FI Question #18: Shall we dance?

by Tom Robbins

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nebraska
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Unread postby nebraska » Thu Jan 20, 2005 10:14 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:Surfmom good to know he is in fine form in Villa Incognito as well since that is next on my Robbins list of reads. I love starting one of his long descriptive sentences, or paragraphs, because you never know where you are going to wind up! A maze is a good description Gypsylee.

Here are few more of my favorites, a bit more along the lines of favorite descriptive passages:

"the sea was the shade of blue that black could have been if it hadn't stepped over the line."

"A straggler, a solitary traveler, the last and final raindrop of the morning--unappologetically tardy, even arrogant as if on an independet mission its meekly conforming confederates could not possibly appreciate or understand--landed on the back of Switter's neck and rolled languidly, defiantly down his spine."

"There, white chickens scratched white chicked poetry into the sad bare earth, and a trio of pigs squealed and grunted, as if in endless protest against a world that tolerated bacon."



DITHOT, the chickens and pigs description was one of my favorites also. The white chickens scratching white chicken poetry into the sad bare earth -- I love it!

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Unread postby nebraska » Thu Jan 20, 2005 10:25 pm

I absolutely love Robbins' style. I love words, the more eloquent and complicated the better, the more artsy and descriptive and .. well, I love words and I have never read an author who writes the way Robbins does. He would not have to be making sense, he would not have to be telling a story, I would read his book anyway just for the sheer delight of the words!!

That said, apart from the way he can string fancy words together, apart from the lovely descriptive passages, sometimes he came up with a really important thought. Come to think of it, we hit on this topic yesterday but from a little different angle.

Page 22, discussing why people like movies with explosions and such:

" Freedom from the material world. Subconscioulsy, people feel trapped by our culture's confining buildings and its relentless avalanche of consumer goods. So, when they watch all this stuff (sic) being demolished in a totally irreverent and devil-may-care fashion, the experience the kind of release the Greeks used to get from their tragedies ..... Things attach themselves like leeches to the human soul, then they bleed out the sweetness and the music and the primordial joy of being unencumbered upon the land. Comprende? People feel tremendous pressure to settle down in some sort of permanent space and fill it up with stuff, but deep inside they resent those structures, and they're scared to death of that stuff because they know it controls them and restricts their movements. That's why they relish the boom-boom cinema."

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Thu Jan 20, 2005 10:31 pm

nebraska, are you a mind reader? :-O You all might want to read the passage she quoted because it just might turn up really soon in a question... :-)
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby Liz » Thu Jan 20, 2005 11:58 pm

I hate that I've been away all day and haven't been able to spend some time here until now. Great choices everyone! Some of my favorites have already been shared. I have some little passages that either tickled me, amazed me, shocked me or made me think. And now that I'm finding them I'm thinking most of them would have applied to some of the previous questions:

Wham, bam, thank you, Saddam!

At the very least, he was learning that for some Western women--even pious ones--middle age needn't necessarily mean dowdiness, torpor, or capitulation. I give him 10 points for this one. :thumbsup:

"I'm Switters, friend of both God and the Devil." Then, getting an uncertain reception, "Taker of the stepless step." Then, "Two-inch astronaut." :-O

The thing about death, though, is that it eliminates so many options. At least, in terms of the personality game. As long as I'm alive, there's always a chance that something extremely interesting will develop from all this. Who can guess where it might eventually lead or what I might learn from it? Doesn't the infinite emerge from the fiasco? And any time I want to test it or bring it to resolution, that option is only two inches away. What's the big hurry? There may be red-eye gravy for dinner.

This one shocked me. :shocked: I will begin it and finish it but not share the middle due to the nature of it's contents:

Pg. 175. One moment he craved to give her a bath in his.......The next, he wished simply to kiss her toes.

I know there are many more........
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Fri Jan 21, 2005 12:16 am

liz wrote: "At the very least, he was learning that for some Western women--even pious ones--middle age needn't necessarily mean dowdiness, torpor, or capitulation." I give him 10 points for this one. :thumbsup:


I'll see your 10 and raise you 20! :capnjack:

The thing about death, though, is that it eliminates so many options. At least, in terms of the personality game. As long as I'm alive, there's always a chance that something extremely interesting will develop from all this. Who can guess where it might eventually lead or what I might learn from it?


Ain't that the truth! :bounce:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!

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Unread postby axelsgirl » Fri Jan 21, 2005 3:55 am

Sorry DITHOT, didn't mean to gross you out :grin: at least give me credit for not quoting the whole passage :eyebrow:
Veronica, that's cool that you really looked around you today and saw what was going on, it sure makes the day more interesting. When I get too busy and stressed I have to remind myself to slow down and look around and it sure makes the day go better.
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"Yeah, well, let's keep on truckin'!"

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Unread postby Larkwoodgirl » Fri Jan 21, 2005 8:20 am

"On the other hand, one had just enough loft so that one glided above the frantic strivings and petty discontents that preoccupied the earthbound, circumnavigating those dreary miasmas that threatened to bleach their hearts a single shade of gray. In short, one could be keenly interested in worldly matters yet remain serenely detached from their outcome."

I love this! This also supports detachment as one of the major themes of the book.
""We shall never cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time." T.S. Eliot

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Fri Jan 21, 2005 9:40 am

axelsgirl wrote: Sorry DITHOT, didn't mean to gross you out :grin: at least give me credit for not quoting the whole passage :eyebrow:


Some things are better left unsaid... :shhh:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!


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