Babylon Nights Question #2 ~ The Internet

by Daniel Depp

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Re: Babylon Nights Question #2 ~ The Internet

Unread postby Liz » Sun Jan 09, 2011 2:32 am

Lots of good stuff here to respond to.....


Well said, Theresa. I’d take the internet over TV too, gemini & nebraska. T, I know what you mean about IMDb. And this, I guess validates what ~SB said. I am terrible with names of actors. So when I can’t remember, I just go to IMDb. I’m always hoping that I will remember the name just before I get there. What’s nice to know is that 9 times out of 10, I will remember just in the nick of time, as it were.

Betty Sue & Linda Lee, you can’t beat the shopping. Today I wanted to pick up a CD when I was downtown, but it was too far of a walk & I was running out of time, so I decided I’d order it on Amazon. Afterall, I’ve got free shipping. It can’t get much easier than that. BTW it was Black Angels, which I heard when I walked through Urban Outfitters. Have you guys heard them? Shades of Jefferson Airplane. Now they had better be on Amazon, LOL. Yes, there they are.

Buster, my DH finds a lot of auto fixes on the Internet, and just this week, we received about 10 packages of car parts from online orders he made.

~SB, interesting hypothesis. But should they be using smartphones while taking a test?

Fansmom, my dad is probably amazed at how he can ask me to look into something (he’s apologetic at first, saying “if you don’t mind….”) and while we’re talking on the phone I find it. I am amazed at your story, though, and am curious how you actually found them.

Firefly, I know what you mean because sometimes I feel like Daniel is talking to me specifically, but I know that is ridiculous. I think that we need to explore this more at some point. ;-) And, yes, I think that his statement about the Internet was important. I think it pointed to what info that Perec was able to find on his idol.

I think that the Internet is the wave of the future, if not the present already. For example, print editions of magazines (at least in the electronics industry) are beginning to be a thing of the past. The ones that are still in existence and circulating are half the thickness that they used to be. The same goes for newspapers.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: Babylon Nights Question #2 ~ The Internet

Unread postby ~SB » Sun Jan 09, 2011 3:16 am

~SB, interesting hypothesis. But should they be using smartphones while taking a test?


I'm sure they'd love to, but they can't use any electronic devices during tests. :grin: What they do is learn the information for the day of the test, and then, for the most part, it's gone. They don't retain it. Of course, that's not every student, but it's definitely a lot of them. We're currently reading Fahrenheit 451, so we're talking a lot about technology and how it affects our lives. On Friday, we were discussing this article. I mentioned my concerns about their ability to retain information, and they agreed. One student mentioned that she really doesn't worry about memorizing everything for her Spanish class because if she forgets, she has a translation app on her phone.
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Re: Babylon Nights Question #2 ~ The Internet

Unread postby gemini » Sun Jan 09, 2011 5:53 pm

~SB wrote:
~SB, interesting hypothesis. But should they be using smartphones while taking a test?


I'm sure they'd love to, but they can't use any electronic devices during tests. :grin: What they do is learn the information for the day of the test, and then, for the most part, it's gone. They don't retain it. Of course, that's not every student, but it's definitely a lot of them. We're currently reading Fahrenheit 451, so we're talking a lot about technology and how it affects our lives. On Friday, we were discussing this article. I mentioned my concerns about their ability to retain information, and they agreed. One student mentioned that she really doesn't worry about memorizing everything for her Spanish class because if she forgets, she has a translation app on her phone.


SB that link was very interesting.
Funny, being an oldster compared to the kids they are describing in the article, I find the loss of some of those items a negative and not a positive. Even though I love my electronic toys, and could not stand to part with the Internet, I want to keep some of my old things. For example…..
Books, magazines, and newspaper: I hate to read books on the internet. I love to take my book to relax and get away from my electronics. Same with the newspaper. I think loosing these things tragic.
Wires: Wires connecting phones to walls? Funny everyone lost their cell phone service during our last hurricane and only me and one relative with wired phones were able to communicate. Not to mention that my wired phone cost less than $20 a month.
Retirement plans: Well I am glad I have one. I look around at people today who can’t pay their bills and wonder what they are going to do when they retire.
The separation of work and home: I don’t know about people now but I liked being separated from work when I went home.
Watches: I’ll keep my watch. I got rid of my cell phone when I retired. It’s nice to not be so available all the time.
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." Will Rogers

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Re: Babylon Nights Question #2 ~ The Internet

Unread postby Liz » Sun Jan 09, 2011 7:09 pm

gemini wrote:
~SB wrote:
~SB, interesting hypothesis. But should they be using smartphones while taking a test?


