Good Omens Question #13 - Favorite Passages

by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett

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Liz
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Good Omens Question #13 - Favorite Passages

Unread postby Liz » Sat Aug 19, 2006 11:15 am

What were your favorite lines or passages from Good Omens?
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Liz » Sat Aug 19, 2006 1:32 pm

OK. I’ll start us off with this oh so clever passage….

Pg. 52 (hardback)


“And it’ll be for the child’s own good, in the long run,” said Crowley. “We’ll be godfathers, sort of. Overseeing his religious upbringing, you might say.”
Aziraphale beamed.
“You know, I’d never have thought of that,” he said. “Godfathers. Well, I’ll be damned.”
“It’s not too bad,” said Crowley,” when you get used to it.”


:lol:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Theresa
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Unread postby Theresa » Sat Aug 19, 2006 1:54 pm

I have quite a few passages that I really liked in this book -- any passage that makes me laugh out loud is a good one.

(page 14, hardback)

Crowley was currently doing 110 mph somewhere east of Slough. Nothing about him looked particularly demonic, at loeast by classical standards. No horns, no wings. Admittedly he was listening to a Best of Queens tape, but no conclusions should be drawn from this because all tapes left in a car for more than about a fortnight metamorphose into Best of Queen albums.

And a little further along, on page 79:
"Ah, this is more like it. Tchaikovsky," said Aziraphale, opening a case and slotting its cassette into the Blaupunkt. [. . .]
A heavy bass beat began to thump throught the Bentley as they sped past Heathrow.
Aziraphale's brow furrowed.
"I don't recognize this," he said. "What is it?"
"It's Tchaikovsky's 'Another One Bites the Dust,'" said Crowley, closing his eyes as they went through Slough.
[. . .]they also listened to William Byrd's "We Are the Champions" and Beethoven's "I Want To Break Free." Neither were as good as Vaughan Williams's "Fat-Bottomed Girls."

:grin:

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Unread postby Betty Sue » Sat Aug 19, 2006 2:11 pm

So many! Almost any! Love yours, Liz and theresa! A few at random:
(P. 162, paperback) This is how Newton Pulsifier looked as a man: if he went into a phone booth and changed, he might manage to come out looking like Clark Kent. (Actually, that ain't too bad! :eyebrow: }
(P. 311, paperback) No one stopped the four as they purposefully made their way into one of the long, low buildings under the forest of radio masts. Perhaps they saw nothing at all. Perhaps they saw what their minds were instructed to see, because the human brain is not equipped to see War, Famine, Pollution, and Death when they don't want to be seen, and has got so good at not seeing that it often manages not to see them even when they abound on every side. :-/
(P. 337, paperback) Aziraphale patted Crowley on the back. "We seem to have survived," he said. "Just imagine how terrible it might have been if we'd been at all competent." :-O
The ending...but we'll get to that later. :cloud9:
"I never wanted to be remembered for being a star."

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Unread postby Liz » Sat Aug 19, 2006 3:29 pm

Great choices so far, Noodlemantras. :cool: I have more favs to post, but I'm off to do some errands. I'll check back later and post then.

I just wanted to ask that you all refrain from commenting on this particular favorite of Betty Sue's as there will be a question on it later. It's a good one that begs for further discussion. No worries, Betty Sue. :cool:


(P. 311, paperback) No one stopped the four as they purposefully made their way into one of the long, low buildings under the forest of radio masts. Perhaps they saw nothing at all. Perhaps they saw what their minds were instructed to see, because the human brain is not equipped to see War, Famine, Pollution, and Death when they don't want to be seen, and has got so good at not seeing that it often manages not to see them even when they abound on every side.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Betty Sue » Sat Aug 19, 2006 3:51 pm

Might have guessed that passage calls for much discussion!!
"I never wanted to be remembered for being a star."

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Unread postby Theresa » Sat Aug 19, 2006 10:08 pm

Okay, another one from me.

Page 227, hardback -- this is talking about the computer that Crowley has in his flat, and the footnote that follows.


[. . .]a sleek computer was the sort of thing Crowley felt that the sort of human he tried to be would have. This one was like a Porsche with a screen. The Manuals were still in their transparent wrapping. *

*Along with the standard computer warranty agreement which said that if the machine 1) didn't work, 2) didn't do what the expensive advertisements said, 3) electrocuted the immediate neighborhood, 4) and in fact failed entirely to be inside the expensive box when you opened it, this was expressly, absolutely, implictly and in no event the fault or responsibility of the manufacturer, that the purchaser should consider himself lucky to be allowed to give his money to the manufacturer, and that any attempt to treat what had just been paid for as the purchaser's own property would result in the attentions of serious men with menacing briefcases and very thin watches. Crowley had been extremely impressed with the warranties offered by the computer industry, and had in fact sent a bundle Below to the department that drew up the Immortal Soul agreements, with a yellow memo form attached just saying: "Learn, guys."

