OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

by Tim Powers

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OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby Liz » Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:04 pm

The nights are wholesome; then no planets strike,
No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm,
So hallow'd and so gracious is the time.

—William Shakespeare


How is this quote from the Epilogue relevant?
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby Liz » Tue Apr 12, 2011 10:20 am

I guess I know what my question will be for Tim for the Q&A. :lol:

So nobody has any ideas?
:-/
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby nebraska » Tue Apr 12, 2011 3:08 pm

The closest I can come is that now the struggles with magic and demons is over, Jack and Beth will live happily and peacefully ever after.

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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby Buster » Tue Apr 12, 2011 8:54 pm

I agree, nebraska. Beth and Shandy are walking out of a dark and magical space into the dawn of their life together (sorry about how trite and goo-ey that came out, but you get the gist...)

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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby fireflydances » Tue Apr 12, 2011 10:29 pm

Don't know if this is useful or not, but if nothing else it frames quote a bit more.
There is yet more concerning the significance of the crowing of the c**k. Horatio goes on to say that he has heard tell that once this sound is heard at break of day, any ghost or spirit walking abroad must at once quit the land of the living and flee “To his confine” – wherever that may be; we are not told.

Another of the guards, Marcellus, confirms that the ghost vanished when the crowing of the c**k was heard. He then launches into one of those tangential disquisitions that are, for me, one of the special joys of Shakespeare:

Some say that ever ‘gainst that season comes
Wherein our Saviour’s birth is celebrated,
The bird of dawning singeth all night long:
And then, they say, no spirit dares stir abroad;
The nights are wholesome; then no planets strike,
No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm,
So hallow’d and so gracious is the time.

Well! what of that? Horatio’s brief response is both cautious and tantalizing:

So have I heard and do in part believe it.

Here is the:

So, I guess the significance then is that ghosts are gone, departed, never to return. And those left are free of fear, no more charms to harm, no fairies, no planetary disasters or the like. Peace. Quiet nights. I see our happy couple standing at the water's edge as day become night.
Last edited by fireflydances on Tue Apr 12, 2011 10:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby specktater » Tue Apr 12, 2011 10:32 pm

:hatsoff: Pardon me, you guys. I happened to stop by and noticed this question and was intrigued by it. Mind if I stick my nose in for a bit? I have some tidbits to add, if you wouldn't mind. Maybe it will help you get your answer, Liz.?

The quote is from Hamlet, Act I, Scene 2, page 2- very early in the play where the night watchmen have encountered Hamlet's father's ghost-- even before Hamlet does. I find it interesting that the author uses the quote as an epilogue-- as if trying to "close up shop,"--no outside force can change the course of the story at this point, this idea is juxtaposed in the way Shakespeare uses this quote-- as a sort of "calm before the storm" literary device. One would think the play has ended as soon as it has begun knowing that Hamlet's father has died, but...it's just the beginning.

I found this cool website. Hope this helps! Happy reading/ discussing!




Original:

MARCELLUS:
It faded on the crowing of the c**k.
Some say that ever, 'gainst that season comes(175)
Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated,
The bird of dawning singeth all night long;
And then, they say, no spirit dare stir abroad,
The nights are wholesome, then no planets strike,
No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm,(180)
So hallow'd and so gracious is the time.

Modern:

MARCELLUS:
It faded on the crowing of the rooster.
Some say that when that season comes
In which we celebrate Christmas,
The rooster will sing all night long,
And then, they say, no spirit dares to walk abroad.
The nights are wholesome, no planets change course,
No fairy takes children, a witch has no power to charm,
The time is so holy and so full of goodness.

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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby fireflydances » Tue Apr 12, 2011 10:35 pm

Hey Spectater. Great minds think alike? Nice running into you!
"Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed and some few to be chewed and digested." Sir Francis Bacon, Of Studies

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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby specktater » Tue Apr 12, 2011 10:48 pm

:goodvibes: Thank you, fireflydances! (indeed! great minds...lol!) It's nice meeting you here too! I just read your post, and I think it's more on target/ relevant than my input! The author, it seems, deliberately used the quote to signify the end of Jack's life as the reader knew it and begin a new "type of life." I don't know the author's works well enough to know if he wrote a sequel, but if he brings back Jack in a later work, then he very deliberately used the quote in the way Shakespeare did to make one think that was the end when really, it was a door to a new beginning.

Thanks so much for welcoming me! :bouquet:

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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby fireflydances » Tue Apr 12, 2011 11:36 pm

specktater wrote:The author, it seems, deliberately used the quote to signify the end of Jack's life as the reader knew it and begin a new "type of life."
I like that. The end of one life and the beginning of very different life. In a way, its a kind of small resurrection, and the story of the Fountain of Youth is very basically that of resurrection. Jack is being reborn, Beth also.
"Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed and some few to be chewed and digested." Sir Francis Bacon, Of Studies

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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Wed Apr 13, 2011 11:20 am

You guys are good! Thanks for stopping by, specktater. Join in any time!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -
Wow! What a ride!

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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby Liz » Thu Apr 14, 2011 1:35 am

They sure are good, DITHOT! I am in awe.

Specktater :welcome: to the discussion. I think you can add a lot to it.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby specktater » Thu Apr 14, 2011 11:16 pm

Thanks, DITHOT and Liz! I was just reading your thread on motion and time, and NOW YOU'VE REALLY got me intrigued! Hi, I didn't realize the author is interacting with you all as well! :blush: What fun! Tim, if you're reading this thread! :bigwave: I'm sorry to be joining you all so late in the game! I will try to get back here more often. Thanks again! :hatsoff:

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Re: OST Question #18 - Shakespeare

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:21 pm

:cool:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -

Wow! What a ride!


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