C&TCF Tidbit #9: A not so brief history of chocolate

by Roald Dahl

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C&TCF Tidbit #9: A not so brief history of chocolate

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Thu Feb 10, 2005 9:35 am

While Liz has been providing us with her wonderful tidbits about Roald Dahl, I have been on a field trip doing candy research with Mr. Wonka at the Chocolate Factory.

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For the next several days I will be sharing what I have learned but I warn you this could be a high caloric week. I suggest you follow each tidbit with a bit of exercise...

A little aerobics:
:bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

A few jumping jacks
:disco: :disco: :disco: :disco: :disco: :disco: :disco: :disco: :disco: :disco:

And of course some Snoopy dancing:

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I suggest 10 reps of each exercise after each tidbit for the next several days!!! :rotflmao:

We will start our sugary exploration with a little history of chocolate and some fun chocolate trivia…




"Nine out of ten people like chocolate. The tenth person always lies."
John G Tullius (b. 1953) American artist and cartoonist




Chocolate…rich in history.

For centuries, chocolate has been an intricate part of the history of many countries. Historically, Chocolate has been used as both a type of currency and also as an indulgent drink affordable only to royalty. Today, chocolate is enjoyed by all in a variety of forms and continues to be an important part of many cultures.


7th Century A.D.

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Cocoa Beans as a Monetary Unit

Archeologists have discovered that Mayans cultivated these wild trees in the 7th century A.D in the Yucatan region of Central America.

The first cocoa trees grew wild in the tropical rainforests of the Amazon and Orinoco basins over 4,000 years ago.

Archeologists have discovered that Mayans cultivated these wild trees in the 7th century A.D in the Yucatan region of Central America.

Historians have found proof that cocoa beans were used as a form of payment as well as a unit of calculation around 1000 A.D. In fact, following that period, all taxes were paid in cocoa beans to Feudal Aztecs. Over the centuries, the people that would become known as "Indians" brewed cocoa from a dense paste made with roasted cocoa beans. With the addition of water and various spices (vanilla and cinnamon, but also pepper and other strong condiments) it became an expensive yet very popular beverage enjoyed by Kings, while the poorest used it sparingly to flavor a boiled corn mixture.

Cocoa - a divine drink

Under the Aztec Emperor Montezuma, the drink made of cocoa beans was reserved for the male elite. "The divine drink, which builds up resistance and fights fatigue. A cup of this precious drink permits a man to walk for a whole day without food." - Aztec Emperor Montezuma (circa 1480 - 1520)

In 1502 Christopher Columbus was the first European to discover Cocoa beans upon landing in Nicaragua on his fourth voyage. While the natives used cocoa beans as currency and also as a delightful drink, there was no interest by Columbus and his entourage who were still searching for the sea route to India.

1500’s

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A beverage fit for a king

Hernan Cortez, who conquered part of Mexico in 1519, was intrigued by the idea cocoa as a means of payment, and establishes a cocoa plantation in the name of the Spanish crown to cultivate this new "money".

Later, Cortez took xocolatl, a drink made from cocoa beans, to Charles V's court in 1520. Cane sugar, in addition to or in place of traditional spices made cocoa a beverage that was sweet and agreeable to drink and caught the addition of the Spanish King. Word of the drink quickly spread throughout Spain.


1600’s and 1700’s

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From Spain to France

In 1615, the French became aware of the use of cocoa, a century after the first discovery of the chocolate drink by the Spanish court. Spanish princess Anna of Austria married French King Louis XIII who introduced, among other Spanish customs, the drinking of chocolate at the French court.

News of the drink spread throughout Europe in the 17th century by Italian and French merchants.

The first chocolate-houses open

In 1657 the first chocolate-house was opened in London by a Frenchman, popularizing the consumption of chocolate among many classes. As early as 1720, several coffee-houses of Florence and Venice are offering chocolate whose reputation reaches far beyond the country's borders.

Italian chocolatiers, now famous for the art of making chocolate, are becoming known throughout Europe for this
new art form. During this time, gianduja (hazelnut paste) becomes a popular sweet chocolate variation.

Chocolate as cure

During the 18th century, chocolate was used more for therapeutic qualities, such as prevention of stomach aches.

Introduction of chocolate to the United States did not occur until 1765 when John Hanan brought cocoa beans from the West Indies to Dorchester, Massachusetts, thinking that it might be useful for medicinal purposes. Together with Dr. James Baker, they start the first chocolate factory in North America, at first to manufacture remedies for illnesses. (Baker's chocolate still exists as a baking chocolate variety).

During the first half of the 19th century, several technological advances made chocolate easier to produce and more available to the masses.


