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 Post subject: A Walk Through Kensington Gardens with JMB
PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 9:28 am 
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Sit back an enjoy a tour of Kensington Gardens with another of our ace reporters in the field, Still-Rather-Timid! :press: If you are one of the lucky ones and have seen Finding Neverland, you will recognize some spots along the way. :-O If not, come back and visit again after you see the movie. Thank you srt for sharing your trip with us and for your time spent in putting it together! :cool:

Now use your imagination and Believe!


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A Grand Tour of Kensington Gardens with J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan, Johnny Depp, and Me (Still-Rather-Timid)

“You must see for yourselves that it will be difficult to follow Peter Pan’s adventures unless you are familiar with the Kensington Gardens.”

So begins J. M. Barrie’s “The Grand Tour of the Gardens,” the introductory chapter of
“Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens,” a work that Barrie published as a separate novella in 1906—after the 1904 premiere staging of the play Peter Pan--but whose content originally appeared in 1902 as part of Barrie’s larger work, The Little White Bird, which contains the germ of Peter Pan. Kensington Gardens is the real park in London where in 1897 J. M. Barrie really met the Llewelyn Davies boys; its real meadows, groves, lakes and walks are the landscape that Barrie imaginatively transformed into the fictional world of Neverland; and it is the real setting where the outdoor park scenes of Finding Neverland were filmed. So if you have seen Finding Neverland (or if you live in London), you are already somewhat familiar with Kensington Gardens.

I have not seen the film yet, but I have been in love with Kensington Gardens since I first strolled down its enchanted walks on a sunny Sunday morning in 1983, looking for the famous statue of Peter Pan. Since then I have returned to London many times, often taking my English literature students on tour, and always staying within a 5 minute walk of the Gardens, because there is nothing more wonderful than getting up early in the morning and walking through them, watching people push their baby carriages down the shady paths, or play with their dogs on the dewy grass, sparkling in the slanting morning sunlight—oh, except perhaps crossing the park again just before sunset, with the swans gliding majestically on the Round Pond in the purple-blue haze, and the orange light fading in back of Kensington Palace. And now, if I live until Thanksgiving Weekend without having a heart attack, I will see Johnny Depp on the big screen, weaving his magic in what for me has always been the already magical world of Kensington Gardens, and with a Scottish accent, even!

My last real trip to the Gardens was 6 months ago. In May, 2004, anticipating the release of Finding Neverland and therefore armed with a digital camera this time (and dragging along 7 students who had been primed by reading “Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens”), I took the following photographs in Kensington Gardens. They are inspired by and in turn illustrate details from several sources: Barrie’s 1906 novella “Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens,” Andrew Birkin’s biography of J.M. Barrie, J. M. Barrie and the Lost Boys, and press reports of Johnny Depp’s picnicking in the Gardens when he was filming there in June 2002. I took these pictures with the intent of sharing them with the Zone, and gleefully thought about tracing Johnny’s footsteps with every photo I snapped.

We start at the house at Leinster corner, to which Barrie moved in 1902. He had already met the Llewelyn Davies boys in Kensington Gardens, and begun weaving the stories about the Peter Pan character that formed a portion of The Little White Bird and later the play Peter Pan. Moving to this house made the Gardens easily accessible to Barrie, for they are right across the street!

The first picture is a rear view of Barrie’s house on the corner of Leinster Terrace and the large, busy thoroughfare, Bayswater Road.

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We are walking south on Leinster Terrace toward the corner of Bayswater. A slightly closer shot of the back of the house

Image shows the rear window of what was supposedly Barrie’s study. The next view

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is of the front of the house, which is on Bayswater Road; and a second view of the front of the house

Image shows more clearly its “Blue Plaque,” one of the circular plaques identifying houses in London once inhabited by famous writers and artists.

At this point in our “tour,’ I was reading to my students from “The Grand Tour of the Gardens,” and deliberately stopping to photograph sights that illustrated Barrie’s whimsical narrative. He writes:

“The Gardens are bounded on one side by a never-ending line of omnibuses, over which your nurse has such authority that if she holds up her finger to any one of them it stops immediately. She then crosses with you in safety to the other side.”

