F&LILV Question #27 ~ A different view?

by Hunter S. Thompson

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DeppLovesBananahs
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Unread postby DeppLovesBananahs » Sun Oct 02, 2005 10:13 pm

I really loved the book. In seeing the movie for the first time, I had no idea really who Hunter S. Thompson was, or really who Johnny Depp was, I was in the beginning stages of obsession. I now really admire Hunter for what he is, a complete and utter genius. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is one of the best books I've ever read. I'm so glad I read it.

Hannah
"No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." Eleanor Rosevelt

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DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Oct 02, 2005 11:10 pm

What a great introduction to Hunter and to Johnny. :cool:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
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Unread postby dharma_bum » Mon Oct 03, 2005 2:21 am

I first read FAVILV in college. Years later I sat in a dark theater and let the movie take me back to my first (but certainly not last) fling with Hunter.

Reading FALILV this time around took me on more of an emotional roller coaster than I imagined. I definitely laughed harder, louder, longer… but knowing his voice was gone forever made reading the wave bittersweet in a way that surprised even me.

Our discussions have made the book so much more present and alive, and to use a familiar expression to us all… a great gift.
"You can't broom out your head. You certainly can't broom out your heart. And there's a hot wire between them, and everything shows in the eyes."
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JD101
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Unread postby JD101 » Mon Oct 03, 2005 8:34 am

Well said (as usual DB... you're so articulate). There was a real bittersweet feeling while reading this again after Hunter’s death. I think that was the main difference for me. Though when I first read it as a drug crazed kid I really didn’t get the deeper meanings… at all. I only saw it as a savage burn on the Establishment… and thoroughly enjoyed it as such. Even reading it as an adult, I don’t think I was able to focus as much as I have been able to by participating in the discussions here. It really brought me more insight than I ever got on my own.

My opinion of the movie hasn’t really changed… I still think it’s brilliant! It incorporates the jist of what Hunter was trying to get across, Johnny’s performance was…layered, perfect, dead on, deep, heartfelt, dedicated, amazing, wonderful… well, you get the idea. Benicio was his peer in sheer brilliance and power. I think what may have changed since my first viewing in the theaters is my understanding of the dedication it took to bring the book to the screen. I was impressed after hearing the commentaries on the Criterion edition. That helped bring insight to the film for me.

I also wanted to comment on the difference between the book and the movie for me. I see them almost as two separate and slightly different stories. The feeling that I get when the film credits roll is quite different than the feeling I get closing the book. I have a feeling of exuberance during credits, watching Raoul glide down the highway towards LA, flag waving behind and arm raised. I have a much more quite and contemplative feeling at the closing of the book. The ending isn’t wrapped up nearly so neatly, just like real life. But then I guess a great ending is what we go to the movies for in the first place.
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DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Mon Oct 03, 2005 8:39 am

I saw the book and the movie as slightly different as well JD101. I saw more humor in the book and after discussing it I do see hope in the story that I did not get in the movie.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby shame_about_rasins » Mon Oct 03, 2005 7:35 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:I saw the book and the movie as slightly different as well JD101. I saw more humor in the book and after discussing it I do see hope in the story that I did not get in the movie.

I agree.
before he came down it never snowed.........

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Unread postby DeppLovesBananahs » Mon Oct 03, 2005 9:23 pm

dharma_bum wrote:I first read FAVILV in college. Years later I sat in a dark theater and let the movie take me back to my first (but certainly not last) fling with Hunter.

Reading FALILV this time around took me on more of an emotional roller coaster than I imagined. I definitely laughed harder, louder, longer… but knowing his voice was gone forever made reading the wave bittersweet in a way that surprised even me.

Our discussions have made the book so much more present and alive, and to use a familiar expression to us all… a great gift.


Perfectly said, DB. While I was reading it, I definitely got the humor much more than I did when I first saw the movie. I laughed much more than I did with the movie, probably because I wasn't familiar with HST at all.

And you're right, the discussions really have made the book more enjoyable and more alive.

Hannah
"No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." Eleanor Rosevelt


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