Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Author of THE PRICE OF FREEDOM

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Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby Liz » Mon Sep 19, 2011 10:35 am

AVAST! :captainjack:

In honor of International Talk Like a Pirate Day, me mate, DITHOT and I are going to disrupt some sort of high-toned and fancy to-do up at the fort. We will begin posting the Q&A with Ann Crispin.

So grab your effects, hunker down, and drink up me hearties, yo ho. :toastingpirates:

Keep a sharp eye for the next few questions.



ONBC: Obviously there is a ton of research that went into writing Price of Freedom. Which did you find harder - the actual writing or the research? What tips do you have for other writers doing research (like where to start, how to approach it, good sources, etc.)?

Ann: I love doing research, because it mostly involves reading, and I love to read. I don’t trust the internet that much, so I use it as a “first line of defense” to get a general idea of what’s going on, then I verify the info in printed books. I use my local library a lot, and inter-library loan. I gave the Southern MD Library system an acknowledgment in the novel. I also researched by sailing on reproductions of antique sailing ships, such as the Kalmar Nyckel and Sultana. I like to experience things as much as I can, when I have to write about them. I also used to sail on a 28 foot sailboat with my dad in the Chesapeake Bay.

The writing is much harder than the research, but obviously, the writing is the ultimate goal of the research. You find out things in your research, and they fit into the book in ways you never planned for, because you didn’t know those things when you started.

Hope that answer helps!


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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby shadowydog » Mon Sep 19, 2011 4:02 pm

Thanks. Looks like this is going to be an interesting Q/A session. :toastingpirates:
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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby Jackslady » Mon Sep 19, 2011 4:31 pm

Thanks, Ann. I've been on the Cutty Sark and HMS Victory - I have to say that those experiences gave me a greater understanding of what life at sea must have been like in those days. I can imagine actually getting out on the water and experiencing a sailing boat (ship! :biggrin: ), would help immensely with the writing.
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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby shadowydog » Mon Sep 19, 2011 4:51 pm

Jackslady wrote:Thanks, Ann. I've been on the Cutty Sark and HMS Victory - I have to say that those experiences gave me a greater understanding of what life at sea must have been like in those days. I can imagine actually getting out on the water and experiencing a sailing boat (ship! :biggrin: ), would help immensely with the writing.


:highfive: I was fortunate to sail on the Lady Washington which was the Interceptor in CoTBP. Was fun to see how much work adjusting the sails was and to walk on the same deck as Cap'n Jack Sparrow. I remember Ted and Terry talking about how much help the crew of Lady Washington was in polishing the script for POTC.
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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby Theresa » Mon Sep 19, 2011 5:05 pm

I also researched by sailing on reproductions of antique sailing ships, such as the Kalmar Nyckel and Sultana.

Now, that's what I call research! :sailboat:

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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby gemini » Mon Sep 19, 2011 5:59 pm

I agree with everyone that time spent on a ship is excellent research for a pirate book. I sailed on my brothers sail boat, a bit smaller than those mentioned, but I do have replicas of the Cutty Sark and the HMS Victory. I spent much of my youth on boats in the ocean and nothing gives you the feel for that life better than time spent on the water.
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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby moviemom » Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:09 pm

Great first question! I would think that the research is the "easy part" since I'm not a writer.


On a side note, I got to spend part of a summer (best summer camp ever) on a tall ship in Bermuda back in 1976 when I was 15. :capnjack:
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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby stroch » Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:37 pm

Delighted that Ms. Crispin is a fellow bibliophile. The web is great for finding out things, but nothing is better than turning the pages of a book; its really a sensual pleasure. Atlases, travel journals, histories, biographies ... but I'm preaching to the choir here.
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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby Jackslady » Tue Sep 20, 2011 5:10 pm

shadowydog wrote:
Jackslady wrote:Thanks, Ann. I've been on the Cutty Sark and HMS Victory - I have to say that those experiences gave me a greater understanding of what life at sea must have been like in those days. I can imagine actually getting out on the water and experiencing a sailing boat (ship! :biggrin: ), would help immensely with the writing.


:highfive: I was fortunate to sail on the Lady Washington which was the Interceptor in CoTBP. Was fun to see how much work adjusting the sails was and to walk on the same deck as Cap'n Jack Sparrow. I remember Ted and Terry talking about how much help the crew of Lady Washington was in polishing the script for POTC.


Wow! That must have been amazing.

A long time ago I read the autobiography of Frederick Lightholler, one of the officers who survived the Titanic disaster. He wrote vividly about his experiences as a boy sailor, working aloft on sailing ships - this would have been in Victorian times. It was a very hard life even 150 or so years on from PoTC days.
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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby shadowydog » Tue Sep 20, 2011 5:58 pm

Jackslady wrote:
shadowydog wrote:
Jackslady wrote:Thanks, Ann. I've been on the Cutty Sark and HMS Victory - I have to say that those experiences gave me a greater understanding of what life at sea must have been like in those days. I can imagine actually getting out on the water and experiencing a sailing boat (ship! :biggrin: ), would help immensely with the writing.


:highfive: I was fortunate to sail on the Lady Washington which was the Interceptor in CoTBP. Was fun to see how much work adjusting the sails was and to walk on the same deck as Cap'n Jack Sparrow. I remember Ted and Terry talking about how much help the crew of Lady Washington was in polishing the script for POTC.


Wow! That must have been amazing.

A long time ago I read the autobiography of Frederick Lightholler, one of the officers who survived the Titanic disaster. He wrote vividly about his experiences as a boy sailor, working aloft on sailing ships - this would have been in Victorian times. It was a very hard life even 150 or so years on from PoTC days.



What I found amazing was just how small these vessels are. I don't know if it is ok to post these here; :blush: but these are the pictures I took of the "Interceptor"

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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby gemini » Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:05 pm

Thanks shadowydog. Nice photos!
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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby SnoopyDances » Tue Sep 20, 2011 10:29 pm

gemini wrote:I agree with everyone that time spent on a ship is excellent research for a pirate book. I sailed on my brothers sail boat, a bit smaller than those mentioned, but I do have replicas of the Cutty Sark and the HMS Victory. I spent much of my youth on boats in the ocean and nothing gives you the feel for that life better than time spent on the water.

My brothers used to drink Cutty Sark, but I guess that's a different part of pirate research. :toastingpirates:

Unfortunately, I get terribly sea sick, so I've not had the sailing experiences. But I am amazed at all the hard work that goes into sailing one of those ships. After reading the tidbits for this and OST, I am much more appreciative of the details of the ships in old Hollywood pirate/sailing movies.

Thanks, SD, for the pics!

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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Thu Sep 22, 2011 10:29 am

Thanks for the pictures, Shadowdog! :cool:

SnoopyDances, I'm with you over by the rail. I get terribly sea sick. I'm afraid I would have been a washout as a pirate. :yuck2:
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Re: Q&A with A.C. Crispin - #1

Unread postby gemini » Sat Sep 24, 2011 2:56 pm

DeppInTheHeartOfTexas wrote:Thanks for the pictures, Shadowdog! :cool:

SnoopyDances, I'm with you over by the rail. I get terribly sea sick. I'm afraid I would have been a washout as a pirate. :yuck2:

I would also be joining you ladies at the rail. My family always had sea legs so my stomach never kept us on shore. As I said time at sea is great research for the pirate life in many different ways. I have heard even the best of sea farers can get sea sick if it gets rough enough. :lol:
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