Life Tidbit #22 ~ Jammin in Jamaica

by Keith Richards & James Fox

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Life Tidbit #22 ~ Jammin in Jamaica

Unread postby Liz » Mon Oct 31, 2011 7:24 pm

Indulge me here. I may get carried away. I went to Jamaica this summer for a second time, and I have to say that I fell in love with it and the Jamaican people again. I can totally relate to Keef.

The following map contains all of the locations covered in this tidbit:

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Frenchman’s Cove

Pg. 338:
I had first gone to Jamaica for a few days off at a place called Frenchman’s Cove in 1969. You could hear the rhythm going around. Free reggae, rock steady and ska.

Located near Port Antonio on Jamaica’s northeaster shore, Frenchman’s Cove, developed in the 1960s, set the benchmark for top-end all-inclusive, the sort patronized by the very rich and the very famous, looking for the best of the Caribbean while protected from the public gaze. Even Royalty stayed here. Sadly damaged by Hurricane Gilbert in the 1980s, the main building, the cottages and the spectacular landscape have all been restored as a more accessible, environmentally friendly destination for those seeking peace and beauty a little off the beaten track.

Frenchman’s Cove beach was recently featured in the movie Knight and Day starring Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz. Other movies filmed there were Club Paradise (1986) starring Robin Williams, Lord of the Flies (1963), Dr. No was filmed in Ocho Rios and St. Ann's Bay, both of which will be covered later in this tidbit.


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Sorry for so many pics. Just had to give you the full view. It’s really quite a spectacular beach. The waves are bigger than any I could navigate, which is surprising for Jamaica, considering most of the waters are quite calm. These are home pics, if you hadn’t already guessed, from 1986.

And here’s one from the web, just to make it real:

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Jimmy Cliff

Pg. 339:
The Jamaica in those days was not the Jamaica it is now. By 1972 the place was blooming. The Wailers were signed on Island Records. Marley was just sprouting his locks. Jimmy Cliff was in the cinemas with The Harder They Come.

[youtube]xGE4dnrPPZQ[/youtube]



Terra Nova Hotel

Pg. 339:
We were all shacked up at the Terra Nova Hotel, which used to be Chris Blackwell’s family residence in Kingston.

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SAINT ANN'S PARISH

Pg. 341:
Once the recording was over, having decided to stay in Jamaica, Anita, Marlon, Angie and I moved to the north coast, to Mammee Bay, between Ocho Rios and Saint Ann’s Bay.

Pg. 355: I went straight back to Jamaica, where I’d left Anita and the children. We stayed in Mammee Bay that spring of 1973.



Saint Ann’s Bay

Saint Ann's Bay is the capital of Saint Ann Parish. It has a population of 13,671 as of 2009.

When Christopher Columbus first came to Jamaica in 1494, he landed on the shores of St. Ann's Parish. He returned to Jamaica on his fourth voyage and was eventually marooned for one year at St. Ann's Bay (June 1503 - June 1504), which he called Santa Gloria. A statue of Christopher Columbus is located near the town’s main traffic intersection to commemorate the discovery of the bay.

St. Ann’s Bay was named as the Capital of the Parish of St. Ann, largely because of its large harbor and port for shipping goods ranging from bananas to bauxite. In later years, Ocho Rios has eclipsed St. Ann’s Bay due to its rapid growth in tourism and commerce, but St. Ann’s Bay remains a popular destination for those seeking a more traditional Jamaican experience.

One of Jamaica’s most famous citizens, Marcus Garvey, was born in St. Ann’s Bay in 1887, and a statue was erected in his honor in front of the St. Ann’s Bay Library.


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Ocho Rios

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Ocho Ríos is a town in the parish of Saint Ann on the north coast of Jamaica. It was once a fishing village but now caters to tourists. It is a port of call for cruise ships as well as for cargo ships loading sugar, limestone, and in the past, bauxite.

The name "Ocho Rios" (Spanish for "Eight Rivers") is a misnomer because there are not eight rivers in the area. It is most likely a British corruption of the original Spanish name "Las Chorreras" ("the waterfalls"), a name given to the village because of the nearby Dunn's River Falls, which I climbed this past summer with a gazillion other tourists.

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The town has restaurants, night clubs in Margaritaville and Dolphin Cove, where tourists swim and interact with dolphins.

It is perhaps most notable for its use in Dr No, the very first James Bond film, which was released in 1962. It was the home of Miss Taro, played by Zena Marshall, who was an adversary of Bond (Sean Connery) and in alliance with the main villain Dr Julius No (Joseph Wiseman).