I'm sure they'd love to, but they can't use any electronic devices during tests. :grin: What they do is learn the information for the day of the test, and then, for the most part, it's gone. They don't retain it. Of course, that's not every student, but it's definitely a lot of them. We're currently reading Fahrenheit 451, so we're talking a lot about technology and how it affects our lives. On Friday, we were discussing this article. I mentioned my concerns about their ability to retain information, and they agreed. One student mentioned that she really doesn't worry about memorizing everything for her Spanish class because if she forgets, she has a translation app on her phone.


SB that link was very interesting.
Funny, being an oldster compared to the kids they are describing in the article, I find the loss of some of those items a negative and not a positive. Even though I love my electronic toys, and could not stand to part with the Internet, I want to keep some of my old things. For example…..
Books, magazines, and newspaper: I hate to read books on the internet. I love to take my book to relax and get away from my electronics. Same with the newspaper. I think loosing these things tragic.
Wires: Wires connecting phones to walls? Funny everyone lost their cell phone service during our last hurricane and only me and one relative with wired phones were able to communicate. Not to mention that my wired phone cost less than $20 a month.
Retirement plans: Well I am glad I have one. I look around at people today who can’t pay their bills and wonder what they are going to do when they retire.
The separation of work and home: I don’t know about people now but I liked being separated from work when I went home.
Watches: I’ll keep my watch. I got rid of my cell phone when I retired. It’s nice to not be so available all the time.

Thanks for that link, ~SB. It really resonated with me, although, for the most part, I don't think I had really thought much about it before, except in the case of travel agents and print media.

Gemini, I agree with your entire list. I could get away without a watch unless I'm running or walking and don't want to be burdened with the weight of my cell phone. I do not like my accessibility to my boss or clients in off hours. I think that's where people have to create boundaries. And I am not ready to give up my land line--mostly because I live in a rural area where the power frequently goes out.
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.

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Re: Babylon Nights Question #2 ~ The Internet

Unread postby fireflydances » Sun Jan 09, 2011 9:15 pm

Liz wrote: Firefly, I know what you mean because sometimes I feel like Daniel is talking to me specifically, but I know that is ridiculous. I think that we need to explore this more at some point.


Just to clarify, what I mean is he seems to be using a literary technique whereby the author speaks directly to the reader so that the walls of the book are opened and the reader could, theoretically, be as much a part of the 'action' as the characters. I read a little about something in theatre called 'breaking the fourth wall" (from Wiki) "The presence of the fourth wall is an established convention of modern realistic theatre, which has led some artists to draw direct attention to it for dramatic or comedic effect when this boundary is "broken", for example by an actor onstage speaking to the audience directly. The acceptance of the transparency of the fourth wall is part of the suspension of disbelief between a fictional work and an audience, allowing them to enjoy the fiction as if they were observing real events." Given that mean MOST detective stories already involve their readers more than a straightforward fictional piece does -- you are intended to follow clues and solve the mystery -- it's possible to consider all kinds of interesting variations on this, all kinds of ways of actively involving the reader. Just a thought.
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Re: Babylon Nights Question #2 ~ The Internet

Unread postby DeppInTheHeartOfTexas » Mon Jan 10, 2011 4:45 pm

We will be dicussing his writing style in an upcoming question, so that will be a good time to get into it in a more detailed way.

I know my friend in Houston keeps her land line so she will have a phone if the power goes out in a hurricane. When my kids were little people were upset over the use of digital watches because kids would never learn to tell time on a clock face. Then it was velcro shoes - they'll never learn to tie shoe laces. :rolleyes: I do have to admit though that we had an old rotary dial phone in the school office and some kids did not know how to use it!
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Re: Babylon Nights Question #2 ~ The Internet

Unread postby moviemom » Mon Jan 10, 2011 5:52 pm

The Internet was wonderful. You could find anything on the Internet, provided you looked hard enough.

Even things people aren't supposed to find.
The year's no doubt, have changed me, sir. -- Sweeney Todd :sweeneysmile:

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Re: Babylon Nights Question #2 ~ The Internet

Unread postby ~SB » Mon Jan 10, 2011 10:36 pm

When my kids were little people were upset over the use of digital watches because kids would never learn to tell time on a clock face.


I hate to say this, but a lot of my sophomores can't just look at an analog clock face and tell the time. They have to stand there and stare at it a little, and you know they're counting, "five, ten, fifteen. . ." in their heads. :-) It's not that they can't tell the time, but it doesn't come to them automatically. Many of them only have digital time pieces in their homes.
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Re: Babylon Nights Question #2 ~ The Internet

Unread postby Liz » Mon Jan 10, 2011 11:22 pm

I remember the clock issue too. That is why teachers spent a lot of time on clocks in school. But maybe teachers have always done that. I do not know.

And on the shoe tying......you'd better know how to do it, because velcro isn't cool. :mwahaha:
You can't judge a book by its cover.

The only thing that matters is the ending. It's the most important part of the story.


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