your holiday wish list. That one promises to be another great read and discussion! :bounce:

Now, our final question…

What message is Graff trying to send with Happy Days?


Happy Holidays to you all! :twohearts:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!

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Re: Happy Days Question #18 ~ The Message

Unread postby Depputante » Thu Dec 21, 2006 1:39 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:
Now, our final question…

What message is Graff trying to send with Happy Days?


Happy Holidays to you all! :twohearts:



Well, I think I'd like to look into the quote from his tidbit and Question#16. It keeps coming up.
“Through these two decisions of my character, (Antoine’s decisions to purchase his headstone and to live in Happy Days) I want to lead the reader to change point of view on the live, to look it by the end, since old age and death.”


There is a quote around? somewhere about inspecting a bug on the head of a pin. Watch it, see what it does since it can't go anywhere. I think this is what Graff means by his interview. A raw inspection of life and death.

I would like to see this original French quote translated, not by Google, but by one of the French ladies on the Zone. In English it's Subject Verb Object, in French, I think the order is Subject Object Verb. So I imagine he's trying to say...... Lead the reader to change their point of view on life, by being old and dying, by inspecting the end of it.

I think Graff is asking of us, to change our point of view about life.

His message, might be, that things never change , if you're of the camp sitting on that same bench with Antoine. :-/

If you go through the paradigm shift :eyebrow: (my new word..from Shantram I'm fond of)...then the bench isnt' really the same bench anymore, it can be used for anything. and, Antoine too has undergone a change (albeit extremely subtle), and is better able to enjoy life more, with more balance, relax, and admiration for life. :chill:

PARLEZ, I suppose, then that yes, his Karma has changed, somewhat. (Yesterday I said no.) but today, Yes. Because he's able to see things in a different angle or light, perspective. But Antoine still isn't :disco:.
“The scariest enemy is from within. Allowing yourself to be limited and conform to what you're expected to conform to.”~JD

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Unread postby Parlez » Thu Dec 21, 2006 1:59 pm

Well, I see I'm still all over the page on this book! Which, I have a sneaking suspicion, is what the author intended from the beginning. :banghead:

But, to respond to you, Depputante, I'm disinclined to acquisce to your conclusion about Antoine not :disco: .
On the contrary, I see a very bubbly (fizzy) guy sitting on that bench in the end. He's :disco: inside, because he's learned to generate fresh eyes with every glance and a whole new world with every breath.

That'll about do it for me (and my emoticons). :wave:
"Belay that! ...Do something else!" ~ Hector Barbossa
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Unread postby Depputante » Thu Dec 21, 2006 2:12 pm

Parlez wrote: On the contrary, I see a very bubbly (fizzy) guy sitting on that bench in the end. He's :disco: inside, because he's learned to generate fresh eyes with every glance and a whole new world with every breath.


:investigate: Ok, Parlez, I'll re read it. Just the last chapter won't do it justice though. The transistion is important too. :noodlemantra:
Thanks for the heads up on this. I'll see what I can find. Inside, you say? :sherlockholmes:
“The scariest enemy is from within. Allowing yourself to be limited and conform to what you're expected to conform to.”~JD

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Unread postby Lady Jill » Thu Dec 21, 2006 4:15 pm

For my most simplest reaction to this question. . .it would have to be:
To view death ( the old and dying ) one can only be here now and LIVE.

Isn't this what we have all gone through here in the discussions of gravestones, retirement homes, the whole concept that we too are going to be old sooner or later and utimately die? Haven't we looked at death through the eyes of Antoine only to come back to today and brace life as it is?

Lady Jill
" After we're gone, the only thing that matters is the love we left behind."

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Unread postby Liz » Thu Dec 21, 2006 5:07 pm

Lady Jill wrote:For my most simplest reaction to this question. . .it would have to be:
To view death ( the old and dying ) one can only be here now and LIVE.

Isn't this what we have all gone through here in the discussions of gravestones, retirement homes, the whole concept that we too are going to be old sooner or later and utimately die? Haven't we looked at death through the eyes of Antoine only to come back to today and brace life as it is?

Lady Jill


Well, I certainly have, Lady Jill. I'm glad that Antoine did the experiment for me. Now I don't have to. :disco:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Red Shoes » Thu Dec 21, 2006 5:46 pm

I still really don't understand the book, so I'm just not sure what he's trying to say. But what I get out of it is the conviction that one must really LIVE life... that even if you choose to live in a way that most people wouldn't, you have to give it everything you've got - take every opportunity and absorb everything around you.

But then, that's already my view of life so maybe I'm just projecting. *shrug*

It almost seems that, despite his posturing about death, Graff really wants us to learn about life. The whole book is about Antoine preparing for death, but then in the end he doesn't die - he starts hanging out with children, and life just keeps going on.

Perhaps that's it, a simple "Life goes on. Do what you will with it."


Thanks to DITHOT and Liz, and all the rest of you for a great discussion. I've really enjoyed stretching my brain a little bit and reading all your interesting and varying ideas. Thanks!
"It's good to be different."

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Unread postby Liz » Thu Dec 21, 2006 6:23 pm

Red Shoes wrote:I still really don't understand the book, so I'm just not sure what he's trying to say. But what I get out of it is the conviction that one must really LIVE life... that even if you choose to live in a way that most people wouldn't, you have to give it everything you've got - take every opportunity and absorb everything around you.

