Fierce Invalids Question #23 - Full of Neuroses

by Tom Robbins

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Liz
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Unread postby Liz » Wed Jan 26, 2005 11:38 am

Gypsylee wrote:
Liz wrote:
Charlene wrote:Well, experts always say write about what you know, so if you've got neurosises (es???), write about'em. Think it makes for alot more interesting reading, characters with more depth, unusual story lines, than reading (albeit well written books) stories with straight story lines situated in a well researched time period or perfectly written paragraphs.


Neurotic storylines (notice that I'm getting around having to use the plural form) definitely make more interesting reading--at least for me. On the other hand, intelligent writing, if done well, can be interesting. I think Robbins includes both in his writing.


The book Perfume comes to mind.........


Good example, Gypsylee!
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Liz » Wed Jan 26, 2005 6:09 pm

lumineuse wrote:
Liz wrote:
Charlene wrote:Liz, that it too funny. Has anyone ever picked up a copy of Finnegan's Wake? Is like old english and impossible to understand what they are saying?

Wow, that is such a good idea that young woman had to ward off men too impressed with themselves. What a riot.


This particular female character has a reputation for being sadistic. And I've never read Finnegan's Wake. I think I'll order it from the library.


I don't know if you've checked, Liz, but you can read excerpts from Finnegan's Wake at amazon. We had a discussion during the Tidbits about it, but unfortunatelythe discussion got lost in netherspace at about midstream. After reading the excerpts, I have to say I have no interest in reading the whole book. I'd love to know what you think.


OK, Lumineuse, you wanted to know what I thought. I got on Amazon and read a couple of pages. And now I know why the guy in my other book club book fell asleep. It's all a bunch of gibberish if you ask me.

In DITHOT’s tidbit she quotes the first line and the last line. Here is a sampling of in-between for those who have not read any of Finnegan's Wake:


"The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoor-denenthurnuk!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all Christian minstrelsy. The great fall of the offwallentailed at such short notice the pftjschute of Finnegan, erse solid man, that the humptyhillhead of humself promptly sends and unquiring one well to the west in quest of his tumptytumtoes: and their upturnpikepointandplace is at the knock out in the park where oranges have been laid to rust upon the green since devlinsfirst loved livvy.

What clashes here of wills gen wonts, oystrygods gaggin fishy-gods! Brekkek Kékkek Kékkek Kékkek! Kóax Kóax Kóax! Ualu Ualu Ualu! Quaouauh! Where the Baddelaries partisans are still out to mathmaster Malachus Micgranes and the Verdons catapulting the camibalistics out of the Whoyteboyce of Hoodie Head. Assiegates and boomeringstroms. Dod’s brood, be me fear! Sanglorians, save! Arms appeal with larms, appalling. Killykillkilly: a toll, a toll. What chance cuddleys, what cashels aired and ventilated! What bidminetoloves sinduced by what tegotetabsolvers! What true feeling for their’s hayair with what strawng voice of false jiccup! O here here how hoth sprowled met the duskt the father of fornicationists but, (O my shining stars and body!) how hath fanespanned most high heaven the skysign of soft advertisement! But waz iz! Iseut! Ere were sewers! The oaks of ald now they lie in peat yet elms leap where askes lay. Phall if you but will, rise you must: and none so soon either shall the pharce for the nunce come to a setdown secular phoenish."
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Wed Jan 26, 2005 10:43 pm

l
iz wrote: Here is a sampling of in-between for those who have not read any of Finnegan's Wake:

"The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoor-denenthurnuk!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all Christian minstrelsy. The great fall of the offwallentailed at such short notice the pftjschute of Finnegan, erse solid man, that the humptyhillhead of humself promptly sends and unquiring one well to the west in quest of his tumptytumtoes: and their upturnpikepointandplace is at the knock out in the park where oranges have been laid to rust upon the green since devlinsfirst loved livvy.


Yes, well, enough said I believe!!! If anyone out there has read or studied or made sense of Finnegan's Wake my hat is off to you! Special kudos for Liz for typing all that! :hypnotic:
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Unread postby fansmom » Wed Jan 26, 2005 10:57 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:Yes, well, enough said I believe!!! If anyone out there has read or studied or made sense of Finnegan's Wake my hat is off to you! Special kudos for Liz for typing all that! :hypnotic:


Wow, I was hoping Liz had done a cut-and-paste job. No one should have to type that.