1800’s

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Invention of the cocoa press

In 1828, Dutchman Hendrick Van Houten invented the cocoa press. This invention helped reduce the prices of cocoa even further and helped to improve the quality of the beverage by squeezing out part of the cocoa butter, (fat that naturally occurs in cocoa beans) and allowed the cocoa to be grounded more finely. From then on, drinking chocolate had more of the smooth consistency and the pleasing flavor it has today. Today, this process is known as "Dutching." The final product, Dutch chocolate, has a dark color and a mild taste.

The first chocolate bar

In 1847, Fry's chocolate factory in Bristol, England molded the first chocolate bar that was suitable for general consumption.

Milk chocolate was invented in 1879 by the Swiss Henri Nestlé and Daniel Peter


1900’s

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Industrialization

The industrialization of chocolate reduced the production costs and allowed all levels of society to enjoy chocolate. Children rapidly became a great market for chocolate makers. This started a trend of novelties with the 1923 launch of the Milky Way in by the American Frank Mars while his son invented the namesake bars, the Mars bar. At the same time, Milton Hershey, another American chocolate producer vastly expanded his chocolate sales through clever marketing and capitalizing on impulse purchases of chocolate in main street grocery stores. Hershey was called the "Henry Ford" of chocolate because he mass-produced a quality chocolate bar at a price everyone could afford.


Today

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The chocolate industry has grown to a worldwide industry topping $50 Billion in retail sales worldwide and continues to show healthy growth. Recently, there has been an increasing trend towards high quality chocolates such as chocolates with high cocoa content and or chocolates flavored with natural flavors and rich spices.


And now a little chocolate trivia. Did you know????

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• Chocolate is America's favorite flavor. A recent survey revealed that 52 percent of U.S. adults said they like chocolate best. The second favorite flavor was a tie (at 12 percent each) between berry flavors and vanilla.

• U.S. chocolate manufacturers currently use 40 percent of the almonds produced in the United States and 25 percent of domestic peanuts.

• U.S. chocolate manufacturers use about 3.5 million pounds of whole milk every day to make chocolate.

• Sixty-five percent of American chocolate eaters prefer milk chocolate.

• The melting point of cocoa butter is just below the human body temperature (98.6 degrees) — which is why it literally melts in your mouth.

• The first "chocolate box" was introduced by Richard Cadbury in 1868, when he decorated a candy box with a painting of his young daughter holding a kitten in her arms. Cadbury also invented the first Valentine's Day candy box.

• Older children are significantly more likely to prefer chocolate than younger children (59 percent of 9-11year-olds prefer chocolate vs. 46 percent of 6-8 year-olds), according to an NCA survey.

• Here are some record-winning chocolates, according to the Guinness Book of World Records:
o The largest chocolate bar ever manufactured weighed 5,026 lbs. and was exhibited by Elah-Dufour United Food Companies at Eurochocolate in Turin, Italy in March 2000.

o The largest box of chocolates ever made was a Frango mint chocolates box weighing 3,226 lbs. created by Marshall Field's, Chicago, Illinois, USA on November 14, 2002. The box contained 90,090 individual chocolates.

o On April 4, 1996, the Rotary Club of Piet Retief, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, made a chocolate and marshamallow Easter egg which was just over 25-ft high. The egg weighed 8,968 lbs. and was supported by an internal steel frame.

o The Northwest Fudge Factory in Ontario, Canada, created a slab of fudge that weighed 2,002 lbs, making it the record-holding largest slab of fudge. The chocolate-and-vanilla-swirl fudge measured 166 ft. long, 9 in. wide and 3 in. high. The fudge took a total of 86 hours to prepare and 13 individuals to pour it into shape.


• On his fourth voyage to the New World, in 1502,
Christopher Columbus was the first European to taste chocolate.

• Americans eat about 10 pounds of chocolate a year per capita.
The Swiss eat 22 pounds per year.

• In Hershey, Pennsylvania, the streetlights along "Chocolate Avenue"
are in the shape of Hershey Kisses.
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• A 1.5 oz. milk chocolate bar has only 220 calories. A 1.75 oz. serving of potato chips has 230 calories.

• Chocolate in a blue wrapper won't sell in Shanghai or Hong Kong
because the Chinese associate blue with death.

• Casanova, fond of chocolate's divine properties, considered it an elixer of love.

• Queen Victoria was such a devotee that she sent five-hundred-thousand pounds of chocolate to her troops one Christmas.

• Chocolate's scientific name, Theobroma, means food of the gods.

• Montezuma, the last Aztec ruler, personally consumed some fifty "pitchers"of chocolate drink each day and had two thousand "pitchers" prepared for members of his household.