The next two shots show the busy street running in front of Barrie’s house and separating him from the Gardens.

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When leading my group across Bayswater Road, I tried holding up my finger, but my students found it much safer to wait for the traffic light.

Bayswater Road runs along the north perimeter of the Gardens, but the hedge serves as an effective buffer against the busy street.

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Almost directly across the street from the house is Lancaster Gate, one of the many entrances through the thick hedge and wrought-iron fence into Kensington Gardens.

Barrie writes:

“There are more gates to the Gardens than one gate, but that is the one you go in at, and before you go in you speak to the lady with the balloons, who sits just outside.”

We did not see the lady with the balloons, but I think the next two pictures are of the Gate Barrie describes; it is the one nearest his house.

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Barrie describes what the Gardens look like once you cross through the gate:

“The Gardens are a tremendous big place, with millions and hundreds of trees.”

Here are some views of the trees and paths of the Gardens:

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These pictures and some of the others give you an idea of how many inviting paths crisscross the Gardens: big, wide, central paths that traverse the whole park from north to south and narrower shady paths that wind their way into deep hidden groves.


Here is a picture of one of the larger paths, lined by those benches on which you see Johnny and Freddie Highmore sitting in the film

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I think this actual path is featured in the film, but with the statue at the end edited out.

Barrie writes from a child’s viewpoint of the paths, in his “Tour”:

“We are now in the Broad Walk, and it is as much bigger than the other walks as your father is bigger than you. David wondered if it began little, and grew and grew, until it was quite grown up, and whether the other walks are its babies, and he drew a picture, which diverted him very much, of the Broad Walk giving a tiny walk an airing in a perambulator.”

The Broad Walk is the largest of these walks; it goes straight from north to south, all the way through the park, and cuts between the Round Pond and Kensington Palace. Kensington Palace is where Queen Victoria was born. Mimicking the Victorian child who would associate the Palace with stories of Victoria’s birth and girlhood, and how she suddenly became Queen of England when she was 18, Barrie’s narrator refers to it as the “Baby’s Palace,” and to the imposing statue of the young queen in front of the Palace as the “Big Penny,” because he would recognize the image of Victoria that he has seen on pennies:

“You now try to go to the Round Pond, but nurses hate it, because they are not really manly, and they make you look the other way, at the Big Penny and the Baby's Palace. She was the most celebrated baby of the Gardens, and lived in the palace all alone, with ever so many dolls, so people rang the bell, and up she got out of her bed, though it was past six o'clock, and she lighted a candle and opened the door in her nighty, and then they all cried with great rejoicings, ' Hail, Queen of England I ' What puzzled David most was how she knew where the matches were kept. The Big Penny is a statue about her.”

Here is a picture of the statue of Victoria and Kensington Palace, taken while I am standing in the Broad Walk. The Round Pond is directly behind me.

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The Round Pond is the huge round pond on the other side of the Broad Walk from Kensington Palace. It is really big, and Barrie describes it as an irresistible temptation for children and a trial for their nannies:

“I shall pass on hurriedly to the Round Pond, which is the wheel that keeps all the gardens going.

It is round because it is in the very middle of the Gardens, and when you are come to it you never want to go any farther. You can't be good all the time at the Round Pond, however much you try. You can be good in the Broad Walk all the time, but not at the Round Pond, and the reason is that you forget, and, when you remember, you are so wet that you may as well be wetter. There are men who sail boats on the Round Pond, such big boats that they bring them in barrows, and sometimes in perambulators, and then the baby has to walk. The bow-legged children in the Gardens are those who had to walk too soon because their father needed the perambulator.

Paths from everywhere crowd like children to the pond. Some of them are ordinary paths, which have a rail on each side, and are made by men with their coats off, but others are vagrants, wide at one spot, and at another so narrow that you can stand astride them. They are called Paths that have Made Themselves, and David did wish he could see them doing it. But, like all the most wonderful things that happen in the Gardens, it is done, we concluded, at night after the gates are closed. We have also decided that the paths make themselves because it is their only chance of getting to the Round Pond.”

