TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

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TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby Liz » Mon Aug 08, 2011 11:34 am

Comment on the backstory of Cutler Beckett.
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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby Jackslady » Mon Aug 08, 2011 12:03 pm

Cutler Beckett's backstory gave me a much more rounded picture of him, and has enhanced my enjoyment of watching his scenes with Jack in the films. I found the mounting tension between the two characters quite gripping and whilst always rooting for Jack (of course!), I could see why Beckett had become such a cruel and selfish person.
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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby nebraska » Mon Aug 08, 2011 12:23 pm

I also enjoyed Cutler Beckett's back story a lot. In fact, he seemed to have a much more detailed and sympathetic back-story in POF than Jack did. I never could grasp Beckett's hatred of Jack and his actual niche in the POTC stories, so Ann filled in a lot of gaps very nicely for me. As I was reading POF I kept seeing him walking down the stairs in his full military garb as the ship blew up around him and I felt some sympathy/understanding for him.

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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby Linda Lee » Mon Aug 08, 2011 12:39 pm

I enoyed knowing more about his background and what motivated him. Also, because the movies implied some secret in the past was the cause of the animosity between Jack and Beckett, I was curious. I think Ann did a great job in filling in those blanks.
While I felt sympathy for the boy Cutler, I was sorry to see the type of man he became.
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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby Liz » Mon Aug 08, 2011 2:05 pm

We have an accord. He became a much more sympathetic character for me. And it explained why he turned out the way he did. His final scene in AWE took on much more significance and emotion after having read his back story.

On pg. 214 Beckett describes how he ran away from home. What did you think about his choice to run away at that particular time?
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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby Johanna » Mon Aug 08, 2011 3:59 pm

I really enjoyed reading the back story for Beckett and found it did a good job giving us a picture of how he became the villain we loved to hate in DMC and AWE. It made me sympathize with Beckett and put him on the same level as Jack, which is something I always liked about the films.

The films made them both into two very smart, ambitious men who wanted what they wanted and weren't going to let anyone stand in their way. They just had drastically different ways of going about it. It's the same in the book with a bit of an addition that I found fascinating: they both had come from childhoods where they were constantly pressured to live up to what their fathers wanted them to be. I agree with Liz and nebraska when they say that it made Beckett's death in AWE so much more bittersweet.

I was telling Radwen a bit of the back-story A.C. wrote for Beckett a few days ago. I mentioned the scene where Beckett's father is talking to him about his future career ambitions and mentioned how his father told him he hadn't the "head for business". She commented on the irony of that line considering one of Beckett's last lines in the film is "it's just good business". I didn't even think about that until she mentioned it, but it just made me realize even more how amazing of a job the book's back-story did for Beckett's character.

The back-story to me really became great in the fact that it made you feel sorry for Beckett and regret what he had to go through in his life, but it didn't necessarily make you agree with him anymore as an adult.
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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby Liz » Mon Aug 08, 2011 4:16 pm

Johanna wrote:
I was telling Radwen a bit of the back-story A.C. wrote for Beckett a few days ago. I mentioned the scene where Beckett's father is talking to him about his future career ambitions and mentioned how his father told him he hadn't the "head for business". She commented on the irony of that line considering one of Beckett's last lines in the film is "it's just good business". I didn't even think about that until she mentioned it, but it just made me realize even more how amazing of a job the book's back-story did for Beckett's character.

Kudos to Ann for her attention to detail. :hatsoff:
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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby fireflydances » Mon Aug 08, 2011 4:42 pm

I think Ann did a good job. The back story is very credible and also deep enough that she could provide lots of insight into the guy's thinking which in turn gives the reader more meat so to speak. I have to say however that I developed no good vibes about Mr. Cutler Beckett. Despicable little toady if you ask me.

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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby fansmom » Mon Aug 08, 2011 4:58 pm

fireflydances wrote:I think Ann did a good job. The back story is very credible and also deep enough that she could provide lots of insight into the guy's thinking which in turn gives the reader more meat so to speak. I have to say however that I developed no good vibes about Mr. Cutler Beckett. Despicable little toady if you ask me.