:biglaugh:

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Unread postby stroch » Sat Aug 19, 2006 10:47 pm

Hear, hear! Crowley knows diabolical deeds when he sees them.

Despite being forewarned by the passage you just quoted, I actually went to the Mic****ft web site to ASK FOR HELP!!!!

Fall over laughing! I actually thought the "help and support" link meant just that! Good one, guys!

One of my other favorites is when C nd A are discussing what went wrong with placing the baby antichrist, and blaming it on the hospital personnel. Crowley says it was full of Satanists:

"...there were few things that the two agreed on, but they did see eye to eye about some of those people, who, for one reason or another, were inclined to worship the Prince of Darkness. Crowley always found them embarrassing. You couldn't actually be rude to them, but you couldn't help feeling about them them the same way that, say, a Vietnam veteran would feel about someone who wears combat gear to Neighborhood Watch meetings"

The passage goes on and ends with a reference to Chicken Marengo.
I'll buy you the hat....a really big one.
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Unread postby Liz » Sun Aug 20, 2006 12:14 am

I can relate, Stroch and Theresa.

And where was Agnes when I needed her?


“She managed to come up with the kind of predictions that you can only understand afte the thing has happened,” said Anathema. “Like ‘Do Notte Bye Betamacks.’ That was a prediction for 1972.”

:banghead:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby suec » Sun Aug 20, 2006 6:04 am

theresa, I love your 'Learn, guys' passage - too funny. I pretty much love anything with Crowley in, in fact. For instance, him talking to the house plants. The bit where he walks into the burning building and looks severely at a flame daring to touch his trouser leg. And where his sunglasses get knocked off and he is described on the floor as being uncool, (something like that anyway). I love the bit where he is the last to arrive at Lower Tadfield and asks the old guy for directions. The description of the car and the man's thoughts is hysterical.
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Unread postby nebraska » Sun Aug 20, 2006 1:30 pm

I find it so hard to pick just one or two favorite passages from Good Omens…..there was so much that made me laugh and so much that made me think…entire passages that were filled with things to ponder , simple phrases that were wonderful bits of writing…..here are just a few that I especially liked…….

Pages 25 and 26 in my copy, fragments from several paragraphs – Crowley on humans:

“…nothing he could think up was half as bad as the stuff they thought up themselves…The were born into a world that was against them in a thousand little ways, and then devoted most of their energies to making it worse…there’s nothing we can do to them that they don’t do themselves and they do things we’ve never even thought of, often involving electrodes. They’ve got what we lack. They’ve got imagination”.

Page 135 in my copy, about the workers at Burger Lord:

“The serving staff had identical gleaming smiles that never reached their eyes.”

Page 168 in my copy, about the International Express man:

“He looked like Victorian Romantic poets looked just before the consumption and drug abuse really started to cut it.” (and of course, on that same page, “They’d come here to spoon and, on one memorable occasion, fork” :lol: :blush: )


Page 200, my copy:

“poling the boat of common sense upstream against the raging current of the evidence.” :banghead:

Page 252, my copy:

“She felt she looked haunted and gaunt and romantic, and she would have, if she had lost another thirty pounds. She was convinced that she was anorexic, because every time she looked in the mirror she did indeed see a fat person.” I think that describes me! :biglaugh:

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Unread postby Bix » Sun Aug 20, 2006 8:12 pm

Loved all your picks! One of my favorites is right at the beginning (p 4 paperback) in the discussion of the exact date of creation:

God does not play dice with the universe; he plays an ineffable game of His own devising which might be compared, from the perspective of any of the other players,* to being involved in an obscure and complex version of poker in a pitch-dark room, with blank cards, for infinite stakes, with a Dealer who won't tell you the rules, and who smiles all the time.

*i.e., everybody

And I couldn't find the page or the phrase again quickly, but I loved the sentence that DITHOT used as inspiration for a tidbit about a nightingale actually singing unheard in Berkeley Square as A and C dined at the Ritz.
Live! Life is a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death! ~Auntie Mame

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Aug 20, 2006 8:38 pm

“They went to the Ritz again, where a table was mysteriously vacant. And perhaps the recent exertions had had some fallout in the nature of reality because, while they were eating, for the first time ever, a nightingale sang in Berkeley Square.

No one heard it over the noise of the traffic, but it was there, right enough.”


Is that it Bix?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby Bix » Sun Aug 20, 2006 9:28 pm

That's the one, DITHOT! :thanks:
Live! Life is a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death! ~Auntie Mame

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Mon Aug 21, 2006 8:27 am

You're welcome, Bix! :cool:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!


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