Here is a picture that attempts to capture the sheer size of the Round Pond

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And here are pictures of typical parkgoers gathered at the Round Pond, feeding the waterfowl and holding tightly to the hands of their tempted children!

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Barrie amusingly describes the whole park as a place where children are inspired to get into all sorts of naughty adventures and their nannies continually have to rein them in:

“Returning up the Broad Walk we have on our right the Baby Walk, which is so full of perambulators that you could cross from side to side stepping on babies, but the nurses won't let you do it.”

Birkin describes the Llewelyn Davies children’s nurse, Mary Hodgson: “She brought to her role a measure of the traditional nanny, and walks in Kensington Gardens soon became a daily routine.” (p. 54)

When I took a group to Kensington Gardens in 2001, my administrative assistant very politely asked a nanny who was wheeling a very picturesque child in a very picturesque, old-fashioned baby buggy if she could take the child’s picture and here you have an image that could almost have come from Barrie’s day!

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Incidentally, the “Baby Walk,” running along the south side of the Gardens, is really called the “Flower Walk,” and is a shady path flanked by some of the most gorgeous beds of flowers I’ve ever seen.

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Not far from The Broad Walk are two curious stone markers. They are the subject of not only a conversation between the real George Llewelyn Davies and Barrie, but also a rather macabre flight of Barrie’s imagination in “Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens.”
Birkin reports:

“During one of their walks with Barrie, George Llewelyn Davies noticed a pair of grey stones engraved ‘W. St. M.’ and ‘13a P. P. 1841.’ These were boundary stones still in existence today, marking the various parish boundaries within Kensington Gardens. The initials on this particular pair marked the boundary between the Parish of Westminster St. Mary’s and the Parish of Paddington. George asked Barrie what they were for, and his explanation was somewhat more exotic.” (pp. 68-69)

Here is what the two stone markers become in Barrie’s fiction; this is how “Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens” ends, with a fantasy of what happens to babies who fall unnoticed out of their nannies’ perambulators, if Peter Pan doesn’t rescue them in time:
“But you must not think that . . . it is a safe thing to remain in the Gardens after Lock-out time. If the bad ones among the fairies happen to be out that night they will certainly mischief you, and even though they are not, you may perish of cold and dark before Peter Pan comes round. He has been too late several times, and when he sees he is too late he runs back to the Thrush’s Nest for his paddle, of which Maimie had told him the true use, and he digs a grave for the child and erects a little tombstone, and carves the poor thing’s initials on it. He does this at once because he thinks it is what real boys would do, and you must have noticed the little stones, and that there are always two together. He puts them in twos because they seem less lonely. I think that quite the most touching sight in the Gardens is the two tombstones of Walter Stephen Matthews and Phœbe Phelps. They stand together at the spot where the parish of Westminster St Mary’s is said to meet the Parish of Paddington. Here Peter found the two babes, who had fallen unnoticed from their perambulators, Phœbe aged thirteen months and Walter probably still younger, for Peter seems to have felt a delicacy about putting any age on his stone. They lie side by side, and the simple inscriptions read—
W. St. M. and 13a P. P. 1841.
David sometimes places white flowers on these two innocent graves.
But how strange for parents, when they hurry into the Gardens at the opening of the gates looking for their lost one, to find the sweetest little tombstone instead. I do hope that Peter is not too ready with his spade. It is all rather sad.”

Here are two photographs of the “tombstones.” For no wonder the mother in the background has got a tight grip on her two babes!

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One of my favorite things to see in the Gardens is the statue of Peter Pan. Birkin describes its genesis:
“Sir George Frampton’s statue of Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens. The statue, commissioned and paid for by Barrie, was erected in secrecy during the night of April 30, 1912, so that May morning strollers might conceive that it had appeared by magic. . . . Although Barrie’s 1906 photographs of Michael [Llewelyn Davies] had been the inspiration for the statue, Frampton had used another boy, James W. Shaw, as a model, and Barrie was dissatisfied with the results. ‘It doesn’t show the Devil in Peter,’ he complained.”
I always bring my students to the statue. Here is the walk that leads to it

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And the sign at its base:

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Some older children and their father examine the statue

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An adorable blond tyke becomes entranced by the statue
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And I get a good close up of him in his fascination

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Thank god he’s not Jack Depp or my head would be broken!