Mammee Bay

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Steer Town

Pg. 342:
The only one who actually made a profession of music was Justin Hinds. The King of Ska. Late lamented. A Beautiful singer—Sam Cooke reincarnated. Hinds and Dominoes, was a huge hit in Jamaica in 1963. In the few years before he died in 2005, he recorded albums with his band the Jamaica All Stars. And he was still very much one of the brethren of Steer Town, a fearsome place just inland into which I never would have ventured—let’s say I wouldn’t have been welcome there--before I knew them.

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[youtube]unEzDLs2HjE[/youtube]





Rasta

Pg. 343:
Rastafarianism was a religion, but it was a smokers’ religion. Their principle was “ignore their world,” live without society. Of course they didn’t or couldn’t – Rastafarianism is a forlorn hope. But at the same time, it’s such a beautiful forlorn hope.

The Rastafari movement or Rasta is a religious movement that arose in the 1930s in Jamaica, at the time a country with a predominantly Christian culture where 98% of the people were the black descendants of slaves. Its adherents worship Haile Selassie I, Emperor of Ethiopia (1930–1974), as God incarnate, the Second Advent, or the reincarnation of Jesus.

Members of the Rastafari movement are known as Rastas, or Rastafari. The movement is sometimes referred to as "Rastafarianism", but this term is considered derogatory and offensive by some Rastas, who, being highly critical of isms which they see as a typical part of Babylon culture, dislike being labeled as an "ism" themselves.

The Rastafarian movement began with the teachings of Jamaican publicist, organizer, and black nationalist Marcus Garvey (1887-1940) who led a "Back to Africa" movement. He taught that Africans are the true Israelites and have been exiled to Jamaica and other parts of the world as divine punishment.

Garvey encouraged pride in being black and worked to reverse the mindset of inferiority that centuries of enslavement had ingrained on the minds of blacks. Garvey is regarded as a second John the Baptist and famously prophesied in 1927, "Look to Africa, for there a king shall be crowned."

The Rastafari movement encompasses themes such as the spiritual use of cannabis and the rejection of western society, called Babylon (from the metaphorical Babylon of the Christian New Testament). It proclaims Africa (also "Zion") as the original birthplace of mankind, and from the beginning of the movement the call to repatriation to Africa has been a central theme. Rasta also embraces various Afrocentric and Pan-African social and political aspirations, such as the sociopolitical views and teachings of Marcus Garvey (also often regarded as a prophet). Another theme is Royalty, with Rastas seeing themselves as African royalty and using honorifics such as Prince or King in order to give royalty to their names.

Rastafari is not a highly organized religion; it is a movement and an ideology. Many Rastas say that it is not a "religion" at all, but a "Way of Life". Many Rastas do not claim any sect or denomination, and thus encourage one another to find faith and inspiration within themselves, although some do identify strongly with one of the "mansions of Rastafari" — the three most prominent of these being the Nyahbinghi, the Bobo Ashanti and the Twelve Tribes of Israel.

The name Rastafari is taken from Ras Tafari, the pre-regnal title of Haile Selassie I, composed of Amharic Ras(literally "Head", an Ethiopian title equivalent to Duke), and Haile Selassie's pre-regal given name, Tafari. Rastafari are generally distinguished for asserting the doctrine that Haile Selassie I, the former and final Emperor of Ethiopia, is another incarnation of the Christian God, called Jah. Most see Haile Selassie I as Jah or Jah Rastafari, who is the second coming of Jesus Christ onto the Earth, but to others he is simply God's chosen king on earth.

Today, awareness of the Rastafari movement has spread throughout much of the world, largely through interest generated by reggae music, a notable exponent of which was Jamaican singer/songwriter Bob Marley (1945–1981). By 1997, there were around one million Rastafari faithful worldwide. In the 2001 Jamaican census, 24,020 individuals (less than 1 percent of the population) identified themselves as Rastafarians. Other sources have estimated that in the 2000s they formed "about 5 percent of the population" of Jamaica, or have conjectured that "there are perhaps as many as 100,000 Rastafarians in Jamaica".




Bob Marley

Pg. 345:
I was shacking up with this really weird, unknown sect, Bob Marley and the Wailers happened and Rastas suddenly became fashionable all over the world. They went global just within that year. Before Bob Marley became a Rastafarian, he was trying to be one of the Temptations. Like anybody else in the music business, he’d had a long career already, in rock steady, ska, etc. But others said, “Hey, Marley didn’t have no f**king locks, you know? He weren’t a Rasta until it became cute.” The first time the Wailers went to England, soon after this, I caught them by chance up in Tottenham Court Road. I thought they were pretty feeble compared to what I’d been hearing in Steer Town. But they certainly got their act together real quick. Family Man joined in on the bass, and Bob obviously had all of the stuff required.

Here is Bob being "cute" (sorry, I happen to love Bob Marley, so I don’t want to think of him as “cute”). Is it just me, or do you think that Sting was majorly influenced by Bob?