• Chocolate syrup was used to represent blood in the famous 45 second shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock's movie, "Psycho" a scene which took 7 days to shoot.
Sources: http://www.candyusa.org/Classroom/Facts ... =Chocolate!
http://home.earthlink.net/~wallerdesign/trivia.html
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Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby Liz » Thu Feb 10, 2005 10:40 am

What a well balanced tidbit, DITHOT! A little chocolate, a little aerobics and much entertainment. Great way to start the day! :cool:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby es » Thu Feb 10, 2005 11:18 am

intresting but most of all makes me want to go to the shop for a really big chocaletbar.
es

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Thu Feb 10, 2005 12:24 pm

es wrote: intresting but most of all makes me want to go to the shop for a really big chocaletbar.


I know the feeling, es. I think I gained 10 pounds just doing the research! :censored: :rotflmao: Just remember to do your exercises!

:bounce: :disco: Image
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby Liz » Thu Feb 10, 2005 2:08 pm

Chocolate may have some healthy side effects, according to this article:

From http://ksbw-tvhealth.ip2m.com/index.cfm ... e_Cat_ID=1

Chocolate: A Boon for the Libido and the Heart

By Mark Bloom
HealthDay Reporter

December 27, 2004 10:31 AM

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(HealthDay News) -- Chocolate. It's on everyone's wish list. And for good reason.

There's something about chocolate, something beyond tactile taste that is indefinable, ineffable and inexpressible.

And as the medical reviews keep coming in, there's evidence that chocolate may meet a variety of needs, from the libido to the heart.

The most recent finding has an Italian researcher saying he has found an association between eating chocolate and sexual fulfillment. Women who love chocolate, he says, seem to have better love lives. And that comes on top of earlier research that chocolate -- at least dark chocolate -- may be good for your heart.

Chocolate seems to straddle the line between a food and a beneficial medicine. Even the conventional wisdom that chocolate is related to acne has been challenged. Its chemical properties are complicated. Chocolate contains more than 300 substances, including caffeine in small quantities, and theobromine, a weaker stimulant. Some contend that these two chemicals form the basis of the much-touted chocolate high, postulating that they increase activity of key neurotransmitters. The stimulant phenylethylamine, which is related chemically to amphetamines, is also in chocolate.

Chocolate seems to make the mood more fulfilling, said Dr. Andrea Salonia, an Italian researcher, who was to report on the link he found between satisfying sex and chocolate at the annual meeting of the European Society for Sexual Medicine in December in London.

Salonia's group at the San Raffaele Hospital in Milan had 153 women fill out standard female sexual function questionnaires, among other lifestyle and psychological indices. The women were between 26 and 44 years old, with a median age of 35. It turned out that 120 women, average age 35, reported they ate chocolate frequently, compared with 33 women whose average age was 40.4.

Both overall sexual function and sexual desire were significantly greater among the chocolate-eaters than among those in the older group who were more likely to spurn chocolate, said Salonia.

Calling it "an intriguing correlation," Salonia indicated nevertheless that dalliance between chocolate and sex was far from a sure thing. "It seems alluring to hypothesize that chocolate can have a physiological positive impact over women's sexuality." But he added that the age difference, an important factor in sexuality, was also significant between the groups.

The Italian study merely adds a new chapter to the history of chocolate. It's loaded with myths and legends and unsubstantiated claims. One of those myths is that chocolate can contribute to acne, according to two seminal studies. The National Institutes of Health now states that "despite the popular belief that chocolate, nuts and other foods cause acne, this does not seem to be true."

In one of the studies, at the University of Pennsylvania, a group of acne patients was given a bar of "chocolate" liquor (the substance that's the base for all chocolate products) resembling a chocolate bar and had 28 percent vegetable fat to imitate the fat content of chocolate liquor and cocoa butter. Another group got real chocolate in a test bar with almost 10 times as much chocolate liquor as a normal 1.4 ounce bar. The acne neither improved nor worsened with chocolate or placebo.

In the other study, 80 midshipmen with acne at the U.S. Naval Academy were divided into chocolate abstainers and chocolate-eaters. After a month, careful observation showed no changes in their acne.

Finally, a recent small clinical study of the effects of the substance in rich dark chocolate known as flavonoids has been shown to improve indicators of a healthy heart, seen both by ultrasound measurements and blood levels. Other researchers have pointed to high levels of chemicals in chocolate known as phenolics, also found in red wine, as antioxidants that might help prevent coronary heart disease.

