C&TCF Question #14: More than meets the eye?

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DeppInTheHeartOfTexas
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C&TCF Question #14: More than meets the eye?

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Tue Mar 15, 2005 10:09 am

Do you think there is an adult level to Charlie and Chocolate Factory or is it simply an amusing children's book?
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Unread postby es » Tue Mar 15, 2005 11:45 am

i think in every childsbook there is a adult story.
i think al the statements we have discussed are for example problably only picted up by adults.
and i must atmid that i liked to read childbooks from time to time,the themes are mostly the same(i like to read mostly fantasybooks)but the storytelling is directer,your going from a to z in one line while by adultsbooks there are more subplots.
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Unread postby suec » Tue Mar 15, 2005 7:01 pm

I also think there is an adult level to it. There are ideas targeted at children, but also, for parents reading it to their children, for example, there is a message there. There is the influence of TV. And we have discussed the rampant advertising and commercial tricks of WW, which can be looked at in different ways. Although, I think this can be discussed with children too. It does offer a comment on society that can be explored on different levels, if readers wish to. Take the oompa-lompas, which were mentioned in that essay. Children relate to them in one way. I think of them as being an example of the way some businesses operate. An employer decides that his workers aren't meeting his requirements, so he replaces them with "better ones". In the real world, many adults would be able to relate to that, when a company decides to re-locate its factory to another country, because costs are lower. There are themes that appeal to all ages, such as wish-fulfilment too.
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Question 14.More than meets the eye?

Unread postby gilly » Tue Mar 15, 2005 8:00 pm

That's dead right es ''in every child's book there is an adult story'' Everything we do /read we filter through our own perceptions.It depends on what we as readers,bring to the story,so,inevitably reading a children's book we are going to see adult themes.And I think Dahl encourages this notion,because as Suec says,there is a more complicated side to the Chocolate Factory world.It's not just sweetness and light and I think this is what Dahl intended us to take from the book.That there can be cruelty,injustice and plain nastiness in a child's world P.S. Thank you DITHOT and Liz for these fantastic questions.You have done so much wonderful research. :cool: :cloud9:

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Tue Mar 15, 2005 10:05 pm

gilly wrote: That's dead right es ''in every child's book there is an adult story'' Everything we do /read we filter through our own perceptions.


And probably in every writer of children's literature as well. It would be hard to write a book as an adult with no "filter" as you say, on a conscious level or not.

gilly wrote: Thank you DITHOT and Liz for these fantastic questions.You have done so much wonderful research. :cool: :cloud9:


You are most welcome. We enjoy reading all the answers everyone posts! :cool:
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Unread postby Liz » Wed Mar 16, 2005 10:01 am

And I just realized I never answered this question. I think there is definitely an adult story in CATCF. I believe it is a story for all ages--that all ages can enjoy. As Suec said, there are many aspects that can be discussed with a child while reading it--the moral aspects. However, there are more sophisticated topics in there that only the adults get. I noticed that about 20 years ago Disney animated movies started throwing in elements to their movies specifically with the adults in mind--little things that went right over the kids' heads. Considering that I had to sit through these movies repeatedly I was thankful for Disney's consideration of us. And I thoroughly enjoyed CATCF.
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Unread postby fansmom » Wed Mar 16, 2005 11:34 am

Liz wrote:I noticed that about 20 years ago Disney animated movies started throwing in elements to their movies specifically with the adults in mind--little things that went right over the kids' heads. Considering that I had to sit through these movies repeatedly I was thankful for Disney's consideration of us. And I thoroughly enjoyed CATCF.

Some time ago, I heard a Looney Tunes artist in an interview whether their cartoons were created for adults or children. His answer was, "We did them for ourselves." (Specifically the question was about the Looney Tunes "Rabbit of Seville." Really, what cartoon-watching child appreciates an homage to the "Barber of Seville"?) Do you think that's what Dahl did?

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Wed Mar 16, 2005 1:03 pm

fansmom wrote: Some time ago, I heard a Looney Tunes artist in an interview whether their cartoons were created for adults or children. His answer was, "We did them for ourselves." (Specifically the question was about the Looney Tunes "Rabbit of Seville." Really, what cartoon-watching child appreciates an homage to the "Barber of Seville"?) Do you think that's what Dahl did?


:rotflmao: I loved the Rabbit of Seville! And I used to love Animaniacs too! I think as an adult you couldn't help but write adult level material into your work. Maybe that is the mark of a good children's writer. The ability to write for both children and adults in the same story.
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Unread postby fansmom » Wed Mar 16, 2005 1:48 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote::rotflmao: I loved the Rabbit of Seville! And I used to love Animaniacs too! I think as an adult you couldn't help but write adult level material into your work.

My daughter commented recently that she now knows why I would watch some programs with her when she was younger, and not others. Those Animanics, because I was always mentally picturing the three of them as the Marx Brothers, and Orson Welles as the Brain. A cartoon called Recess because of an episode that parallels "Cool Hand Luke." PBS's Arthur because they named a segment after "Waiting for Godot."
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:[Maybe that is the mark of a good children's writer. The ability to write for both children and adults in the same story.

Sadly, there's also a lot of kid's stuff that never gets out of the shallow end of the pool, and as you said, DITHOT, that seems to be what separates the good from the not-so-good.

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Wed Mar 16, 2005 6:26 pm

Those Animanics, because I was always mentally picturing the three of them as the Marx Brothers, and Orson Welles as the Brain.


Absolutely! Osrson Wells as the Brain in Pinky and the Brain! I loved that show! :rotflmao:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!


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