[youtube]JLYOOezs3DA[/youtube]




Wingless Angels

Pg. 347:
We had to wait twenty years for that to happen, to get the take we wanted, which is when they became known as the Wingless Angels.

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Check out this website for Wingless Angels. Keith will be in the short film trailer (3rd down & the only video):






Point of View

Pg. 357:
So we went touring with our landlord at the time, Ernie Smatt, who showed me Tommy Steele’s house tucked away up in the hills above Ocho Rios. Its name was Point of View and I still own it to this day.

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Mapping it:




An interesting interview that takes place at Point of View:


[youtube]Eq90bcKsZwU[/youtube]


[youtube]Urv9ZbKxrM4[/youtube]





Sly & Robbie

Pg. 416:
One of the great sessions I have played on happened around this time, when Lil and I went to Jamaica and I fell in with Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare, who were making a Black Uhuru album. Sly and Robbie were one of the best rhythm sections in the world. We did seven tracks together in one night, and one of them, called “Shine Eye Gal,” became a great big hit and a classic. Another was an instrumental called “Dirty Harry” for Sly’s album Sly, Wicked and Slick.


I LOVE THIS:

[youtube]rJB-PBbOWj8[/youtube]


It is unclear (to me) as to whether Keith is actually on this track:


[youtube]7VKMjOyR9vE[/youtube]




Maureen Freemantle

Pg. 514:


Maureen Freemantle: One night Keith was with Locksie in Mang Treegar in Steer Town, and I was passing that night, so Locksie says, sister Maureen, come in, come and have a drink. And I go in and I meet this guy. Keith hug me and says, this sister look like a real sister. And then we started to have a drink; I was having rum and milk. And then it was like….I don’t know, the power of Jah. I just start to sing. Yes, just start to sing. And Keith said, this lady have to come by me. And it never turned back from then. I just start to sing. And I was reeling. And I started to sing, love, peace, joy, happiness, and it burst into one thing. It was something else.

It sounds like Maureen is singing in this:

[youtube]73HzLzW3iiA[/youtube]



For more information on Jamaica, see my tidbit from the OST Discussion:





Sources:

Earbender
IMDb
ReligionFacts.com
Wikipedia
WinglessAngels.com
YardEdge.net
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Bix
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Re: Life Tidbit #22 ~ Jammin in Jamaica

Unread postby Bix » Mon Oct 31, 2011 11:32 pm

Oh, Liz, I am so jealous of you! Ocho Rios and Port Antonio may just be some of my favorite spots on earth, but I haven't been there in sooooo long. I'm glad to hear that you had a good experience there this summer. That encourages me to perhaps go back one more time. And, no, it's not just you - Sting and the Police were majorly influenced by Bob Marley. And I can't figure out why I never got to be Chris Blackwell's girlfriend! It would have been my perfect life! Thanks for this great trip down memory lane for me, jammin' in Jamaica!
Live! Life is a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death! ~Auntie Mame

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Re: Life Tidbit #22 ~ Jammin in Jamaica

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Tue Nov 01, 2011 2:56 am

Thanks Liz and lucky you to have been there :ok:
Always loved that little look Keith gives us of his house there. I can't recall if he says that in the book but he no longer goes there much I think he gave the house to Marlon.

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Re: Life Tidbit #22 ~ Jammin in Jamaica

Unread postby Liz » Tue Nov 01, 2011 2:36 pm

Lucky Marlon!

Bix, I'm glad I could bring back good memories for you. and yes, you really should go "back to Jamaica."
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: Life Tidbit #22 ~ Jammin in Jamaica

Unread postby Theresa » Tue Nov 01, 2011 2:43 pm

I haven't had a chance to go through this full tidbit yet, but I did want to say that when you first posted it, I saw the title while I was on my cellphone and I thought it said Jammies in Jamaica! :lol:

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Re: Life Tidbit #22 ~ Jammin in Jamaica

Unread postby Gilbert's Girl » Tue Nov 01, 2011 2:59 pm

Theresa wrote:I haven't had a chance to go through this full tidbit yet, but I did want to say that when you first posted it, I saw the title while I was on my cellphone and I thought it said Jammies in Jamaica! :lol:

:lol: well you never know I'm sure there are some of those

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Re: Life Tidbit #22 ~ Jammin in Jamaica

Unread postby Liz » Tue Nov 01, 2011 3:14 pm

Gilbert's Girl wrote:
Theresa wrote:I haven't had a chance to go through this full tidbit yet, but I did want to say that when you first posted it, I saw the title while I was on my cellphone and I thought it said Jammies in Jamaica! :lol:

:lol: well you never know I'm sure there are some of those

Yes, when they get a couple of cold days (68 or 70 degrees) in the winter their bodies can't handle it. They need their jackets. :lol: Well, that's the story the bus driver in Montego Bay told us.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.


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