The reviews of Finnegan's Wake on Amazon are a lot more fun to read than the excerpt is.

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Unread postby Liz » Thu Jan 27, 2005 3:29 am

fansmom wrote:
DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:Yes, well, enough said I believe!!! If anyone out there has read or studied or made sense of Finnegan's Wake my hat is off to you! Special kudos for Liz for typing all that! :hypnotic:


Wow, I was hoping Liz had done a cut-and-paste job. No one should have to type that.

The reviews of Finnegan's Wake on Amazon are a lot more fun to read than the excerpt is.


I did have to type that. I've never been able to copy any pics or text from the book excerpts on Amazon. It won't let me. :banghead: I didn't think to read the reviews. :lol: I'm headed over there now.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Unread postby Larkwoodgirl » Thu Jan 27, 2005 8:42 pm

suec wrote:I don't think intellects and neuroses are mutually exclusive. Doesn't :capnjack: have something to say about that one? Along similar lines, anyway.


I completely agree with you. They are not mutually exclusive. The classic example of this point is Woody Allen. He is obviously a talented and brilliant guy who writes from his neuroses as well as lives them.

I actually like some of the things he has written.

I think there is plenty of room from books that are written from both the intellectual perspective and the neurotic perspective.
""We shall never cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time." T.S. Eliot

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Unread postby lumineuse » Fri Jan 28, 2005 9:28 pm

Just as a Finnegan's Wakeian point of interest: I took Tom Robbins up on his recommendation to read Joseph Campbell's Masks of God books (which I find fascinating, BTW, but I hava a huge interest in comparative mythology/religion). Anyway - I noticed that Campbell wrote a book called A Skeleton Key to Finnegan's Wake. I checked it out on amazon. Apparently it is out of print because they had used copies starting at around $65, but the reviews were very positive. Kind of makes me wonder if Robbin's didn't use Campbell in his Finnegan's Wake reading, since he considers the Masks of God to be required reading for enlightenment.
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Unread postby lumineuse » Fri Jan 28, 2005 9:32 pm

suec wrote:

I don't think intellects and neuroses are mutually exclusive. Doesn't :capnjack: have something to say about that one? Along similar lines, anyway.


Good catch, suec! It's remarkable how often those traits coincide!!!!
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Unread postby suec » Mon Jan 31, 2005 8:16 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:l
iz wrote: Here is a sampling of in-between for those who have not read any of Finnegan's Wake:

"The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoor-denenthurnuk!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all Christian minstrelsy. The great fall of the offwallentailed at such short notice the pftjschute of Finnegan, erse solid man, that the humptyhillhead of humself promptly sends and unquiring one well to the west in quest of his tumptytumtoes: and their upturnpikepointandplace is at the knock out in the park where oranges have been laid to rust upon the green since devlinsfirst loved livvy.


Yes, well, enough said I believe!!! If anyone out there has read or studied or made sense of Finnegan's Wake my hat is off to you! Special kudos for Liz for typing all that! :hypnotic:


I tried to do some research on it, because it is a motif in the book, and I couldn't understand why. It was really bugging me. I mean, why keep on referring to it in so many different contexts so often? I thought it must be significant.
I was wasting my time. I mean, it is designed to be obscure, if not impenetrable. I found out one or intriguing bits and bobs, though. For instance, Joyce described himself thus: " I am only an Irish clown, a great joker at the universe". That rang a few bells, obviously. As did the revelation in one interpretation that middle-aged male interest in a young girl is an element. But these details didn't really hit the spot, for me. If you can't understand what you are reading and need it all explaining to you, what is the point?
In the end, I think the reason he refers to it so often is because it is so obscure. "Ultimate mysteries remain ultimately mysterious" and all that. I think that may be why Switters starts reading it instead of the Bible. But that is just a guess. I'm not spending any more time on it, anyway. I'm no fan, either.
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Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Mon Jan 31, 2005 9:57 pm

suec wrote: In the end, I think the reason he refers to it so often is because it is so obscure. "Ultimate mysteries remain ultimately mysterious" and all that. I think that may be why Switters starts reading it instead of the Bible. But that is just a guess. I'm not spending any more time on it, anyway. I'm no fan, either.


Thanks for your effort suec. Maintaining the ultimate mystery would make it right up Switters alley wouldn't it? Appealing to the absurd? The CRAFT Club seemed more interested in drinking the Irish whiskey than ever getting to the bottom of FW anyway. :lol: :hypnotic:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!


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