You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Veronica » Thu Feb 10, 2005 2:14 pm

the doctor told my bf to eat dark chacolate everyday. He buys those mini hershey bars.
Everything is always okay in the end,
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Unread postby suec » Thu Feb 10, 2005 2:16 pm

Well, it's good to know that chocolate has such benefits, as I think I could account for a great big slab of the 50 billion sales world wide! However, now I've given it up for a while. I can't just reduce as I still having the cravings then; I need to stop altogether, and get the figure back. :goodvibes:
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Unread postby MyManDepp » Thu Feb 10, 2005 2:34 pm

I have 3 small pieces of dark chocolate daily for medicinal purposes only ;-)

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Unread postby es » Thu Feb 10, 2005 3:45 pm

deepintheheartoftexas,did your research also find out who the wise guy was who tought of mixing chocalet and cookies?
(i really would like to know,cause i am his biggest[ :-? ]fan)
greets,
es

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Unread postby lizbet » Thu Feb 10, 2005 4:09 pm

well, I'm away from my computer for a little over 24 and what do I find when I come back: CHOCOLATE!!! thank you DITHT - and yes even as I'm typing this I'm doing toe exercises under my desk :bounce:
what great info - who knew - but there's just one thing - do you ladies know what 10 pounds looks like - think of the last bag of potatoes you lugged home from the grocery store - yes siree, Robert's your uncle Fanny's your aunt - now image that as 10 pounds of chocolate not tadders, precious!!! :bounce:
think I better go get a cold glass of milk to wash down all this talk of chocolate :bounce:
trying to live in "a profound state of ignorance"

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Unread postby surfmom » Fri Feb 11, 2005 2:44 am

The article Liz shared is accurate, chocolate does have health benefits…. In fact, check out these quotes:

“Chocolate causes certain endocrine glands to secrete hormones that affect your feelings and behavior by making you happy. Therefore, it counteracts depression, in turn reducing the stress of depression. Your stress-free life helps you maintain a youthful disposition, both physically and mentally. So, eat lots of chocolate!” Elaine Sherman, Book of Divine Indulgences

”Researchers have discovered that chocolate produced some of the same reactions in the brain as marijuana. The researchers also discovered other similarities between the two, but can't remember what they are.” Matt Lauer on NBC's Today Show, August 22

“I have this theory that chocolate slows down the aging process.... It may not be true, but do I dare take the chance?” unknown

Haha!!

And then who can deny the pure sensuality of this candy with benefits: “... the taste of chocolate is a sensual pleasure in itself, existing in the same world as sex... For myself, I can enjoy the wicked pleasure of chocolate... entirely by myself. Furtiveness makes it better.” Dr. Ruth Westheimer

And finally,
Life without chocolate is like a beach without water……or a wave without a surfboard.
:-)

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Unread postby Liz » Fri Feb 11, 2005 3:58 am

All this chocolate talk is driving me crazy. :drool: I thought I only did this over Johnny and DH. Now you all probably remember this pic.

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Well, this week I found out there is a new drink at Starbucks called Chantico, which is being touted as "decadent". And it looks just like this pic--the drink that Vianne serves Roux. Has anyone tried it yet?

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You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby truelymadlydepply » Fri Feb 11, 2005 4:07 am

es wrote:deepintheheartoftexas,did your research also find out who the wise guy was who tought of mixing chocalet and cookies?
(i really would like to know,cause i am his biggest[ :-? ]fan)
greets,
es


what about the genius who invented Baileys liqueur
chocolate
alcohol
coffee and
sugar
and cream :cloud9:
excellent combination
"One time he, (Marlon Brando), says to me: 'How many films do you do a year?' I said, 'I dunno. Two or three.' He says, 'You've got to watch yourself. We've only got so many faces in our pocket.' "

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Fri Feb 11, 2005 9:18 am

trulymadlydepply wrote: what about the genius who invented Baileys liqueur
chocolate
alcohol
coffee and
sugar
and cream :cloud9:
excellent combination


Have you tried putting it in the freezer? :cloud9: :cloud9:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby fansmom » Fri Feb 11, 2005 2:44 pm

Liz wrote:Well, this week I found out there is a new drink at Starbucks called Chantico, which is being touted as "decadent". And it looks just like this pic--the drink that Vianne serves Roux. Has anyone tried it yet?


After reading the nutrition information on the Starbucks website--NEVER!

Chantico™ Drinking Chocolate A drinkable dessert with an intense, full-bodied chocolate flavor and silky, rich texture.
Serving Size 6 fl. oz.
Calories 390
Fat Calories 190
Total Fat (g) 21

And if it's "to die for," I don't want to know about it! I've been doing Weight Watchers, and am currently eating vegetable soup and yogurt, and these threads are "keeling" me!


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