A view of the Peter Pan statue from farther away

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And here is mention of the statue in a news story about a certain actor:

“While Johnny's filming his latest movie, Neverland, Johnny, 39, Vanessa 29,
and their children Lily Rose three, and three-month old Jack spent time
playing together in Kensington Gardens and visited the famous Peter Pan
statue there. They found the statue and looked at it for a long time said a
passer-by. Then they sat down for a picnic." (Vicki’s Newsletter # 70)

I examined the whole site around the statue, and tried to figure out where a family could have a picnic without drawing too much attention. In this picture, our little blond friend has decided to take a nap; in back of him is the only area in the clearing around the statue where you could have a semi-private picnic. Behind the little stand of bushes, a celebrity could sit with his back to the entrance to the statue area and eat a sandwich without being recognized. If a family occupied this slightly annexed area, others would not enter it.

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A scene in Finding Neverland has the child Peter Llewelyn Davies declaring that Barrie is the real Peter Pan. Okay, so if Barrie is the real Peter Pan and Depp is Barrie, that makes Depp Peter Pan, and perhaps explains this shot of Wendy examining what Peter wears “beneath his kilt,” so to speak:

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The girl looks pleased by what she finds.

Here are some more pictures of the statue and its whimsical details:

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Right across the path from the statue is a body of water called “The Serpentine,” probably because it snakes through the east end of the Gardens. It doesn’t look nearly so romantic in my picture as Barrie describes it in “Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens”:

“The Serpentine begins near here. It is a lovely lake, and there is a drowned forest at the bottom of it. If you peer over the edge you can see the trees all growing upside down, and they say that at night there are also drowned stars in it. If so, Peter Pan sees them when he is sailing across the lake in the Thrush's Nest. A small part only of the Serpentine is in the Gardens, for soon it passes beneath a bridge to far away where the island is on which all the birds are born that become baby boys and girls. No one who is human, except Peter Pan (and he is only half human), can land on the island, but you may write what you want (boy or girl, dark or fair) on a piece of paper, and then twist it into the shape of a boat and slip it into the water, and it reaches Peter Pan's island after dark.”

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But Johnny and his family probably hung over the fence and looked into the water, so that helps a little. Use your imagination!

I’ll close with a very sentimental, but charming little passage from The Little White Bird, which sums up the somewhat melancholy magic that Kensington Gardens held for Barrie, and perhaps for everyone who finds in the Gardens a joyful and timeless oasis. Andrew Birkin describes The Little White Bird as “narrated in the first person by Barrie, who thinly disguises himself as Captain W--, a ‘gentle, whimsical, lonely old bachelor,’ who happens to be a writer, given to long walks in Kensington Gardens with his St Bernard dog, Porthos” (p. 57). This Captain W., the narrator of The Little White Bird, longs for fatherhood, and even invents an imaginary son, Timothy, with whom he fantasizes about playing in Kensington Gardens. This passage from the Captain’s narration is quoted in Birkin, p. 58:

“I wished (so had the phantasy of Timothy taken possession of me) that before he went he could have played once in the Kensington Gardens, and have ridden on the fallen trees, calling gloriously to me to look; that he could have sailed one paper galleon on the Round Pond; fain would I have had him chase one hoop a little way down the laughing avenues of childhood, where memory tells us we run but once, on a long summer day, emerging at the other end as men and women with all the fun to pay for.”

And now, bring me that movie!!!

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Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 10:20 am 
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Oh, SRT, that was such a beautiful gift. It truly brought tears to my eyes. Thank you so much.



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 10:40 am 
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oooooooh, that was wonderful! :cloud9: :cloud9: thank you so much...
i felt closer to him...thanks again, that was...magic! :cloud9:



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...and all I can taste is this moment, and all I can breathe is your life..." - Iris
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 10:55 am 
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What an absolute delight! I saved the text and photos to my hard drive so I can revisit Kensington Gardens as often as I like! Thank you so much!!!!!