:whistle: Did I say that?

Well, yes, despicable little toady, but I think she captured his voice perfectly. She really had a feel for his rationalizations for his actions.

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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby moviemom » Mon Aug 08, 2011 8:17 pm

fansmom wrote:
fireflydances wrote:I think Ann did a good job. The back story is very credible and also deep enough that she could provide lots of insight into the guy's thinking which in turn gives the reader more meat so to speak. I have to say however that I developed no good vibes about Mr. Cutler Beckett. Despicable little toady if you ask me.

:whistle: Did I say that?

Well, yes, despicable little toady, but I think she captured his voice perfectly. She really had a feel for his rationalizations for his actions.

I agree with you both.

I also didn't like his father and rather enjoyed that bit when he told him off. :lol:
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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Mon Aug 08, 2011 8:34 pm

Like you all, I really enjoyed this character. Even though I agree he was a toady, at least we know why. It put him on a more or less equal footing with Jack and explained the history behind all the animosity. It makes me want to go back and see their scenes together in the POTC films. I also thought of his final scenes in the film and, although I didn't necessarily feel sorry for him, I did feel the sense of tragedy and unfairness he must have felt. I still held him responsible for the choices he made even though we can now see his motivation. Well done, Ann! :hatsoff:
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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby SnoopyDances » Mon Aug 08, 2011 8:51 pm

:applause2: Well done, indeed, Ann.
You captured the character beautifully and gave him an interesting backstory.
I could see his relationship with his father and brothers, but the sister surprised me. I didn't think anyone would like Cutler as a boy...it was interesting that he had an empathetic sibling that understood and agreed with him.

It made me wonder if he would have turned out differently if his sister had lived and was able to join him. At least maybe soften his persona a little.

In the end, though, I think he turned into his father...he let Mercer do the dirty work, but he wasn't opposed to it...and his contempt for others and their situations was similar to his father's, I thought.

Although I didn't feel sorry for him, I did understand him better. I loved how he thought he could control Jack, but Jack caught on equally as quick.

I also liked the juxtaposition that Cutler grew to be like the father he hated, but Jack grew up to be the opposite of the father he hated. It showed that no matter the early influences on your life, you can still choose to be who you become.

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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby gemini » Tue Aug 09, 2011 12:22 am

I also liked learning about Beckett. I thought it strange that his ultimate goal was to be awarded a title. He did become like his father using his power to achieve his goals but strangely the title would have been to impress his father with the fact they he misjudged Beckett. His mother and sisters deaths showed the dependency and lack of choices women had in those days.
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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby ladylinn » Tue Aug 09, 2011 11:31 am

Thanks Ann for the backstory of Cutler Beckett. In the movies - they left out of how he became so obsessed with power and title. Altho I don't have too much sympathy for him - I understand how he became so driven.

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Re: TPOF Question #3 - Cutler Beckett

Unread postby ac crispin » Tue Aug 09, 2011 5:57 pm

When you have to write an unlikeable character, you think about what kind of influences made him (or her) into such a person. Disney told me that CB was obsessed with gaining a title. (I think that was in reference to his quick correction "Dead Man's Chest" when someone called him "Sir," and he was quick to say, "Actually, it's LORD Beckett, now.")

It's like lining up a bunch of dominoes in time, and then pushing them over in reverse order when you create backstory. You think, "What could have caused a person to grow up being like that?" and then you come up with a reasonable explanation and make that part of the character you're developing.

I also decided, from watching that scene in CB's cabin in AWE many times, plus reading the deleted lines from that scene (it was at one point much longer and more detailed) that CB was obsessed with Jack, and controlling him. He wanted Jack to be HIS minion. I didn't see CB as being particularly sexual in his desires. He struck me as someone who got off on gaining power for himself. And he wanted Jack to be HIS -- the way Mercer was his.

Jack, fortunately, had other ideas. :captainjack:

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Release date: May 17, 2011


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