F&LILV Question #14-Stoned, ripped, twisted..Good people

by Hunter S. Thompson

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DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Wed Sep 21, 2005 8:33 am

shame_about_rasins wrote:dharma_bum said:
The relationship I see in all this is that voices like Hunter’s are not as welcome in today’s climate of “let’s pretend” censorship. Would Rolling Stone have published FALILV six months ago? I think not.

I agree with that and, but I think it is not just today is censorship, there has been censorship before and after Vietnam, I think that the harsh reality of war was let out to the public, and the fact that America lost the war. I think maybe there is a connection there. FALILV points out the failures in the American Dream, or parts of America, and that is connected to Vietnam, America thought they were invincible, and Vietnam showed that they weren't, everything is not peachy. And I think FALILV shows the same thing to some extent. Anyone else think so?


sar, I'm going to ask that we get into this discussion during our American Dream question which I PROMISE will be coming before we are done... :thanks:
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Unread postby Endora » Wed Sep 21, 2005 12:15 pm

Liz wrote:Sands, I find that interesting that the UK was not involved in Vietnam. I just don't remember the extent of involvement from other countries. However, I'm surprised because my husband lived in England in the mid to late 60's on or near an English Air Force Base while his dad flew C-141's in Nam.


Liz, there are two reasons that I'd like to put for the UK not being involved. Firstly, the UK had had a tough time in WW2 in SE Asia, and memories were still sore. Politically, anything even resmbling another jungle campaign would have been suicidal. Secondly, the French heritage of Vietnam maent that the UK would be seen almost as meddling in the affairs of another European country, and this when the Uk wanted to join the EU, in which the French were powerful. These are not necessarily the only reasons, though.
I think this is separate from the location of the bases, which have been a feature of life here since WW2. We live quite near a couple, and to give you an idea of the scale of these bases, the local McDonalds used to have prices in both pounds and dollars up til a couple of years ago!
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Unread postby Liz » Wed Sep 21, 2005 12:48 pm

Endora wrote:
Liz wrote:Sands, I find that interesting that the UK was not involved in Vietnam. I just don't remember the extent of involvement from other countries. However, I'm surprised because my husband lived in England in the mid to late 60's on or near an English Air Force Base while his dad flew C-141's in Nam.


Liz, there are two reasons that I'd like to put for the UK not being involved. Firstly, the UK had had a tough time in WW2 in SE Asia, and memories were still sore. Politically, anything even resmbling another jungle campaign would have been suicidal. Secondly, the French heritage of Vietnam maent that the UK would be seen almost as meddling in the affairs of another European country, and this when the Uk wanted to join the EU, in which the French were powerful. These are not necessarily the only reasons, though.
I think this is separate from the location of the bases, which have been a feature of life here since WW2. We live quite near a couple, and to give you an idea of the scale of these bases, the local McDonalds used to have prices in both pounds and dollars up til a couple of years ago!


Well, that explains it. I probably should have asked DH about it, but didn't think to do that. I'm sure your explanation is clearer anyway--at least from a British point of view, which he may not have been privy to at that age. He lived in or near Bereford (sp?) BTW. :thanks!:
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Unread postby shame_about_rasins » Wed Sep 21, 2005 6:15 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:
shame_about_rasins wrote:dharma_bum said:
The relationship I see in all this is that voices like Hunter’s are not as welcome in today’s climate of “let’s pretend” censorship. Would Rolling Stone have published FALILV six months ago? I think not.

I agree with that and, but I think it is not just today is censorship, there has been censorship before and after Vietnam, I think that the harsh reality of war was let out to the public, and the fact that America lost the war. I think maybe there is a connection there. FALILV points out the failures in the American Dream, or parts of America, and that is connected to Vietnam, America thought they were invincible, and Vietnam showed that they weren't, everything is not peachy. And I think FALILV shows the same thing to some extent. Anyone else think so?


sar, I'm going to ask that we get into this discussion during our American Dream question which I PROMISE will be coming before we are done... :thanks:

OK :cool:
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Unread postby dharma_bum » Thu Sep 22, 2005 12:00 am

Endora wrote:
Liz wrote:Sands, I find that interesting that the UK was not involved in Vietnam. I just don't remember the extent of involvement from other countries. However, I'm surprised because my husband lived in England in the mid to late 60's on or near an English Air Force Base while his dad flew C-141's in Nam.


Liz, there are two reasons that I'd like to put for the UK not being involved. Firstly, the UK had had a tough time in WW2 in SE Asia, and memories were still sore. Politically, anything even resmbling another jungle campaign would have been suicidal. Secondly, the French heritage of Vietnam maent that the UK would be seen almost as meddling in the affairs of another European country, and this when the Uk wanted to join the EU, in which the French were powerful. These are not necessarily the only reasons, though.
I think this is separate from the location of the bases, which have been a feature of life here since WW2. We live quite near a couple, and to give you an idea of the scale of these bases, the local McDonalds used to have prices in both pounds and dollars up til a couple of years ago!


Not sure the comedian/commentator Bill Maher is well known in the UK, but his solution for cultural embarassment abroad is to claim that he is Swiss.
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Unread postby gilly » Thu Sep 22, 2005 2:08 am

I guess for me,the whole drug- excess thing was a comment on American society at the time...What was one to do when all hope for the future had been dashed?.The 60's had engendered a powerful feeling of optimism...Then all that was kicked in the teeth..I remember what Benicio del Toro said in his commentary, that a junkie's condition is a reflection of the condition of society as a whole...So,to me,it's a metaphor,to show what Hunter thought of society..that it was sick,perverted and doomed. :cool:
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Unread postby shame_about_rasins » Sat Sep 24, 2005 2:32 am

gilly wrote:I guess for me,the whole drug- excess thing was a comment on American society at the time...What was one to do when all hope for the future had been dashed?.The 60's had engendered a powerful feeling of optimism...Then all that was kicked in the teeth..I remember what Benicio del Toro said in his commentary, that a junkie's condition is a reflection of the condition of society as a whole...So,to me,it's a metaphor,to show what Hunter thought of society..that it was sick,perverted and doomed. :cool:

I definatly agree, but I have not watched the dvd with the commentary, my friend still has it :banghead: .
Do you have the edition that was released in Australia or do you have the Criterion edition??
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