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 11:01 am 
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Wow! that was beautiful! What gorgeous photos and wonderful commentary!

Thank you Thank you Thank you for sharing this. It's made my day! :lilyrose: :lilyrose: :lilyrose:



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 11:11 am 
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SRT, I read this now for the first time because I wanted to wait for the final product. And what a final product! This tour was a wonderful gift you have given us. I appreciate the time it took you to write it up. And the pictures are beautiful. Its like looking at scenes from the movie sans Johnny, of course. The picture of the baby on the "baby walk" could very well be a century ago, if we didn't know better. What a beautiful, magical place! Thank you so much. :disco:



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The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 1:13 pm 
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Thank you so much, SRT!

I've really enjoyed my morning walk through the gardens, and yes, you brought tears to my eyes a couple of times. Lovely, indeed.



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"I feel sullied and unusual..."

"What do I want for the future? I know exactly what I want, everything: calm, peace, tranquillity, freedom, fun, happiness. If I could make all that one word, I would - a many-syllabled word."
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 Post subject: oh thank you
PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 1:27 pm 

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well done srt, and i too have a picture of me next to peter pan that my brothe took this summer. something so magical about the park, you feel transformed..very british. thanks for the tour.



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 1:33 pm 
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OH! I really loved that and I can truly say that i am now completely in love with that little blonde boy! He was so cute! Very nicely done srt. :cool:



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"My wife said to me, 'Do you know who I'd really like to play the detective?' I said, 'Who, darling?' knowing it would be me. And she said 'Johnny Depp!' I said, 'Thank you very much. That's nice'. - Ewan McGregor
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 4:50 pm 
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SRT ~ Thank you so much for that wonderful tour of Kensington Gardens. Your photographs are beautiful, as is your lovely narration to go along with them. I really enjoyed the tour! :cloud9:



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"So we shall let the reader answer this question for himself, who is the happier man, he who has braved the storm of life and lived or he who has stayed securely on the shore and merely existed." ~HST~
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 5:05 pm 
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That was wonderful, thank you so much for putting that together. I live in London but I'm not sure I've ever actually been to Kensington Gardens. I've been to St James' and Hyde Park but never got around to that one. Next time I venture into town I'll definitely take a look, it's beautiful.

Janine



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 7:09 pm 
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Isn't it a beautiful walk in the park? :cloud9: Thanks srt for sharing your lovely writing and pictures with us! Makes me want to see it for myself... :-O



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Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 8:00 pm 

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:bounce: Thank you, DITHOT!!

I'm just seeing my tour of Kensington Gardens in its completed form for the first time, and DITHOT did a wonderful job of assembling the pictures and the text. It was all I could do, computerally speaking, to get the digital pictures dropped in her photobucket account (I'm one of those morons who hasn't even been able to get my own photobucket account to work for me), and then I wrote the text much later (kinda at the last minute, like I do everything), and we had a threatening-to-falter system of numbers that allowed DITHOT to get all the photos in the right places in the text (you did great, DITHOT!), and it was her doing to add the stills from FN at the beginning and end (a perfect touch, DITHOT!). I was thrilled when I got home from work and then the dentist's office today to find my tour up here, and all the nice appreciative comments; as Johnny would say, this is all a "great gift" to me. I really enjoyed putting Barrie's words with the pictures and sharing the magic of Kensington Gardens-even-minus-Johnny Depp with the Zone. Thanks for all your sweet responses; I'm just glad I could extend your time in the Gardens a little.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 8:24 pm 
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SRT, I'm glad to hear I managed to get all the right pics in the right holes at it were. My chances of success were greatly enhanced by your wonderful descriptions. :cool:

Hope this made you feel better after your trip to the dentist... :mort1:



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Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2004 9:51 pm 
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Absolutely Wonderful! Thanks so much, SRT and DITHOT. I assume this will be archived for us to enjoy many times over, and for new Zoners to come. This is a truly outstanding post! I now have a huge urge to visit Kensington Gardens! :lilyrose: :lilyrose: :lilyrose:



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Well, you just deal when you have to, really. I mean, if the beast is on your back you just take a couple of pot-shots here and there.~JD
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