But then, that's already my view of life so maybe I'm just projecting. *shrug*

It almost seems that, despite his posturing about death, Graff really wants us to learn about life. The whole book is about Antoine preparing for death, but then in the end he doesn't die - he starts hanging out with children, and life just keeps going on.

Perhaps that's it, a simple "Life goes on. Do what you will with it."


Thanks to DITHOT and Liz, and all the rest of you for a great discussion. I've really enjoyed stretching my brain a little bit and reading all your interesting and varying ideas. Thanks!


And thanks to you, Red Shoes, for joining us......and to all the rest of the Noodlemantras. It has been a deep and eye-opening discussion--the best kind. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: You guys :rocknroll:

I'm still wavering on what I think his message is, though.
:perplexed:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Parlez » Thu Dec 21, 2006 6:38 pm

Accord! In the time of your life, LIVE!
And for those of you (us) who are closer to Happy Days than we (I) would like to be, I'll say that I have every confidence that when we get there it'll be a very different place indeed. We Boomers simply won't tolerate any old thing. I see great paradigm shifts ahead in the arena of aging and care giving and dying. For instance, imagine, if you will, wearing protective underwear with DEPP-ENDS written across the bottom. Or having an 'entertainment room' dedicated to Timothy Leary, Keith Richards, and the Good Doctor. Or having the dining room emblazoned with "Animal House" at the entrance. Or finding at the end of the hallway the Kovorkian Memorial Departure Lounge.
Puts a different spin on things, eh?
CONGRATULATIONS!! WE'RE GETTIN' THERE!!
:disco:
"Belay that! ...Do something else!" ~ Hector Barbossa

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Unread postby Liz » Thu Dec 21, 2006 6:49 pm

Parlez wrote:Accord! In the time of your life, LIVE!
And for those of you (us) who are closer to Happy Days than we (I) would like to be, I'll say that I have every confidence that when we get there it'll be a very different place indeed. We Boomers simply won't tolerate any old thing. I see great paradigm shifts ahead in the arena of aging and care giving and dying. For instance, imagine, if you will, wearing protective underwear with Depp-ENDS written across the bottom. Or having an 'entertainment room' dedicated to Timothy Leary, Keith Richards, and the Good Doctor. Or having the dining room emblazoned with "Animal House" at the entrance. Or finding at the end of the hallway the Kovorkian Memorial Departure Lounge.
Puts a different spin on things, eh?
CONGRATULATIONS!! WE'RE GETTIN' THERE!!
:disco:


:biglaugh:

Let's hear it for the Depp Diva Baby Boomers! :dance:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby gemini » Thu Dec 21, 2006 7:10 pm

I see a very bubbly (fizzy) guy sitting on that bench in the end. He's happy inside, because he's learned to generate fresh eyes with every glance and a whole new world with every breath.


Parlez, You and I will have to agree to disagree on this one. He may have a fresh new way of looking but he is still just looking. Living is a little more involved.
Of course My attention span might just not be lasting as long as yours for digging deep enough.

Redshoes thinks Graff wants us to learn about life.

I am not so sure that was his message. That is what Antionne was "trying" to do, studying the end of life but did he succeed? Ok, I am going to get deep here.
The book did make me want to embrace my life and make sure I don't take it for granted but I think Graff may have had a higher goal in mind. He was more into Antionne's sacrifice to learn the answer to the big question of why are we here. What better way to get everyone to consider this than reading about a guy with an unconventional odd way of searching for why he is here? The fact that the answer is up to each ones interpretation may have been intended as well.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." Will Rogers

Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

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Unread postby gemini » Thu Dec 21, 2006 7:14 pm

Parlez wrote:Accord! In the time of your life, LIVE!
And for those of you (us) who are closer to Happy Days than we (I) would like to be, I'll say that I have every confidence that when we get there it'll be a very different place indeed. We Boomers simply won't tolerate any old thing. I see great paradigm shifts ahead in the arena of aging and care giving and dying. For instance, imagine, if you will, wearing protective underwear with Depp-ENDS written across the bottom. Or having an 'entertainment room' dedicated to Timothy Leary, Keith Richards, and the Good Doctor. Or having the dining room emblazoned with "Animal House" at the entrance. Or finding at the end of the hallway the Kovorkian Memorial Departure Lounge.
Puts a different spin on things, eh?
CONGRATULATIONS!! WE'RE GETTIN' THERE!!
:disco:

As one of those who are closer to Happy Days than we would like to be, you are right. I am watching my parents and have no intention being their kind of old.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." Will Rogers



Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Thu Dec 21, 2006 7:55 pm

Parlez, I'm moving into your retirement home when the time comes. :biglaugh: :bounce: I agree we Baby Boomers won't be going gently into that good night. :cool:

gemini, I think it was about the journey and what he gave up too. I wanted him to be a messenger for the rest of us and explain to us what he discovered on his journey, but we don't really know. I think Graff explains the message when he says he wants the reader to look at life from the end. I hope his message is this is what could be waiting. The end isn't much so live while you can. But then Antoine never did that, he stayed where he was observing his world, waiting for the end. So I guess I have mixed ideas on what the message was.
:eyebrow:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby Liz » Thu Dec 21, 2006 8:05 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote: So I guess I have mixed ideas on what the message was. :eyebrow:


I'm counting on Johnny to make it all clear. :cloud9:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Parlez » Thu Dec 21, 2006 8:33 pm

It's not what Antoine's doing, or what he's thinking;
it's what he's seeing.
"Belay that! ...Do something else!" ~ Hector Barbossa

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